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Silk Hammock Failure!

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  • David Wills
    I had used my first silk hammock for roughly 35 nights in a little over a year before my room mate borrowed and broke it. He was rough with gear by nature, so
    Message 1 of 10 , May 21, 2007
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      I had used my first silk hammock for roughly 35 nights in a little
      over a year before my room mate borrowed and broke it. He was rough
      with gear by nature, so I made another. It was just like the other-
      10mm silk 45" wide, 10ft long whipped at the end with ski rope to hang
      it. about 10 oz total. I had about 15 nights on the new one in 4
      months before it met the same fate. It ripped across the fabric night
      8 of my journey at the foot end whip slowly lowering me to the ground.
      I got up and tied a speer-type knot and re-attached the rope. An hour
      or so later the head end silk ripped in the same spot. I once again
      tied a knot and reattached the rope on that end. This made the hammock
      uncomfortably short, but still better than the ground. 5 minutes or so
      after re-entry, I heard what sounded like ripping silk fibers at my
      head and called it quits with the hammock. The 10mm silk is obviously
      not strong enough to support my 175lb body. I am now going to switch
      to standard 1.9 oz nylon or epic. I cannot recommend anyone else to
      make a reliable hammock out of silk if they expect to save weight over
      nylon. 15 nights is a far cry from the 5 years Ed's red hammock took
      to meet the same humorous fate.

      -Dave from Blairsville
    • Dave Womble
      Dave, Sorry to hear you had that problem but glad you told us about it. Youngblood
      Message 2 of 10 , May 21, 2007
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        Dave,

        Sorry to hear you had that problem but glad you told us about it.

        Youngblood

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
        <little_daddy979@...> wrote:
        >
        > I had used my first silk hammock for roughly 35 nights in a little
        > over a year before my room mate borrowed and broke it. He was rough
        > with gear by nature, so I made another. It was just like the other-
        > 10mm silk 45" wide, 10ft long whipped at the end with ski rope to hang
        > it. about 10 oz total. I had about 15 nights on the new one in 4
        > months before it met the same fate. It ripped across the fabric night
        > 8 of my journey at the foot end whip slowly lowering me to the ground.
        > I got up and tied a speer-type knot and re-attached the rope. An hour
        > or so later the head end silk ripped in the same spot. I once again
        > tied a knot and reattached the rope on that end. This made the hammock
        > uncomfortably short, but still better than the ground. 5 minutes or so
        > after re-entry, I heard what sounded like ripping silk fibers at my
        > head and called it quits with the hammock. The 10mm silk is obviously
        > not strong enough to support my 175lb body. I am now going to switch
        > to standard 1.9 oz nylon or epic. I cannot recommend anyone else to
        > make a reliable hammock out of silk if they expect to save weight over
        > nylon. 15 nights is a far cry from the 5 years Ed's red hammock took
        > to meet the same humorous fate.
        >
        > -Dave from Blairsville
        >
      • Bryce
        Is there varying degrees of quality/types of Silk that could of played a part in your failures perhaps? Just wondering out loud. Thanks for the feednack.
        Message 3 of 10 , May 21, 2007
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          Is there varying degrees of quality/types of Silk that
          could of played a part in your failures perhaps? Just
          wondering out loud. Thanks for the feednack.

          Bryce


          --- David Wills <little_daddy979@...> wrote:

          > I had used my first silk hammock for roughly 35
          > nights in a little
          > over a year before my room mate borrowed and broke
          > it. He was rough
          > with gear by nature, so I made another. It was just
          > like the other-
          > 10mm silk 45" wide, 10ft long whipped at the end
          > with ski rope to hang
          > it. about 10 oz total. I had about 15 nights on the
          > new one in 4
          > months before it met the same fate. It ripped across
          > the fabric night
          > 8 of my journey at the foot end whip slowly lowering
          > me to the ground.
          > I got up and tied a speer-type knot and re-attached
          > the rope. An hour
          > or so later the head end silk ripped in the same
          > spot. I once again
          > tied a knot and reattached the rope on that end.
          > This made the hammock
          > uncomfortably short, but still better than the
          > ground. 5 minutes or so
          > after re-entry, I heard what sounded like ripping
          > silk fibers at my
          > head and called it quits with the hammock. The 10mm
          > silk is obviously
          > not strong enough to support my 175lb body. I am now
          > going to switch
          > to standard 1.9 oz nylon or epic. I cannot recommend
          > anyone else to
          > make a reliable hammock out of silk if they expect
          > to save weight over
          > nylon. 15 nights is a far cry from the 5 years Ed's
          > red hammock took
          > to meet the same humorous fate.
          >
          > -Dave from Blairsville
          >
          >
          >



