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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail

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  • amendment2@aol.com
    Aside from a few ramps or berries I don t think it is practical. Spend too much time foraging and you won t get far down the trail
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 18, 2007
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      Aside from a few ramps or berries I don't think it is practical. Spend too
      much time foraging and you won't get far down the trail



      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • carl ganong
      Does anyone use Whey powder on there trips for protein and other nutrients? Sailsman ... From: Eric Sandberg To:
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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        Does anyone use Whey powder on there trips for protein and other nutrients?

        Sailsman


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Eric Sandberg <docteric@...>
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, June 18, 2007 10:07:49 PM
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail

        --- In hammockcamping@ yahoogroups. com, "dt king" <whipmaker@. ..> wrote:
        >
        > I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan;
        > fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it's worked
        > well for me. So, it's natural for me to pack the same way.

        I've had some similar thoughts about trail food. I'm not a full vegan,
        but tend to like that style of eating. The nuts and seeds are easy to
        pack, the fruit is easy to dry or buy dried. But what about the
        veges? I've dried them just fine, but I can't eat them like that -
        they turn into little rocks.

        Does anyone know a way to dry or preserve vegetables that doesn't
        require cooking to reconstitute them or have them end up like mush?






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      • Tina Paxton
        I ve been raw vegan for the past year and a half -- although lately I have become high raw meaning I ve allowed some cooked back in (and a small amount of
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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          I've been raw vegan for the past year and a half -- although lately I have
          become "high raw" meaning I've allowed some cooked back in (and a small
          amount of dairy & chicken) but am thinking of going back full raw vegan.
          Anyway, I like not having to worry about cooking food on the trail but it
          does require more prep at home. I'd like to hear more about what food dt
          carries...

          What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
          breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter & honey.
          lunch was: dehydrator-made "sprouted grain bread" with BBQ bean patties made
          with sprouted black lentils and carrots.
          dinner was: that same sprouted grain bread with bean patties made from
          sprouted chickpeas (basically a sprouted hummus dehydrated).
          the trail mix was also (mostly) raw: soaked almonds and sunflower seeds
          coated with nutritional yeast and dehydrated; soynuts (not raw); raisins;
          dried cherries; dried apples; dried papaya; oh, and a cocoction of sprouted
          buckwheat & sprouted rye mixed with soy sauce and seasonings and dehydrated.

          Dehydrated peas as tasty as is, no need to soak them. In comparing the
          weight of my food bag with that of the others on my trip that were using the
          more usual fare revealed that my food was not any heavier than theirs and I
          didn't need to carry a stove. BUT, I do want to get an esbit so I can make
          a hot cup of tea when it's cold.

          I didn't do it this trip, but some other ideas I have that I want to try:
          *fruit leather (easy to make -- pineapple fruit leather is AMAZING)
          *veggie/fruit leather (dehydrating a green smoothie)

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Eric Sandberg" <docteric@...>
          To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, June 18, 2007 10:07 PM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail


          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dt king" <whipmaker@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan;
          >> fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it's worked
          >> well for me. So, it's natural for me to pack the same way.
          >
          > I've had some similar thoughts about trail food. I'm not a full vegan,
          > but tend to like that style of eating. The nuts and seeds are easy to
          > pack, the fruit is easy to dry or buy dried. But what about the
          > veges? I've dried them just fine, but I can't eat them like that -
          > they turn into little rocks.
          >
          > Does anyone know a way to dry or preserve vegetables that doesn't
          > require cooking to reconstitute them or have them end up like mush?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • dt king
          ... but it ... food dt ... Sounds like you have more experience than I do! I know I can live out of the fruit bowl for days, but putting it on my back and
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...> wrote:
            >
            > Anyway, I like not having to worry about cooking food on the trail
            but it
            > does require more prep at home. I'd like to hear more about what
            food dt
            > carries...

            Sounds like you have more experience than I do! I know I can live out
            of the fruit bowl for days, but putting it on my back and carrying it
            around a week is a new world for me.

            My staples at home vary, but typically stuff like apples, baby
            spinach, broccoli, bananas, mangos, avocados, almonds. Seems
            reasonable to start with the fresh version for the first two days and
            go to dried foods after that. I've read some clever sprouting ideas
            I'm going to try out. Not being 100% raw, I'd want my box of ak-mak
            crackers.

