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First hammock camping experience

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  • Tina Paxton
    Hello, This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
    Message 1 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
      Hello,

      This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
      Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
      several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
      them out.

      1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
      necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the hammock
      and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as demonstrated
      on the HH website.

      2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
      websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
      issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the bottom
      entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
      Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though, I
      have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)

      I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
      the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.
    • Carey Parks
      Others with more experience will reply I m sure, but for me the sag is cured by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension to be
      Message 2 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
        Others with more experience will reply I'm sure, but for me the sag is cured
        by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension to
        be ties so tight to keep the hammock of the ground. The ridgeline will
        control your hang (to a point). If you tie the hammock lines low so you have
        to have them straight as a board to hang, you are putting a WHOLE LOT of
        force on the lines. By whole lot I mean something like 800 lbs. There a
        spreadsheet in the files section that will give you the exact force for
        various weights and angles. Also, the first time you use your hammock things
        will stretch more than when it's been used a few times. But hanging with the
        lines hanging at about 30 degrees works for me.

        As for being chilly, I use my thermarest. I take it along because it's the
        "frame" for my G4 backpack, a great sit spot for breaks, and it keeps me
        warm at night on the ground or in the hammock. I also use multiple layers of
        fleece blanket when it's warm - like maybe 70 degrees? and I still want
        something to keep me warm where I press on the hammock. My shoulders
        sometimes get cool because they hang off the pad, and i stick my pot cozy
        foam under my shoulders (it's 2 pieces). They actually stay there all night.
        I don't need to toss in my hammock like I do in my bed.

        Cheers,

        Carey

        -----Original Message-----
        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Tina Paxton
        Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 6:14 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience


        Hello,

        This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
        Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
        several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
        them out.

        1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
        necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the
        hammock
        and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as demonstrated
        on the HH website.

        2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
        websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
        issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the
        bottom
        entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
        Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though, I
        have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)

        I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
        the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • tim garner
        tina... what carey said is good info. especially note what was said about the new hammock, supports, & tree huggers stretching. that s going to happen. but
        Message 3 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
          tina... what carey said is good info. especially note what was said about the new hammock, supports, & tree huggers stretching. that's going to happen. but after you use it a time or two there will be very little stretching.
          most people begin to need some kind of insulation on bottom around 70°f or so. but like carey said, a pad of some sort may be all it takes.
          you may want to take a look at the segmented pad extender (SPE) on the speer hammock site. it's an inexpensive yet effective way to not only use your pad to insulate you on the bottom, but also give you insulation from the cool night air on the sides too.
          you probably noticed how you felt the cold when your shoulders, hips, arms, back side, etc pressed against the hammock. the SPE will separate you from that. ...tim

          Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
          Others with more experience will reply I'm sure, but for me the sag is cured
          by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension to
          be ties so tight to keep the hammock of the ground. The ridgeline will
          control your hang (to a point). If you tie the hammock lines low so you have
          to have them straight as a board to hang, you are putting a WHOLE LOT of
          force on the lines. By whole lot I mean something like 800 lbs. There a
          spreadsheet in the files section that will give you the exact force for
          various weights and angles. Also, the first time you use your hammock things
          will stretch more than when it's been used a few times. But hanging with the
          lines hanging at about 30 degrees works for me.

          As for being chilly, I use my thermarest. I take it along because it's the
          "frame" for my G4 backpack, a great sit spot for breaks, and it keeps me
          warm at night on the ground or in the hammock. I also use multiple layers of
          fleece blanket when it's warm - like maybe 70 degrees? and I still want
          something to keep me warm where I press on the hammock. My shoulders
          sometimes get cool because they hang off the pad, and i stick my pot cozy
          foam under my shoulders (it's 2 pieces). They actually stay there all night.
          I don't need to toss in my hammock like I do in my bed.

          Cheers,

          Carey



          don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


          ---------------------------------
          Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user panel and lay it on us.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tina Paxton
          So, I need to put the tree hugger up higher to get a better angle? That s easy enough. :-) I did review the SPE on Speer s site and it seems like a better
          Message 4 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
            So, I need to put the tree hugger up higher to get a better angle? That's
            easy enough. :-) I did review the SPE on Speer's site and it seems like a
            better option for me as I think I'll still want to adjust (move around) in
            the hammock...I found that my muscles still tended to cramp up if I stayed
            in the same position too long. I don't think the narrower pads (aka
            Thermarest) would work very well for me.

            Oh, and looking at the photos in the file it looks like ya'll also stow your
            backpacks by hanging them on the ridgeline? I was wondering what to do with
            my gear....

            If you can't tell...not only am I a novice hammocker, I'm also a novice
            backpacker...last weekend was my first official backpacking trip. I look
            forward to many more. :-)

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "tim garner" <slowhike@...>
            To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 7:56 PM
            Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience


            tina... what carey said is good info. especially note what was said about
            the new hammock, supports, & tree huggers stretching. that's going to
            happen. but after you use it a time or two there will be very little
            stretching.
            most people begin to need some kind of insulation on bottom around 70°f
            or so. but like carey said, a pad of some sort may be all it takes.
            you may want to take a look at the segmented pad extender (SPE) on
            the speer hammock site. it's an inexpensive yet effective way to not only
            use your pad to insulate you on the bottom, but also give you insulation
            from the cool night air on the sides too.
            you probably noticed how you felt the cold when your shoulders, hips,
            arms, back side, etc pressed against the hammock. the SPE will separate you
            from that. ...tim

            Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
            Others with more experience will reply I'm sure, but for me the sag is
            cured
            by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension to
            be ties so tight to keep the hammock of the ground. The ridgeline will
            control your hang (to a point). If you tie the hammock lines low so you have
            to have them straight as a board to hang, you are putting a WHOLE LOT of
            force on the lines. By whole lot I mean something like 800 lbs. There a
            spreadsheet in the files section that will give you the exact force for
            various weights and angles. Also, the first time you use your hammock things
            will stretch more than when it's been used a few times. But hanging with the
            lines hanging at about 30 degrees works for me.

