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Does Anyone Here Love Yurts?

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  • Laura Martin-Bühler
    I do and wrote an article about them after visiting Blue Evening Star with my three sons to learn how to build and erect one. The article is at:
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 16, 2003
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      I do and wrote an article about them after visiting Blue Evening Star
      with my three sons to learn how to build and erect one. The article is at:
      http://www.infowest.com/business/g/gentle/yurt.html
      There is also a yurt message board at http://www.infowest.com/gentle
      under Sustainable Life on Mother Earth
      En paz y La Luz, Laura
    • alidisaster
      They are great things to sleep in - I have some friends who live in a double yurt, and several friends who have yurts and charama dhu. I held storytelling
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 17, 2003
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        They are great things to sleep in - I have some friends who live in a
        double yurt, and several friends who have yurts and charama dhu. I
        held storytelling sessions in one for children, and they are so
        lovely and quiet.

        There are 3 drawbacks - bulk - damp (in a UK summer you have to keep
        heating them to drive out the damp - and, in long-term living, mice
        and rats tend to move in.

        THe bulk doesn't matter too much if you are van-camping, and the damp
        isn't a winter problem - the heavy canvas or felt cover is quite a
        good insulator, and you can use a charcol burner if you don't want a
        stovepipe. In summer, the damp is a real pain - the friends who live
        in one end up keeping it very, very hot in summer. It can be like a
        sauna.

        Rats and mice can be kept away with ferrets and terriers.

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Laura Martin-Bühler
        <gentle_survivalist@y...> wrote:
        > I do and wrote an article about them after visiting Blue Evening
        Star
        > with my three sons to learn how to build and erect one. The article
        is at:
        > http://www.infowest.com/business/g/gentle/yurt.html
        > There is also a yurt message board at http://www.infowest.com/gentle
        > under Sustainable Life on Mother Earth
        > En paz y La Luz, Laura
      • Laura Martin-Bühler
        Thanks for the yurt info from your part of the word. It is pretty dry out here in the four corners area. A good way to dry them is to roll them up a little and
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 17, 2003
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          Thanks for the yurt info from your part of the word. It is pretty dry
          out here in the four corners area. A good way to dry them is to roll
          them up a little and get more air circulation. They fit nicely in the
          back of a pickup. En paz, laura--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com,
          "alidisaster" <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
          > They are great things to sleep in - I have some friends who live in a
          > double yurt, and several friends who have yurts and charama dhu. I
          > held storytelling sessions in one for children, and they are so
          > lovely and quiet.
          >
          > There are 3 drawbacks - bulk - damp (in a UK summer you have to keep
          > heating them to drive out the damp - and, in long-term living, mice
          > and rats tend to move in.
          >
          > THe bulk doesn't matter too much if you are van-camping, and the damp
          > isn't a winter problem - the heavy canvas or felt cover is quite a
          > good insulator, and you can use a charcol burner if you don't want a
          > stovepipe. In summer, the damp is a real pain - the friends who live
          > in one end up keeping it very, very hot in summer. It can be like a
          > sauna.
          >
          > Rats and mice can be kept away with ferrets and terriers.
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Laura Martin-Bühler
          > <gentle_survivalist@y...> wrote:
          > > I do and wrote an article about them after visiting Blue Evening
          > Star
          > > with my three sons to learn how to build and erect one. The article
          > is at:
          > > http://www.infowest.com/business/g/gentle/yurt.html
          > > There is also a yurt message board at http://www.infowest.com/gentle
          > > under Sustainable Life on Mother Earth
          > > En paz y La Luz, Laura
        • alidisaster
          Do you find they get hot in the sunny weather? There is something magical about the quietness, and light in them. Most people here make a transparent dome over
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 17, 2003
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            Do you find they get hot in the sunny weather?

            There is something magical about the quietness, and light in them.
            Most people here make a transparent dome over the central ring, and
            it amazing to step into the structure, that looks like it will be
            dark, but there is this light flooding down.

            For warmth, it is common over here to put Oriental rugs over the top,
            before covering with canvas/tarps. The roofs are then very beautiful.