            I have no moral objection to boiling up some stone ground whole wheat
            pasta, squirtin' on some balsamic vinegar and olive oil, throwing in
            some soaked sun dried tomatoes. Little sea salt. It's not raw, but
            it's also not a pop tart!
          • Eric Sandberg
            ... honey. First off, I m loving this exchange of ideas. You all are giving me some great thoughts for my next outing. Tina, how do you make the
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
              > breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter &
              honey.


              First off, I'm loving this exchange of ideas. You all are giving me
              some great thoughts for my next outing.

              Tina, how do you make the dehydrater-made breads?

              I have made an "all in one" granola/gorp type meal that works really
              well (except for no veges). I'm not a "raw-fooder" so this is a
              baked item. Recipe:

              4 cu rolled oats, 1 cu toasted coconut, 4 cu wheat flakes, 1 cu
              sliced almonds, 1 cu chopped walnuts, 2 cu sunflower seeds, 4 cu dry
              milk, 0.5 tsp salt, 0.5 cu vegetable oil, 0.5 cu maple syrup (can you
              tell I'm a New Englander?), 1 TBS vanilla extract, 1 cu raisins, and
              1 cu dried cranberries.

              In a large bowl, combine the oats, coconut, wheat, nuts, seeds, and
              milk powder. Mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the salt,
              oil, maple syrup, and vanilla. Pour over dry mixture in bowl,
              stirring and tossing until everything is very well combined.

              Spread on a couple of large lightly greased baking sheets. Bake in a
              preheated 250 degree oven for 2 hours, tossing and stirring mixture
              every 15 minutes or so. Remove pans from oven and cool completely.
              Transfer to a large bowl, and mix in fruit.


              Anyone else have ideas?
            • Tina Paxton
              ... From: dt king To: Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 5:24 PM Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "dt king" <whipmaker@...>
                To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 5:24 PM
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail



                > Sounds like you have more experience than I do! I know I can live out
                > of the fruit bowl for days, but putting it on my back and carrying it
                > around a week is a new world for me.

                Not much experience in actual backpacking experience but I've been learning
                allot about how to make a 100% raw (or high raw) diet as nutritious as
                possible even when I'm out on the trail. I think it's important to have
                good nutrition on the trail.

                > Seems
                > reasonable to start with the fresh version for the first two days and
                > go to dried foods after that. I've read some clever sprouting ideas
                > I'm going to try out. Not being 100% raw, I'd want my box of ak-mak
                > crackers.

                I agree. Sprouting is a great way to max-up the nutrients as a little
                miracle happens when seeds/legumes/etc sprout--their nutrient content
                increases something like 400%.

                > I have no moral objection to boiling up some stone ground whole wheat
                > pasta, squirtin' on some balsamic vinegar and olive oil, throwing in
                > some soaked sun dried tomatoes. Little sea salt. It's not raw, but
                > it's also not a pop tart!

                Hey, as long as it's not SAD (Standard American Diet-->processed junk)
                you're doing great!
              • Tina Paxton
                ... From: Eric Sandberg To: Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 8:36 PM Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Eric Sandberg" <docteric@...>
                  To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 8:36 PM
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail


                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...>
                  > wrote:
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
                  >> breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter &
                  > honey.
                  > Tina, how do you make the dehydrater-made breads?

                  Thanks for the recipe...I'll add it to my "to be tested" list!

                  I don't have an exact recipe, but could come up with one and email it to you
                  next time I make it. For the banana bread I took some very ripe bananas,
                  sprouted buckwheat, sprouted rye, buckwheat flour, and lesser amounts of a
                  combination of other flours such as garbanzo bean, amaranth, almond meal,
                  srogrum flour, flaxseed meal, raisins, cinnamon, and nutmeg. This was mixed
                  well in a food processor until a good consistancy is achieved (not too
                  liquid). Then, I mixed in more raisins. This is spread on solid sheets in
                  the dehydrator, dehydrated at 115degrees for 8 hours, flipped over and off
                  the solid sheets and then dehydrated for another 8 to 10 hours.