            As for being chilly, I use my thermarest. I take it along because it's the
            "frame" for my G4 backpack, a great sit spot for breaks, and it keeps me
            warm at night on the ground or in the hammock. I also use multiple layers of
            fleece blanket when it's warm - like maybe 70 degrees? and I still want
            something to keep me warm where I press on the hammock. My shoulders
            sometimes get cool because they hang off the pad, and i stick my pot cozy
            foam under my shoulders (it's 2 pieces). They actually stay there all night.
            I don't need to toss in my hammock like I do in my bed.

            Cheers,

            Carey



            don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


            ---------------------------------
            Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user panel
            and lay it on us.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Carey Parks
            Welcome Tina, You re in for lots of fine adventures and good friends. Safe travels, Carey ... From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
              Welcome Tina,

              You're in for lots of fine adventures and good friends.

              Safe travels,

              Carey


              -----Original Message-----
              From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Tina Paxton
              Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 8:27 PM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience


              So, I need to put the tree hugger up higher to get a better angle? That's
              easy enough. :-) I did review the SPE on Speer's site and it seems like a
              better option for me as I think I'll still want to adjust (move around) in
              the hammock...I found that my muscles still tended to cramp up if I stayed
              in the same position too long. I don't think the narrower pads (aka
              Thermarest) would work very well for me.

              Oh, and looking at the photos in the file it looks like ya'll also stow
              your
              backpacks by hanging them on the ridgeline? I was wondering what to do
              with
              my gear....

              If you can't tell...not only am I a novice hammocker, I'm also a novice
              backpacker...last weekend was my first official backpacking trip. I look
              forward to many more. :-)

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "tim garner" <slowhike@...>
              To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 7:56 PM
              Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience

              tina... what carey said is good info. especially note what was said about
              the new hammock, supports, & tree huggers stretching. that's going to
              happen. but after you use it a time or two there will be very little
              stretching.
              most people begin to need some kind of insulation on bottom around 70°f
              or so. but like carey said, a pad of some sort may be all it takes.
              you may want to take a look at the segmented pad extender (SPE) on
              the speer hammock site. it's an inexpensive yet effective way to not only
              use your pad to insulate you on the bottom, but also give you insulation
              from the cool night air on the sides too.
              you probably noticed how you felt the cold when your shoulders, hips,
              arms, back side, etc pressed against the hammock. the SPE will separate
              you
              from that. ...tim

              Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
              Others with more experience will reply I'm sure, but for me the sag is
              cured
              by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension
              to
              be ties so tight to keep the hammock of the ground. The ridgeline will
              control your hang (to a point). If you tie the hammock lines low so you
              have
              to have them straight as a board to hang, you are putting a WHOLE LOT of
              force on the lines. By whole lot I mean something like 800 lbs. There a
              spreadsheet in the files section that will give you the exact force for
              various weights and angles. Also, the first time you use your hammock
              things
              will stretch more than when it's been used a few times. But hanging with
              the
              lines hanging at about 30 degrees works for me.

              As for being chilly, I use my thermarest. I take it along because it's the
              "frame" for my G4 backpack, a great sit spot for breaks, and it keeps me
              warm at night on the ground or in the hammock. I also use multiple layers
              of
              fleece blanket when it's warm - like maybe 70 degrees? and I still want
              something to keep me warm where I press on the hammock. My shoulders
              sometimes get cool because they hang off the pad, and i stick my pot cozy
              foam under my shoulders (it's 2 pieces). They actually stay there all
              night.
              I don't need to toss in my hammock like I do in my bed.

              Cheers,

              Carey

              don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!

              ---------------------------------
              Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user
              panel
              and lay it on us.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              Yahoo! Groups Links






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Scott
              My personal choice is to use an under quilt. I was using a JRB nest, and started using that as an over quilt, so I decided to get a super shelter. You can
              Message 6 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
                My personal choice is to use an under quilt. I was using a JRB nest, and
                started using that as an over quilt, so I decided to get a super shelter.
                You can read my review on my blog at www.HikeHaven.com.

                I've recently decided to get a Potomac under
                quilt<http://www.kickassquilts.com/>.
                Though I have not received it yet, I am certain I will be satisfied. I have
                heard nothing, but great things about this quilt. It is reasonably priced
                too. The JRB quilts are great, but are more expensive. I like the idea of
                using synthetic on the bottom and down on the top. I believe the synthetic
                wicks water better.

                Either way, I am 100% satisfied with my JRB quilt and would consider getting
                a second. Some day I am sure I will. I highly recommend checking them out.

                I don't like using pads in my Hennessey because they move around too much
                and they end up moving out from under me. As a result I end up waking up
                and being cold. Pads work better in hammocks that hug your body like a
                Speer. Though, my preference is still an under quilt.

                If you have some money, the
                snugfit<http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SnugFit.htm>looks great,
                and is likely worth every penny. As far as I understand it
                will work fine on a Hennessey.

                --
                Scott
                www.AntiFuel.com
                www.HikeHaven.com

                Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.

