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Raw Trail

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  • dt king
    I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan; fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it s worked well for me. So, it s
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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      I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan;
      fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it's worked
      well for me. So, it's natural for me to pack the same way.

      Margaret Mead said, "It's easier to change a man's religion than his
      diet". So, I'm sure not going to go there. But just throwing out a
      few ideas to see what bounces back...

      Advantages:

      You don't have to cook; don't have to carry a stove.
      Easier cleanup.
      Less body odor without the meat and dairy.
      No cooking scent to attract four or two leg critters.
      Foraging on the trail isn't as much of a shock to your digestive system.
      Complex carbs are easily available to your body for sustained energy.
      Not as attractive to biting bugs.

      Disadvantages:

      Hot foods are body warming on cold days.
      Fresh food weighs more -- though it does count against your water weight.
    • hacktorious
      Foraging on the trail That is a very interesting topic, does anyone actually do this? I would be very interested in learning more about this topic. -- Scott
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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        "Foraging on the trail"

        That is a very interesting topic, does anyone actually do this? I
        would be very interested in learning more about this topic.

        --
        Scott
      • Eric Sandberg
        ... I ve had some similar thoughts about trail food. I m not a full vegan, but tend to like that style of eating. The nuts and seeds are easy to pack, the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dt king" <whipmaker@...> wrote:
          >
          > I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan;
          > fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it's worked
          > well for me. So, it's natural for me to pack the same way.

          I've had some similar thoughts about trail food. I'm not a full vegan,
          but tend to like that style of eating. The nuts and seeds are easy to
          pack, the fruit is easy to dry or buy dried. But what about the
          veges? I've dried them just fine, but I can't eat them like that -
          they turn into little rocks.

          Does anyone know a way to dry or preserve vegetables that doesn't
          require cooking to reconstitute them or have them end up like mush?
        • aethericpower
          ... I have eaten dandelion flowers, mustard flowers, nibbled on fresh and green Russian thistle (tumble weed), and wood sorrel(three leaf clover). I also found
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "hacktorious" <hacktorious@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > "Foraging on the trail"
            >
            > That is a very interesting topic, does anyone actually do this? I
            > would be very interested in learning more about this topic.
            >
            > --
            > Scott
            >

            I have eaten dandelion flowers, mustard flowers, nibbled on fresh and
            green Russian thistle (tumble weed), and wood sorrel(three leaf
            clover). I also found some wild grape. Pig weed is suppose to be
            edible but I have not tried it yet.

            Though they are all edible and a source of vitamins, I can not see
            living off of it. After a certain point of eating it, like a protien
            bar, you really just want to stop.

            I suppose if I found sources of starchy roots, and or nuts and seeds.
            It might be possible to live off of it, with enough effort( several
            hours of foraging.) The problem with nuts like acorns, they need to be
            subject to a process of soaking in water for days or weeks to remove
            tannins. Starchy roots need to be cooked like a potatoe, back with the
            stove.

            There also tends to be surups, jellies, and ciders talked about in
            edible plant books. Those require preparation but I think they could
            provide more calories. Medicinal properties of plants are also
            covered, like the ability of lemon to be an anti-septic (germ killer).


            If you really needed to, I think sushi might give you needed calories
            that the shrubs would not. I heard stories of ferral children living
            off birds, rabbits, and frogs. Pigeons use to be a food source. Eggs
            are a good source of protein and calories. I have not hunted these
            meat sources so I can not give you any practical advise on them.

            Some general aspects of foraging. New growing parts of the plants are
            the parts to eat. Newly green leaves, flowers if there are any, roses
            are edible, seeds tend to pack a lot of nutrients and grass grains are
            suppose to be edible and much of the aster family (sunflower,
            dandilion, many pettals) are edible. If the flower already bloomed and
            leaves fell off, winter, dig for the roots for nutrients.