                  The other sprouted grain bread uses similar items except instead of bananas
                  and raisins, use zucchini, apples, sun-dried tomatoes and season with Herbs
                  de Provence (or your seasoning of choice). You'll also use some olive oil.
                • quiltpatti
                  This is a very refreshing discusion of trail food, far different than the norm. I m also interested in how Tina makes the dehydrator breads . I ve never had
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 19, 2007
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                    This is a very refreshing discusion of trail food, far different
                    than the norm. I'm also interested in how Tina makes the
                    dehydrator "breads".
                    I've never had spouted grains or beans other than alfalfa of mung.
                    Do they taste good or is that an "aquired taste"? Does someone have
                    a good reference for such fare?
                    Sun-dried tomatoes were mentioned. I really prefer dehydrating fresh
                    ripe tomatoes sliced 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick and sprinkled with dried
                    good-with-tomato herbs, until crisp. The flavor is intense,
                    tomatoie, and make good tomato chips or crackers.

                    Patti

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg"
                    <docteric@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
                    > > breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter &
                    > honey.
                    >
                    >
                    > First off, I'm loving this exchange of ideas. You all are giving
                    me
                    > some great thoughts for my next outing.
                    >
                    > Tina, how do you make the dehydrater-made breads?
                    >
                    > I have made an "all in one" granola/gorp type meal that works
                    really
                    > well (except for no veges). I'm not a "raw-fooder" so this is a
                    > baked item. Recipe:
                    >
                    > 4 cu rolled oats, 1 cu toasted coconut, 4 cu wheat flakes, 1 cu
                    > sliced almonds, 1 cu chopped walnuts, 2 cu sunflower seeds, 4 cu
                    dry
                    > milk, 0.5 tsp salt, 0.5 cu vegetable oil, 0.5 cu maple syrup (can
                    you
                    > tell I'm a New Englander?), 1 TBS vanilla extract, 1 cu raisins,
                    and
                    > 1 cu dried cranberries.
                    >
                    > In a large bowl, combine the oats, coconut, wheat, nuts, seeds,
                    and
                    > milk powder. Mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the
                    salt,
                    > oil, maple syrup, and vanilla. Pour over dry mixture in bowl,
                    > stirring and tossing until everything is very well combined.
                    >
                    > Spread on a couple of large lightly greased baking sheets. Bake
                    in a
                    > preheated 250 degree oven for 2 hours, tossing and stirring
                    mixture
                    > every 15 minutes or so. Remove pans from oven and cool
                    completely.
                    > Transfer to a large bowl, and mix in fruit.
                    >
                    >
                    > Anyone else have ideas?
                    >
                  • C C Wayah
                    Patti Many seeds can be sprouted and taste yummy. Cantaloupe seed are a bit sweet when sprouted. I suggest doing a Google search for sprouting seeds. I think
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jun 20, 2007
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                      Patti
                      Many seeds can be sprouted and taste yummy.
                      Cantaloupe seed are a bit sweet when sprouted.
                      I suggest doing a Google search for sprouting seeds.
                      I think you will find a gazillion pages of information on this
                      to choose from.
                      Rogene

                      Tina please do share your dehydrator breads with us.
                      Do you just slice regular baked goods then dehydrate
                      or cook the breads wtih the dehydrator?
                    • Tina Paxton
                      www.sproutpeople.com ...they have lots of information and recipes. Sproutman is good too and has a couple books with info, how-tos, and recipes. Each seed or
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jun 20, 2007
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                        www.sproutpeople.com ...they have lots of information and recipes.
                        Sproutman is good too and has a couple books with info, how-tos, and
                        recipes.

                        Each seed or grain has a different flavor so part of it is finding what you
                        like. Some legumes are edible at the sprouted stage, others still need to
                        be cooked after sprouting but the sprouting is still beneficial for
                        increasing the nutrients. Sproutpeople have a sample pack you can get that
                        is good for experimenting and seeing what you like and don't like before you
                        buy in larger quantities.