                On 6/14/07, Tina Paxton <Frecs@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello,
                >
                > This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
                > Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
                >
                > several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
                > them out.
                >
                > 1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
                >
                > necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the
                > hammock
                > and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as demonstrated
                >
                > on the HH website.
                >
                > 2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
                > websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
                > issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the
                > bottom
                > entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
                > Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though, I
                >
                > have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)
                >
                > I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
                > the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • tim garner
                i aggree, the underquilt seems to be the best overall solution for most people. and i ve tested the snug fit underquilt. it s great! another source for
                Message 7 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
                  i aggree, the underquilt seems to be the best overall solution for most people.
                  and i've tested the snug fit underquilt. it's great!
                  another source for questions about storing your pack & stuff is hammockforums.net.

                  Scott <hacktorious@...> wrote:
                  My personal choice is to use an under quilt. I was using a JRB nest, and
                  started using that as an over quilt, so I decided to get a super shelter.
                  You can read my review on my blog at www.HikeHaven.com.

                  I've recently decided to get a Potomac under
                  quilt.
                  Though I have not received it yet, I am certain I will be satisfied. I have
                  heard nothing, but great things about this quilt. It is reasonably priced
                  too. The JRB quilts are great, but are more expensive. I like the idea of
                  using synthetic on the bottom and down on the top. I believe the synthetic
                  wicks water better.

                  Either way, I am 100% satisfied with my JRB quilt and would consider getting
                  a second. Some day I am sure I will. I highly recommend checking them out.

                  I don't like using pads in my Hennessey because they move around too much
                  and they end up moving out from under me. As a result I end up waking up
                  and being cold. Pads work better in hammocks that hug your body like a
                  Speer. Though, my preference is still an under quilt.

                  If you have some money, the
                  snugfitlooks great,
                  and is likely worth every penny. As far as I understand it
                  will work fine on a Hennessey.

                  --
                  Scott
                  www.AntiFuel.com
                  www.HikeHaven.com

                  Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.

                  On 6/14/07, Tina Paxton wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello,
                  >
                  > This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
                  > Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
                  >
                  > several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
                  > them out.
                  >
                  > 1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
                  >
                  > necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the
                  > hammock
                  > and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as demonstrated
                  >
                  > on the HH website.
                  >
                  > 2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
                  > websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
                  > issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the
                  > bottom
                  > entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
                  > Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though, I
                  >
                  > have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)
                  >
                  > I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
                  > the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                  Yahoo! Groups Links






                  don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


                  ---------------------------------
                  Don't pick lemons.
                  See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • chcoa
                  Welcome Tina, You are certainly asking the right bunch of people. Tons of hammocking knowledge around here. Although I m not one of the ultra knowledgeable
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jun 14, 2007
                    Welcome Tina,

                    You are certainly asking the right bunch of people. Tons of
                    hammocking knowledge around here. Although I'm not one of the ultra
                    knowledgeable ones I'm refering to I thought I'd toss my suggestions
                    in regarding your cold back issue. I used to have an HH and had
                    simular problems.

                    Basically the two most common solutions are underquilt of some kind
                    or sleeping on a pad inside the hammock. I found the latter was
                    much cheaper and versitile(sit pad around camp, pack frame, etc..
                    but less comfortable. HAving the pad in the hammock does, in my
                    opinion, detract from the comfy lay of the hammock. It's still far
                    more comfortable than the ground but not as sweat as in the hammock
                    alone.

                    Hope that helps.
                    Jamie in AZ

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello,
                    >
                    > This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original
                    Hennessy
                    > Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I
                    discovered
                    > several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help
                    me work
                    > them out.
                    >
                    > 1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I
                    found it
                    > necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into
                    the hammock
                    > and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as
                    demonstrated
                    > on the HH website.
                    >
                    > 2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked
                    at some
                    > websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing
                    with this
                    > issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with
                    the bottom
                    > entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring
                    through early
                    > Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night.
                    (Though, I
                    > have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also
                    cold.)
                    >
                    > I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many
                    trips in
                    > the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.
                    >
                  • dt king
                    ... I called to order my Hennessy Desert Rat recently; Tom answered the phone. After taking my order, he gave me some usage recommendations. ... The knots
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I discovered
                      > several issues that I need to resolve....
                      >

                      I called to order my Hennessy Desert Rat recently; Tom answered the
                      phone. After taking my order, he gave me some usage recommendations.

                      > 1. Tightening the ridgeline

                      The knots settle the first few times you use the hammock. It'll
                      stretch less after a while.

                      > 2. Cold.

                      Those silver mylar laminated foam windshield covers as a pad. I got
                      some at the dollar store.

                      He also told me how to get into the hammock, but you probably have
                      that down, by now. If you got trees near your house, wouldn't hurt to
                      try a few things overnight before you're out in the wilderness.

                      I'm I the only one who had trouble kicking the velcro apart? For a
                      couple of minutes, I was wondering if I'd be trapped in a nylon cocoon
                      in the park.

                      David King
                    • Richard Perlman
                      Tina, I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest 25 x 72 x 2 pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer PeaPod, Speer
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                        Tina,

                        I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest 25" x
                        72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer PeaPod, Speer
                        TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my disposal are 20* and 35* down
                        sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.

                        When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I can
                        remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With that I
                        use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the temperature, I
                        add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the PeaPod for
                        extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                        clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon pullover
                        and pants. Nothing beats waking up for a cold weather bio break wearing
                        half your "sleeping bag"!