            Have you heard of a charama dhu (not sure about spelling)? It is a
            mongolian thing like a yurt, but none of the poles are longer than 2
            metres. The sides are made up of triangles of poles, one triangle
            pointing up, the next down. The roof has longer poles (2mtres give
            you nearly 4 mtre diameter), making triangles from the sides to the
            apex. They are a lot easier to make than a yurt, mostly because you
            don't have to make the central ring. Also, one person can erect one
            by themselves.

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Laura Martin-Bühler
            <gentle_survivalist@y...> wrote:
            > Thanks for the yurt info from your part of the word. It is pretty
            dry
            > out here in the four corners area. A good way to dry them is to roll
            > them up a little and get more air circulation. They fit nicely in
            the
            > back of a pickup. En paz, laura--- In
          • colonelcorn76
            ... Yurts (Kibitkas) traditionally use a technique of rolling the wall coverings up from the ground to create a convective current that sweeps under the walls
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 17, 2003
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "alidisaster"
              <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
              > Do you find they get hot in the sunny weather?

              Yurts (Kibitkas) traditionally use a technique of rolling the wall
              coverings up from the ground to create a convective current that
              sweeps under the walls up & out through the center vent hole. Also,
              rather than use a full set of felt coverings, the walls are often
              just a single layer of felt or even woven reeds. This allows for
              ventilation while still resulting in privacy.

              >
              > There is something magical about the quietness, and light in
              them.
              > Most people here make a transparent dome over the central ring,
              and
              > it amazing to step into the structure, that looks like it will be
              > dark, but there is this light flooding down.

              Properly built you shouldn't need the central ring covering at all.
              If you leave that off, you get natural currents to ventilate the
              interior and a small center stove is enough to keep the dwelling
              warm. The open ring acts as a natural chimney. To keep rain out, the
              common technique is to offset a cover a foot or two above the
              central opening that looks like a "hat" on the roof.

              >
              > For warmth, it is common over here to put Oriental rugs over the
              top,
              > before covering with canvas/tarps. The roofs are then very
              beautiful.
              >
              > Have you heard of a charama dhu (not sure about spelling)? It is
              a
              > mongolian thing like a yurt, but none of the poles are longer than
              2
              > metres. The sides are made up of triangles of poles, one triangle
              > pointing up, the next down. The roof has longer poles (2mtres
              give
              > you nearly 4 mtre diameter), making triangles from the sides to
              the
              > apex. They are a lot easier to make than a yurt, mostly because
              you
              > don't have to make the central ring. Also, one person can erect
              one
              > by themselves.

              That sounds like the polyogonal compound tent of the Koryaks or
              maybe the tents the Eveni people use. They both use series of
              interlocking alternating triangle formations for the walls/roofs.
              The Koryak's tend to build larger ones than the Eveni I believe so
              need to extend the triangles up to the peak. The Eveni tent is
              usually only about 3-4' tall (wall heigh).

              I working on a book I hope to finish this fall on how to build Yurts
              using aluminum stock for the framing and Tyvek for the covering.
              They make excellent shelters for larger groups as the floor surface
              area gets exponentially larger with small increases in diameter. The
              central roof hole provides ventilation and permits the use of a fire
              or stove inside the tent. They'd make good car camping "tents" but
              are too heavy for normal backpacking use.

              Jim
            • Jeff Walters
              yes - but building one myself is beyond my abilities. We are saving right now for a 30 ft dia Pacific Yurt. We drove down to Cottage Grove Or to see them in
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 17, 2003
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                yes - but building one myself is beyond my abilities.
                We are saving right now for a 30 ft dia Pacific Yurt.
                We drove down to Cottage Grove Or to see them in
                person. The cost of the 30 ft yurt was about 17,000.
                They are very cool. Also, several of the parks here in
                Oregon are using Yurts for cabins..