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "quiltpatti" <quiltbinder@...>
                        To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 10:19 PM
                        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail


                        > This is a very refreshing discusion of trail food, far different
                        > than the norm. I'm also interested in how Tina makes the
                        > dehydrator "breads".
                        > I've never had spouted grains or beans other than alfalfa of mung.
                        > Do they taste good or is that an "aquired taste"? Does someone have
                        > a good reference for such fare?
                        > Sun-dried tomatoes were mentioned. I really prefer dehydrating fresh
                        > ripe tomatoes sliced 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick and sprinkled with dried
                        > good-with-tomato herbs, until crisp. The flavor is intense,
                        > tomatoie, and make good tomato chips or crackers.
                        >
                        > Patti
                        >
                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg"
                        > <docteric@...> wrote:
                        >>
                        >> --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@>
                        >> wrote:
                        >> >
                        >> >
                        >> > What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
                        >> > breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter &
                        >> honey.
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> First off, I'm loving this exchange of ideas. You all are giving
                        > me
                        >> some great thoughts for my next outing.
                        >>
                        >> Tina, how do you make the dehydrater-made breads?
                        >>
                        >> I have made an "all in one" granola/gorp type meal that works
                        > really
                        >> well (except for no veges). I'm not a "raw-fooder" so this is a
                        >> baked item. Recipe:
                        >>
                        >> 4 cu rolled oats, 1 cu toasted coconut, 4 cu wheat flakes, 1 cu
                        >> sliced almonds, 1 cu chopped walnuts, 2 cu sunflower seeds, 4 cu
                        > dry
                        >> milk, 0.5 tsp salt, 0.5 cu vegetable oil, 0.5 cu maple syrup (can
                        > you
                        >> tell I'm a New Englander?), 1 TBS vanilla extract, 1 cu raisins,
                        > and
                        >> 1 cu dried cranberries.
                        >>
                        >> In a large bowl, combine the oats, coconut, wheat, nuts, seeds,
                        > and
                        >> milk powder. Mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the
                        > salt,
                        >> oil, maple syrup, and vanilla. Pour over dry mixture in bowl,
                        >> stirring and tossing until everything is very well combined.
                        >>
                        >> Spread on a couple of large lightly greased baking sheets. Bake
                        > in a
                        >> preheated 250 degree oven for 2 hours, tossing and stirring
                        > mixture
                        >> every 15 minutes or so. Remove pans from oven and cool
                        > completely.
                        >> Transfer to a large bowl, and mix in fruit.
                        >>
                        >>
                        >> Anyone else have ideas?
                        >>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Tina Paxton
                        ... From: C C Wayah To: Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 6:26 AM Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jun 20, 2007
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                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "C C Wayah" <ccwayah@...>
                          To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2007 6:26 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Raw Trail


                          >
                          > Tina please do share your dehydrator breads with us.
                          > Do you just slice regular baked goods then dehydrate
                          > or cook the breads wtih the dehydrator?

                          No, I don't dehydrated baked bread. This dehydrator bread qualifies as a
                          "raw" food which means it has not been heated above 118degrees. The
                          dehydrator "cooks" it (I set my dehydrator at 115). Here is the recipe that
                          is the starting point for my breads but as I mentioned in another post, I
                          play with the ingredients quite a bit--mixing up the flours, adding sprouted
                          grains, and changing out the fruits/veggies/seasonings. Once you have the
                          general idea of what you are trying to achieve, it's easy to change it up.


                          Mediterranean Almond Bread

                          Makes 18 'slices'

                          1/2c olive oil
                          1c sun dried tomatoes, loosely packed
                          3c almond flour*
                          1c flax meal
                          3 medium courgettes (zucchini), peeled & roughly chopped
                          2 apples, cored and roughly chopped
                          3T lemon juice
                          1t salt
                          3T Herbs De Provence or herbs of your choice
                          2T marjoram or herbs of your choice

                          *You can make almond flour a number of ways. My favourite is to save the
                          pulp from any almond milk I make and dehydrate it so I can keep it in a
                          glass jar until needed. You could also use the almond pulp wet. Another
                          way would be just to grind some almonds into flour in a high powered blender
                          or coffee mill.

                          - Process the olive oil, sun dried toms, courgette, apple, lemon juice, salt
                          and dried herbs until thoroughly mixed.

                          - Add the almond flour and process again until a batter is formed.