                        When it's warm and buggy, I use a Hennessey Hyperlight Backpacker Asym
                        with the JRB Shenandoah underneath. Inside I use the TopBlanket. Many
                        warm nights, it stays tucked up between the ridge line and bug netting.

                        The only thing I miss about the pad is that it would kind of hold the
                        hammock open a bit and the fabric would not rest directly against your
                        face. The trade off is WELL worth it!

                        Regardless of which hammock I hang in, I use my Speer 8' x 10' silnylon
                        fly overhead in bad weather. I like the extra coverage available, not
                        afforded by the Hennessey fly. That said, I always string a "clothes
                        line" under the fly. Everything, including my pack, gets 'bienered to or
                        draped over the line. The only thing on the ground are my Crocs.

                        Enjoy your new found hobby!

                        Rich

                        Tina Paxton wrote:
                        > So, I need to put the tree hugger up higher to get a better angle? That's
                        > easy enough. :-) I did review the SPE on Speer's site and it seems like a
                        > better option for me as I think I'll still want to adjust (move around) in
                        > the hammock...I found that my muscles still tended to cramp up if I stayed
                        > in the same position too long. I don't think the narrower pads (aka
                        > Thermarest) would work very well for me.
                        >
                        > Oh, and looking at the photos in the file it looks like ya'll also stow your
                        > backpacks by hanging them on the ridgeline? I was wondering what to do with
                        > my gear....
                        >
                        > If you can't tell...not only am I a novice hammocker, I'm also a novice
                        > backpacker...last weekend was my first official backpacking trip. I look
                        > forward to many more. :-)
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "tim garner" <slowhike@...>
                        > To: <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Thursday, June 14, 2007 7:56 PM
                        > Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience
                        >
                        >
                        > tina... what carey said is good info. especially note what was said about
                        > the new hammock, supports, & tree huggers stretching. that's going to
                        > happen. but after you use it a time or two there will be very little
                        > stretching.
                        > most people begin to need some kind of insulation on bottom around 70°f
                        > or so. but like carey said, a pad of some sort may be all it takes.
                        > you may want to take a look at the segmented pad extender (SPE) on
                        > the speer hammock site. it's an inexpensive yet effective way to not only
                        > use your pad to insulate you on the bottom, but also give you insulation
                        > from the cool night air on the sides too.
                        > you probably noticed how you felt the cold when your shoulders, hips,
                        > arms, back side, etc pressed against the hammock. the SPE will separate you
                        > from that. ...tim
                        >
                        > Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
                        > Others with more experience will reply I'm sure, but for me the sag is
                        > cured
                        > by putting the straps WAY up on the tree and not requiring the suspension to
                        > be ties so tight to keep the hammock of the ground. The ridgeline will
                        > control your hang (to a point). If you tie the hammock lines low so you have
                        > to have them straight as a board to hang, you are putting a WHOLE LOT of
                        > force on the lines. By whole lot I mean something like 800 lbs. There a
                        > spreadsheet in the files section that will give you the exact force for
                        > various weights and angles. Also, the first time you use your hammock things
                        > will stretch more than when it's been used a few times. But hanging with the
                        > lines hanging at about 30 degrees works for me.
                        >
                        > As for being chilly, I use my thermarest. I take it along because it's the
                        > "frame" for my G4 backpack, a great sit spot for breaks, and it keeps me
                        > warm at night on the ground or in the hammock. I also use multiple layers of
                        > fleece blanket when it's warm - like maybe 70 degrees? and I still want
                        > something to keep me warm where I press on the hammock. My shoulders
                        > sometimes get cool because they hang off the pad, and i stick my pot cozy
                        > foam under my shoulders (it's 2 pieces). They actually stay there all night.
                        > I don't need to toss in my hammock like I do in my bed.
                        >
                        > Cheers,
                        >
                        > Carey
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
                        >
                        >
                        > ---------------------------------
                        > Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user panel
                        > and lay it on us.
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • Rosaleen Sullivan
                        Hi, Tina- You already have some good advice about improving your hammocking experience. Where are you? If you can hook up with some other hammock lovers, you
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                          Hi, Tina-

                          You already have some good advice about improving your hammocking experience.

                          Where are you? If you can hook up with some other hammock lovers, you can get on the spot field help and advice to solve issues. I'm in MA now, and hope to soon be on the AT south of Erwin, TN, packing maybe as far as Pearisburg, VA. (Well, a friend thinks we can do this. I will be very happy if I make 150 miles.) My current monkey wrench in my summer plans is a family member's hospitalization after being struck by a car. Two plus weeks in Intensive Care. I am not comfortable leaving until her situation is stable. Today was my last day for work at a school, so except for the situation with my DIL's mom, I am free to head out. I am always happy to help with hammock issues along the trail.

                          I suspect you don't quite have the hammock knots down. It took me a long time to get them right. For warmth, I have used a Therm-a-Rest, just not fully inflated, and with other soft pack items (rain gear, jackets, etc.) around the sides for insulation, or a space blanket suspended below, or a fleece poncho suspended below. I am very hung up on items having more than one use, so have not gotten into the underquilts, leaning towards something that will work on the ground, like an inflatable or some sort of foam. The Gossamer Gear Thinlite pad can work as a back pad for a pack such as a Mariposa and then sit on a space blanket or a fleece poncho suspended below and against the hammock bottom for a lot of warmth. My best advice, I think, is to get together with experienced people and learn from them. If by the Internet instead of in person, well, that is better than trial an error alone.

                          Best,

                          Rosaleen






                          First hammock camping experience
                          Posted by: "Tina Paxton" Frecs@...<mailto:Frecs@...> frecs7
                          Date: Thu Jun 14, 2007 3:25 pm ((PDT))

                          Hello,

                          This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
                          Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I discovered
                          several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
                          them out.