            I haven't done much, and I would not consider myself an expert, but I
            have eaten some and know a few more.
          • dt king
            ... The veggies I ve actually had through my dehydrator came out as more of a snack chip -- potatoes, peppers, eggplant, broccoli. Some veggies, like the
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg" <docteric@...>
              wrote:

              > Does anyone know a way to dry or preserve vegetables that doesn't
              > require cooking to reconstitute them or have them end up like mush?

              The veggies I've actually had through my dehydrator came out as more
              of a snack chip -- potatoes, peppers, eggplant, broccoli. Some
              veggies, like the eggplant, are better marinated before drying.

              I believe in many cases it's better to dehydrate your own.
              Commercially dehydrated foods are often dried at high temperatures and
              have scary preservatives in them. Stuff like raisins and dates I get
              off the snack aisle. It's easy to buy sun dried tomatoes.

              Can't dry avocados, but I'll bet they're worth their weight for the
              fat content.

              I'm not an expert on foraging, but I think there are some foods that
              worth a quick break to gather and eat, if only to avoid one detour
              into the next town for resupply. I'm currently reading Foraging in
              New England by Tom Seymour. Seems like more practical information
              than the typical field guides; and I live in New England, so that
              works for me.
            • quiltpatti
              I like to dehydrate grated raw carrots. They rehydrate with cold water and taste just like grated raw carrots. Good plain, mixed with peanut butter, or hummus,
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 18, 2007
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                I like to dehydrate grated raw carrots. They rehydrate with cold
                water and taste just like grated raw carrots. Good plain, mixed with
                peanut butter, or hummus, or maybe with peanuts and raisins. Also
                like to dehydrate raw broccoli-slaw (found bagged in produce dept).
                Rehydrates with cold water, too. I like to mix it with mayo, peanuts
                and raisins, for a fresh lunch salad.

                dt, what kind of raw veggies are you carrying? and how long do they
                keep/stay eddible? Seems like raw food for several days would be
                quite heavy.

                Patti

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg"
                <docteric@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dt king" <whipmaker@>
                wrote:
                > >
                > > I enjoy an occasional meat dish, but my usual fare is raw vegan;
                > > fruits, veggies, seeds, nuts. Started last summer and it's
                worked
                > > well for me. So, it's natural for me to pack the same way.
                >
                > I've had some similar thoughts about trail food. I'm not a full
                vegan,
                > but tend to like that style of eating. The nuts and seeds are
                easy to
                > pack, the fruit is easy to dry or buy dried. But what about the
                > veges? I've dried them just fine, but I can't eat them like that -

                > they turn into little rocks.
                >
                > Does anyone know a way to dry or preserve vegetables that doesn't
                > require cooking to reconstitute them or have them end up like mush?
                >
              • Richard Perlman
                ... I like to nibble on Wood Sorrel. It has a nice sour taste, almost like a granny smith apple. http://2bnthewild.com/plants/H41.htm A scouting High
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 19, 2007
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                  dt king wrote:
                  > I'm not an expert on foraging, but I think there are some foods that
                  > worth a quick break to gather and eat, if only to avoid one detour
                  > into the next town for resupply. I'm currently reading Foraging in
                  > New England by Tom Seymour. Seems like more practical information
                  > than the typical field guides; and I live in New England, so that
                  > works for me.
                  >
                  I like to nibble on Wood Sorrel. It has a nice sour taste, almost like
                  a granny smith apple.
                  http://2bnthewild.com/plants/H41.htm
                  A scouting High Adventure guide pointed it out to me on a trek in the
                  Adirondacks. Now I notice
                  it in my front yard.

                  Not that I'd make a meal out of it, though. It contains oxalic acid
                  which is toxic in very large doses.

                  Rich
                • docteric
                  ... dt, How did you dry the veges so they came out as chips? Did you slice them into chip shapes? I d be interested in vege chips.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 27, 2007
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                    >
                    > The veggies I've actually had through my dehydrator came out as more
                    > of a snack chip -- potatoes, peppers, eggplant, broccoli. Some
                    > veggies, like the eggplant, are better marinated before drying.


                    dt,

                    How did you dry the veges so they came out as chips? Did you slice
                    them into chip shapes? I'd be interested in vege chips.
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