                          - In a bowl mix the batter with the flax meal by hand. The reason you do
                          this separately (not in the processor) is that you are likely to have too
                          much mixture for the size if the processor at this point, and when you add
                          the flax meal it will become quite heavy and sticky and overwork your
                          machine.

                          - When mixed, process the whole batter in the machine again in small batches
                          to achieve a light fluffy texture.

                          - Divide the mixture in 2 and place on Paraflexx sheets, on dehydrator
                          trays.

                          - Use an offset spatula (aka offset palette knife or cranked palette knife)
                          to spread the mixture evenly to all 4 sides and corners of the Paraflexx
                          sheet. If mixture is too sticky you can wet the spatula to make things
                          easier. With a knife score the whole thing into 9 squares.

                          - Dehydrate for 2 hours and then remove the Paraflexx sheets by placing
                          another dehydrator tray and mesh on top and invert so that your original
                          sheet of bread is upside down. That will allow you to peel the Paralexx
                          sheet off and continue to dehydrate the underside of the bread.

                          - Dehydrate for approx 8 hours more (do this overnight so you're not tempted
                          to eat it before it's ready) or until bread feels light in your hand. If
                          the pieces don't fully come apart where you scored, use a knife to cut them.
                        • Mike
                          I m allergic to wheat. Would this recipe work with corn or rice Chex instead of the wheat flakes? It sounds delicious! ... [Non-text portions of this message
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 20, 2007
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                            I'm allergic to wheat. Would this recipe work with corn or rice Chex instead
                            of the wheat flakes? It sounds delicious!

                            On 6/19/07, Eric Sandberg <docteric@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>,
                            > "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > What I did for my recent (first) adventure in backpacking:
                            > > breakfast was: dehydrater-made "banana bread" with nut butter &
                            > honey.
                            >
                            > First off, I'm loving this exchange of ideas. You all are giving me
                            > some great thoughts for my next outing.
                            >
                            > Tina, how do you make the dehydrater-made breads?
                            >
                            > I have made an "all in one" granola/gorp type meal that works really
                            > well (except for no veges). I'm not a "raw-fooder" so this is a
                            > baked item. Recipe:
                            >
                            > 4 cu rolled oats, 1 cu toasted coconut, 4 cu wheat flakes, 1 cu
                            > sliced almonds, 1 cu chopped walnuts, 2 cu sunflower seeds, 4 cu dry
                            > milk, 0.5 tsp salt, 0.5 cu vegetable oil, 0.5 cu maple syrup (can you
                            > tell I'm a New Englander?), 1 TBS vanilla extract, 1 cu raisins, and
                            > 1 cu dried cranberries.
                            >
                            > In a large bowl, combine the oats, coconut, wheat, nuts, seeds, and
                            > milk powder. Mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the salt,
                            > oil, maple syrup, and vanilla. Pour over dry mixture in bowl,
                            > stirring and tossing until everything is very well combined.
                            >
                            > Spread on a couple of large lightly greased baking sheets. Bake in a
                            > preheated 250 degree oven for 2 hours, tossing and stirring mixture
                            > every 15 minutes or so. Remove pans from oven and cool completely.
                            > Transfer to a large bowl, and mix in fruit.
                            >
                            > Anyone else have ideas?
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • C C Wayah
                            ... Thanks Tina for sharing such good recopies for dehydrating. Rogene
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jun 20, 2007
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                              >

                              >
                              > No, I don't dehydrated baked bread. This dehydrator bread qualifies as a
                              > "raw" food

                              Thanks Tina for sharing such good recopies for dehydrating.
                              Rogene
                            • Eric Sandberg
                              ... instead ... I ve never tried it, but it s sure worth a try. I don t see why it wouldn t work. The wheat flakes I use are not from regular breakfast
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jun 21, 2007
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                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Mike <madmo453@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I'm allergic to wheat. Would this recipe work with corn or rice Chex
                                instead
                                > of the wheat flakes? It sounds delicious!
                                >

                                I've never tried it, but it's sure worth a try. I don't see why it
                                wouldn't work. The wheat flakes I use are not from regular breakfast
                                cereal (Total, etc). They're rolled wheat, more like the rolled oats
                                for oatmeal. Of course you could always just substitute the wheat for
                                more oatmeal if you like.
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