                          1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
                          necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the hammock
                          and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as demonstrated
                          on the HH website.

                          2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
                          websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
                          issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the bottom
                          entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
                          Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though, I
                          have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)

                          I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
                          the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Sandy Kramer
                          Since Richard mentioned ultralight in his post, this brings up something I have been wondering about. You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                            Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                            something I have been wondering about.

                            You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's Mosquito
                            Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                            the "accessories" add?

                            I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the bulk and
                            weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                            hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of

                            being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach for
                            stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.

                            I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the gear.

                            sandy in miami





                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@...>
                            wrote:
                            > I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest
                            25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                            PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my disposal are
                            20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                            >
                            > When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I can
                            > remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With that
                            I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the temperature, I
                            > add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the PeaPod for
                            > extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                            > clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                            pullover and pants. >>
                          • Carey Parks
                            Well Sandy, you re in Miami! You won t need all those warmer-uppers they need up north. Except for the odd trip where a cold front comes thru. I take a small
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                              Well Sandy, you're in Miami! You won't need all those warmer-uppers they
                              need up north. Except for the odd trip where a cold front comes thru. I take
                              a small waterproof bag with the odds and ends I might overnight into the
                              hammock with me, and clip it to the loop at the end of the ridge line so it
                              doesn't hit me in the head. It has stuff like cell phone, camers, tissues,
                              snack etc. Maybe a book if I'm hiding from the weather. My water bottle
                              comes in and hangs. The "pack" either hangs from the webbing at the tree or
                              in my kayak, in which case the kayak is the pack, but watch out for racoons.
                              I change clothes either by standing on one side of the hammock where nobody
                              is, or inside the hammock and let my feet hang out. Or sometimes I've use
                              someone else's tent, but boy was I sorry - it was really hot in there. I
                              furl the hammock with snakeskins or with a spare bit of line if I want to
                              sit under the tarp. I just leave my sleeping bag etc. in it and sit on my
                              Thermarest.

                              It is different, and requires different habbits. Or maybe expectations.
                              Those things that you know how to do in a tent now, you will know how to do
                              in a hammock soon. Most of them anyway. Some things just won't work in a
                              hammock. If you take the mindset "I want to do exactly what I do in my tent
                              in my hammock." it ain't gonna happen. Just for the exercise, can you name
                              three things that are better or easier in a hammock than in a tent? It's all
                              about trade offs. Personally, I'll trade rummaging in my pack for a good
                              nights sleep.

                              Carey in Fort Myers

                              PS - C'mon over to the 1000 islands some weekend next winter when we have
                              campouts going. See the SWFLPC yahoo group and/or MangroveNavy yahoo group
                              for camping.



                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                              [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Sandy Kramer
                              Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 5:24 PM
                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] pack sizes and weights



                              Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                              something I have been wondering about.

                              You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's Mosquito
                              Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                              the "accessories" add?

                              I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the bulk and
                              weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                              hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of

                              being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach for
                              stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.

                              I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the gear.

                              sandy in miami

                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@...>
                              wrote:
                              > I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest
                              25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                              PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my disposal are
                              20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                              >
                              > When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I can
                              > remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With that
                              I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the temperature, I
                              > add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the PeaPod for
                              > extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                              > clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                              pullover and pants. >>






                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • tim garner
                              experience will teach you my friend that w/ the right insulation system you can be just as warm & the backpacking hammocker s pack can be just as small & light
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                                experience will teach you my friend that w/ the right insulation system you can be just as warm & the backpacking hammocker's pack can be just as small & light weight as any tarp camper.
                                and the privacy for changing clothes laying in a hammock w/ the tarp covering both sides can be pretty decent. ...tim

                                Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@...> wrote:

                                Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                                something I have been wondering about.

                                You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's Mosquito
                                Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                                the "accessories" add?

                                I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the bulk and
                                weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                                hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of

                                being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach for
                                stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.

                                I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the gear.

                                sandy in miami





                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman
                                wrote:
                                > I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest
                                25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                                PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my disposal are
                                20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                                >
                                > When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I can
                                > remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With that
                                I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the temperature, I
                                > add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the PeaPod for
                                > extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                                > clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                                pullover and pants. >>




                                Yahoo! Groups Links






                                don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


                                ---------------------------------
                                Luggage? GPS? Comic books?
                                Check out fitting gifts for grads at Yahoo! Search.

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Tina Paxton
                                Sorry to hear about your relative, Rosaleen. I live in the extreme southeast corner of NC. ... From: Rosaleen Sullivan To:
                                Message 15 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                                  Sorry to hear about your relative, Rosaleen.

                                  I live in the extreme southeast corner of NC.