                ~Jeff
                --- colonelcorn76 <colonelcorn76@...> wrote:
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "alidisaster"
                >
                > <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
                > > Do you find they get hot in the sunny weather?
                >
                > Yurts (Kibitkas) traditionally use a technique of
                > rolling the wall
                > coverings up from the ground to create a convective
                > current that
                > sweeps under the walls up & out through the center
                > vent hole. Also,
                > rather than use a full set of felt coverings, the
                > walls are often
                > just a single layer of felt or even woven reeds.
                > This allows for
                > ventilation while still resulting in privacy.
                >
                > >
                > > There is something magical about the quietness,
                > and light in
                > them.
                > > Most people here make a transparent dome over the
                > central ring,
                > and
                > > it amazing to step into the structure, that looks
                > like it will be
                > > dark, but there is this light flooding down.
                >
                > Properly built you shouldn't need the central ring
                > covering at all.
                > If you leave that off, you get natural currents to
                > ventilate the
                > interior and a small center stove is enough to keep
                > the dwelling
                > warm. The open ring acts as a natural chimney. To
                > keep rain out, the
                > common technique is to offset a cover a foot or two
                > above the
                > central opening that looks like a "hat" on the roof.
                >
                >
                > >
                > > For warmth, it is common over here to put Oriental
                > rugs over the
                > top,
                > > before covering with canvas/tarps. The roofs are
                > then very
                > beautiful.
                > >
                > > Have you heard of a charama dhu (not sure about
                > spelling)? It is
                > a
                > > mongolian thing like a yurt, but none of the poles
                > are longer than
                > 2
                > > metres. The sides are made up of triangles of
                > poles, one triangle
                > > pointing up, the next down. The roof has longer
                > poles (2mtres
                > give
                > > you nearly 4 mtre diameter), making triangles from
                > the sides to
                > the
                > > apex. They are a lot easier to make than a yurt,
                > mostly because
                > you
                > > don't have to make the central ring. Also, one
                > person can erect
                > one
                > > by themselves.
                >
                > That sounds like the polyogonal compound tent of the
                > Koryaks or
                > maybe the tents the Eveni people use. They both use
                > series of
                > interlocking alternating triangle formations for the
                > walls/roofs.
                > The Koryak's tend to build larger ones than the
                > Eveni I believe so
                > need to extend the triangles up to the peak. The
                > Eveni tent is
                > usually only about 3-4' tall (wall heigh).
                >
                > I working on a book I hope to finish this fall on
                > how to build Yurts
                > using aluminum stock for the framing and Tyvek for
                > the covering.
                > They make excellent shelters for larger groups as
                > the floor surface
                > area gets exponentially larger with small increases
                > in diameter. The
                > central roof hole provides ventilation and permits
                > the use of a fire
                > or stove inside the tent. They'd make good car
                > camping "tents" but
                > are too heavy for normal backpacking use.
                >
                > Jim
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


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              • alidisaster
                I don t think that would work in English weather. Lashing rain + winds would equal leakages. Also, you would have the problem of the wind lifting the roof.
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 18, 2003
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                  I don't think that would work in English weather. Lashing rain +
                  winds would equal leakages. Also, you would have the problem of the
                  wind 'lifting' the roof.

                  Normally, people in the UK put a stovepipe up through the roof. This
                  seems to work fine.

                  I can imagine that in dry areas, such as the Mongolian desert, the
                  roof cap wouldn't be needed. But not England!

                  Beautiful as they are, yurts are not really suited to the damp
                  english climate for long-term use. I have friends who have lived in
                  their's for 6 years now - and they are always planning to build
                  something else. The single biggest problem is keeping the fabric
                  dry.


                  > Properly built you shouldn't need the central ring covering at all.
                  > If you leave that off, you get natural currents to ventilate the
                  > interior and a small center stove is enough to keep the dwelling
                  > warm. The open ring acts as a natural chimney. To keep rain out,
                  the
                  > common technique is to offset a cover a foot or two above the
                  > central opening that looks like a "hat" on the roof.
                  >

                  > That sounds like the polyogonal compound tent of the Koryaks or
                  > maybe the tents the Eveni people use. They both use series of
                  > interlocking alternating triangle formations for the walls/roofs.
                  > The Koryak's tend to build larger ones than the Eveni I believe so
                  > need to extend the triangles up to the peak. The Eveni tent is
                  > usually only about 3-4' tall (wall heigh).
                  >
                  The ones we build here tend to have 5' walls and be around 12ft in
                  diameter. Don't know if that is traditional in any way, or just
                  evolved. They are very easy to make - we use copper or plastic water
                  pipe for the ends to make joints.
                  A class of 9-yr-old children at my kid's school are making one.
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