                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "Rosaleen Sullivan" <rosaleen43@...>
                                  To: "hammockcamping" <hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 4:47 PM
                                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] First hammock camping experience


                                  > Hi, Tina-
                                  >
                                  > You already have some good advice about improving your hammocking
                                  > experience.
                                  >
                                  > Where are you? If you can hook up with some other hammock lovers, you can
                                  > get on the spot field help and advice to solve issues. I'm in MA now, and
                                  > hope to soon be on the AT south of Erwin, TN, packing maybe as far as
                                  > Pearisburg, VA. (Well, a friend thinks we can do this. I will be very
                                  > happy if I make 150 miles.) My current monkey wrench in my summer plans
                                  > is a family member's hospitalization after being struck by a car. Two
                                  > plus weeks in Intensive Care. I am not comfortable leaving until her
                                  > situation is stable. Today was my last day for work at a school, so
                                  > except for the situation with my DIL's mom, I am free to head out. I am
                                  > always happy to help with hammock issues along the trail.
                                  >
                                  > I suspect you don't quite have the hammock knots down. It took me a long
                                  > time to get them right. For warmth, I have used a Therm-a-Rest, just not
                                  > fully inflated, and with other soft pack items (rain gear, jackets, etc.)
                                  > around the sides for insulation, or a space blanket suspended below, or a
                                  > fleece poncho suspended below. I am very hung up on items having more
                                  > than one use, so have not gotten into the underquilts, leaning towards
                                  > something that will work on the ground, like an inflatable or some sort of
                                  > foam. The Gossamer Gear Thinlite pad can work as a back pad for a pack
                                  > such as a Mariposa and then sit on a space blanket or a fleece poncho
                                  > suspended below and against the hammock bottom for a lot of warmth. My
                                  > best advice, I think, is to get together with experienced people and learn
                                  > from them. If by the Internet instead of in person, well, that is better
                                  > than trial an error alone.
                                  >
                                  > Best,
                                  >
                                  > Rosaleen
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > First hammock camping experience
                                  > Posted by: "Tina Paxton" Frecs@...<mailto:Frecs@...> frecs7
                                  > Date: Thu Jun 14, 2007 3:25 pm ((PDT))
                                  >
                                  > Hello,
                                  >
                                  > This past weekend I had my first opportunity to use my Original Hennessy
                                  > Hammock (a gift from a friend) on a weekend backpacking trip. I
                                  > discovered
                                  > several issues that I need to resolve and perhaps ya'll can help me work
                                  > them out.
                                  >
                                  > 1. Tightening the ridgeline (if I'm using the right word here): I found it
                                  > necessary to retighten the lines 3 times before I could get into the
                                  > hammock
                                  > and not end up on the ground. I used the lashing technique as
                                  > demonstrated
                                  > on the HH website.
                                  >
                                  > 2. Cold. I had issues with my backside getting cold. I've looked at some
                                  > websites regarding underquiltings and other methods of dealing with this
                                  > issue but not sure how to apply many of these ideas to a HH with the
                                  > bottom
                                  > entry. I don't plan on winter camping...mostly late Spring through early
                                  > Fall but still, I'd like to sleep rather than shiver all night. (Though,
                                  > I
                                  > have to say that my hiking partners who all used tents were also cold.)
                                  >
                                  > I am hoping to resolve these issues so I can enjoy my HH on many trips in
                                  > the future. Any suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Richard Perlman
                                  Jeff did an interesting comparison: http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockGroundWeights.html It took me a while to transform into a hammock hanger, loving all the
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                                    Jeff did an interesting comparison:
                                    http://www.tothewoods.net/HammockGroundWeights.html

                                    It took me a while to transform into a hammock hanger, loving
                                    all the benefits you mention of sleeping in a tent, for so many years.
                                    I was all about having my little tent kingdom, with everything spread
                                    all over and easy to find. What I learned was that I really needed
                                    very little of what I had inside the tent. Now, I'm more organized
                                    in my packing and easily have everything I need for the night hung
                                    from the ridge line on mitten hooks or micro 'bieners. Any extra
                                    clothes I may need for the night, are already stuffed with my quilt,
                                    i.e., dry sleep socks, long underwear, wool cap, etc, so I never
                                    forget anything.

                                    I use an 8 x 10 tarp with my hammocks, so I have added a LARGE covered
                                    place to hang out/cook in foul weather.

                                    I went from an 8 lb, 6000 cu in pack to a 29 oz, 3450 cu in. pack and I'm
                                    thinking it still may be too big.

                                    For me, less is better.

                                    Rich

                                    Sandy Kramer wrote:
                                    > Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                                    > something I have been wondering about.
                                    >
                                    > You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's Mosquito
                                    > Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                                    > the "accessories" add?
                                    >
                                    > I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the bulk and
                                    > weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                                    > hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of
                                    >
                                    > being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach for
                                    > stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.
                                    >
                                    > I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the gear.
                                    >
                                    > sandy in miami
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@...>
                                    > wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a Thermarest
                                    >>
                                    > 25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                                    > PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my disposal are
                                    > 20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                                    >
                                    >> When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I can
                                    >> remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With that
                                    >>
                                    > I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the temperature, I
                                    >
                                    >> add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the PeaPod for
                                    >> extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                                    >> clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                                    >>
                                    > pullover and pants. >>
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >


                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Dave Womble
                                    ... Sandy, I think if you compare super-dooper ultralite tenting with super-dooper ultralite hammocking you can come out pretty close. Of course if you
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jun 15, 2007
                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Sandy Kramer" <sandykayak@...>
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                                      > something I have been wondering about.
                                      >
                                      > You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's Mosquito
                                      > Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                                      > the "accessories" add?
                                      >
                                      > I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the bulk and
                                      > weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                                      > hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of
                                      >
                                      > being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach for
                                      > stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.
                                      >
                                      > I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the gear.
                                      >
                                      > sandy in miami
                                      >
                                      >

                                      Sandy,

                                      I think if you compare super-dooper ultralite tenting with
                                      super-dooper ultralite hammocking you can come out pretty close. Of
                                      course if you compare super-dooper ultralite tarping with
                                      lightweight-but-comfort-and-convience-counts hammocking it ain't going
                                      to compare all that well where weight is concerned but that isn't
                                      really a fair comparison either. Most folks don't throw comfort and
                                      survivability 'under the bus' <grin> just to have the lightest
                                      possible weight in tenting, tarping or hammocking... but some folks
                                      do. And top loading hammocks with removable bugnets or very nearly
                                      removable bugnets and full sized tarps are very easy to sit up in,
                                      change clothes in, cook out off, reach stuff in your pack, cook, or
                                      eat and drink out of. More so than a tent with some of those and
                                      maybe a less with others.

                                      Youngblood
                                    • Scott
                                      I ve never had trouble getting out. However, I have trouble closing the velcro with my super shelter attached. ... [Non-text portions of this message have
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jun 17, 2007
                                        I've never had trouble getting out. However, I have trouble closing the
                                        velcro with my super shelter attached.

                                        On 6/15/07, dt king <whipmaker@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>,
                                        > "Tina Paxton" <Frecs@...> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > I discovered
                                        > > several issues that I need to resolve....
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        > I called to order my Hennessy Desert Rat recently; Tom answered the
                                        > phone. After taking my order, he gave me some usage recommendations.
                                        >
                                        > > 1. Tightening the ridgeline
                                        >
                                        > The knots settle the first few times you use the hammock. It'll
                                        > stretch less after a while.
                                        >
                                        > > 2. Cold.
                                        >
                                        > Those silver mylar laminated foam windshield covers as a pad. I got
                                        > some at the dollar store.
                                        >
                                        > He also told me how to get into the hammock, but you probably have
                                        > that down, by now. If you got trees near your house, wouldn't hurt to
                                        > try a few things overnight before you're out in the wilderness.
                                        >
                                        > I'm I the only one who had trouble kicking the velcro apart? For a
                                        > couple of minutes, I was wondering if I'd be trapped in a nylon cocoon
                                        > in the park.
                                        >
                                        > David King
                                        >
                                        > __._
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >


                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • gerzson
                                        I figured in the last few years that my 60l backpack was more than half empty most of the times. One of the past evenings I tried to put all my camping gear in
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Jun 17, 2007
                                          I figured in the last few years that my 60l backpack was more than
                                          half empty most of the times. One of the past evenings I tried to put
                                          all my camping gear in my wifes 25l backpack, and found that it needed
                                          less than half of that. The rest can be used for clothing and food. So
                                          I ordered a light 30l backpack to be used from now on.

                                          Not being an ultralight extremist, my hammock weights 350g, the tarp
                                          450g and the sleeping bag just under 1kg (the one I use 3 seasons).
                                          All this can be compressed in about 4l.
                                          Since I sleep with the hammock through the bag this is all I need for
                                          the night.

                                          gerzson
                                        • Sandy Kramer
                                          Nor would I plan to camp anywhere too cold:) A good night s sleep is definitely what I experienced. Priceless! I was just curious as to how large and heavy
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Jun 18, 2007
                                            Nor would I plan to camp anywhere too cold:) A good night's sleep is
                                            definitely what I experienced. Priceless!

                                            I was just curious as to how large and heavy were the packs of those
                                            with all those heating extras as compared to tent camping.

                                            Keep me posted on outings. I hope to retire in the fall of 08

                                            sandy in miami


                                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...>
                                            wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Well Sandy, you're in Miami! You won't need all those warmer-uppers
                                            they need up north. > > Personally, I'll trade rummaging in my pack
                                            for a good nights sleep.
                                            >
                                            > Carey in Fort Myers
                                            >
                                            > PS - C'mon over to the 1000 islands some weekend next winter when
                                            we have campouts going. See the SWFLPC yahoo group and/or angroveNavy
                                            yahoo group for camping.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > -----Original Message-----
                                            > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                            > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Sandy Kramer
                                            > Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 5:24 PM
                                            > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                            > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] pack sizes and weights
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                                            > something I have been wondering about.
                                            >
                                            > You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's
                                            Mosquito
                                            > Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                                            > the "accessories" add?
                                            >
                                            > I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the
                                            bulk and
                                            > weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                                            > hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of
                                            >
                                            > being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach
                                            for
                                            > stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.
                                            >
                                            > I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the
                                            gear.
                                            >
                                            > sandy in miami
                                            >
                                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@>
                                            > wrote:
                                            > > I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a
                                            Thermarest
                                            > 25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                                            > PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my
                                            disposal are
                                            > 20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                                            > >
                                            > > When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I
                                            can
                                            > > remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With
                                            that
                                            > I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the
                                            temperature, I
                                            > > add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the
                                            PeaPod for
                                            > > extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                                            > > clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                                            > pullover and pants. >>
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            >
                                          • Carey Parks
                                            Hi Sandy, And anyone else who might consider a kayak camping trip to southwest Florida in the winter, you can stay informed of our camping plans by joining the
                                            Message 21 of 24 , Jun 18, 2007
                                              Hi Sandy,

                                              And anyone else who might consider a kayak camping trip to southwest Florida
                                              in the winter, you can stay informed of our camping plans by joining the
                                              MangroveNavy at:

                                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MangroveNavy/

                                              There's not a lot of e-mail traffic because we have other groups for general
                                              kayak related topics. Check out the trip reports and photos. Rest assured
                                              camping in the Everglades or 1000 Islands region isn't as rough as the
                                              survival show Man vs. Wild showed it to be last night. At least not where we
                                              go. I suppose you could try it his way if you want <g>.

                                              Cheers,

                                              Carey

                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                              [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Sandy Kramer
                                              Sent: Monday, June 18, 2007 10:56 AM
                                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] pack sizes and weights



                                              Nor would I plan to camp anywhere too cold:) A good night's sleep is
                                              definitely what I experienced. Priceless!

                                              I was just curious as to how large and heavy were the packs of those
                                              with all those heating extras as compared to tent camping.

                                              Keep me posted on outings. I hope to retire in the fall of 08

                                              sandy in miami

                                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...>
                                              wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Well Sandy, you're in Miami! You won't need all those warmer-uppers
                                              they need up north. > > Personally, I'll trade rummaging in my pack
                                              for a good nights sleep.
                                              >
                                              > Carey in Fort Myers
                                              >
                                              > PS - C'mon over to the 1000 islands some weekend next winter when
                                              we have campouts going. See the SWFLPC yahoo group and/or angroveNavy
                                              yahoo group for camping.
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > -----Original Message-----
                                              > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                              > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Sandy Kramer
                                              > Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 5:24 PM
                                              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                              > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] pack sizes and weights
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > Since Richard mentioned "ultralight" in his post, this brings up
                                              > something I have been wondering about.
                                              >
                                              > You start out, say, with a 1 lb hammock (I have the Byer's
                                              Mosquito
                                              > Traveller)...small and light. How much weight and bulk do all
                                              > the "accessories" add?
                                              >
                                              > I'd love to see pics of filled packs. It seems to me that the
                                              bulk and
                                              > weight must be the same as for a lightweight tent....Of course, a
                                              > hammock is more comfortable but has the drawbacks of
                                              >
                                              > being cooler and not affording a place to change, sit up, reach
                                              for
                                              > stuff in your pack, cook (vestibule style), or eat and drink.
                                              >
                                              > I've only hammock camped twice but had the kayak to carry all the
                                              gear.
                                              >
                                              > sandy in miami
                                              >
                                              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@>
                                              > wrote:
                                              > > I, too, am an underquilt convert (I started out using a
                                              Thermarest
                                              > 25" x > 72" x 2" pad) and I use a modular system. I have a Speer
                                              > PeaPod, Speer > TopBlanket and JRB Shenandoah. Also at my
                                              disposal are
                                              > 20* and 35* down sleeping bags which I use open in quilt style.
                                              > >
                                              > > When it's cold and there are no bugs, I like a Speer because I
                                              can
                                              > > remove the bug netting and get a real outdoors experience. With
                                              that
                                              > I use a PeaPod as the main underquilt. Depending on the
                                              temperature, I
                                              > > add the TopBlanket or JRB Shenandoah, or both, inside the
                                              PeaPod for
                                              > > extra warmth. I also, in ultralight style, incorporate insulated
                                              > > clothing into my sleep system, Bozeman Mountain Works Cocoon
                                              > pullover and pants. >>
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              >






                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Thomas Vickers
                                              The sleeping factor (comfort) is why I prefer a hammock not matter how hot or cold the weather is or how much the system weighs. I have just lowered the weight
                                              Message 22 of 24 , Jun 18, 2007
                                                The sleeping factor (comfort) is why I prefer a hammock not matter how hot
                                                or cold the weather is or how much the system weighs.

                                                I have just lowered the weight of everything else so that I can afford to
                                                carry the sometimes heavier-than-a-tent hammock set up.

                                                There is sleep like hammock sleep on the trail

                                                TV
                                              • Scott
                                                It is all relative. My tarp setup ended up being about the same. My current setup weights are below: HH Backpacker - 1lb 15oz. JRB Next - 20oz.
                                                Message 23 of 24 , Jun 18, 2007
                                                  It is all relative. My tarp setup ended up being about the same.

                                                  My current setup weights are below:

                                                  HH Backpacker - 1lb 15oz.
                                                  JRB Next - 20oz.
                                                  HH Super Shelter - 14oz.

                                                  (or)

                                                  Potomac under-quilt: 24oz.

                                                  Equals about 4lbs with the Super Shelter, and about 4.7lbs with the Potomac
                                                  (I don't have the Potomac yet).

                                                  My previous setup weights are below:

                                                  Mountain Hardware Synthetic Sleeping Bag: 3lbs 8oz.
                                                  Light Year CD Tent: 2lbs 11oz.
                                                  Light Year CD Footprint: 7oz.
                                                  Therm-a-rest pad: 2lbs

                                                  Equals about 8.25lbs

                                                  Before that I had a 6lb tent.

                                                  I don't mind sacrificing a little extra weight for comfort in the sleeping
                                                  area.

                                                  --
                                                  Scott
                                                  www.AntiFuel.com
                                                  www.HikeHaven.com

                                                  Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.

                                                  On 6/18/07, Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > Nor would I plan to camp anywhere too cold:) A good night's sleep is
                                                  > definitely what I experienced. Priceless!
                                                  >
                                                  > I was just curious as to how large and heavy were the packs of those
                                                  > with all those heating extras as compared to tent camping.
                                                  >
                                                  > Keep me posted on outings. I hope to retire in the fall of 08
                                                  >
                                                  > sandy in miami
                                                  >


                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Sandy Kramer
                                                  Thanks, Carey, i just subscribed sandy in miami ... Florida in the winter, you can stay informed of our camping plans by
                                                  Message 24 of 24 , Jun 20, 2007
                                                    Thanks, Carey, i just subscribed
                                                    sandy in miami

                                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Hi Sandy,
                                                    >
                                                    > And anyone else who might consider a kayak camping trip to southwest
                                                    Florida in the winter, you can stay informed of our camping plans by
                                                    joining the MangroveNavy at:
                                                    >
                                                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MangroveNavy/
                                                    >
                                                    >
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