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        • marta_clark
          Sorry to hear about the problem but I am not surprised that the silk is proving to be somewhat fragile. That has been my experience with silk clothing--when
          Message 4 of 10 , May 21, 2007
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            Sorry to hear about the problem but I am not surprised that the silk is
            proving to be somewhat fragile. That has been my experience with silk
            clothing--when it goes, it goes quickly and completely.

            Last year I was considering wearing a silk shirt during the summer on
            my SOBO. Fortunately I took it on a test hike beforehand. Just a
            couple of hours. When I took my pack off, there were big holes in the
            shirt under the pack straps. The same thing has happened with silk
            long underwear. It's lovely, thin, and light...then one day it springs
            half a dozen runs in the fabric, which turn into big holes.

            Marta/Five-Leaf

            PS--I'm so glad you found your camera, Tim!
          • tim garner
            marta_clark wrote: .Marta/Five-Leaf PS--I m so glad you found your camera, Tim! thanks. me too!!! now the weekend scores a 110%!!!
            Message 5 of 10 , May 21, 2007
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              marta_clark <marta_clark@...> wrote: .Marta/Five-Leaf

              PS--I'm so glad you found your camera, Tim!



              thanks. me too!!! now the weekend scores a 110%!!! only way it would have been better...to have the barefoot hiking girls there<g>. ...tim

              don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


              ---------------------------------
              Got a little couch potato?
              Check out fun summer activities for kids.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Paul Kaercher
              I had the same problem with my 8mm silk hammock. I have since wrapped some scrap silk around the area where the rope/ webbing attaches. This spreads the force
              Message 6 of 10 , May 22, 2007
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                I had the same problem with my 8mm silk hammock.
                I have since wrapped some scrap silk around the area
                where the rope/ webbing attaches. This spreads the
                force from the rope/webbing over a greater area, and
                I have not had second failure. (so far)
                I weigh 176 and have since made a hammock from
                10mm silk. The padding technique was used on this hammock
                as well and so far have about 15 nights in it.

                Paul
              • Cara Lin Bridgman
                Silk is weak when wet and strongest when dry (that scene in Shanghai Noon is factually incorrect, but makes a entertaining sequence). So, silk makes much
                Message 7 of 10 , May 24, 2007
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                  Silk is weak when wet and strongest when dry (that scene in Shanghai
                  Noon is factually incorrect, but makes a entertaining sequence). So,
                  silk makes much better camp wear than hiking wear. My hiking silk
                  turtleneck always dissolved in the armpits. Now, I stick to wool and
                  poly for daytime wear.

                  CL

                  marta_clark wrote:
                  > Sorry to hear about the problem but I am not surprised that the silk is
                  > proving to be somewhat fragile. That has been my experience with silk
                  > clothing--when it goes, it goes quickly and completely.
                  >
                  > Last year I was considering wearing a silk shirt during the summer on
                  > my SOBO. Fortunately I took it on a test hike beforehand. Just a
                  > couple of hours. When I took my pack off, there were big holes in the
                  > shirt under the pack straps. The same thing has happened with silk
                  > long underwear. It's lovely, thin, and light...then one day it springs
                  > half a dozen runs in the fabric, which turn into big holes.
                  >
                  > Marta/Five-Leaf
                  >
                  > PS--I'm so glad you found your camera, Tim!
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --

                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  Cara Lin Bridgman

                  P.O. Box 013 Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
                  Longjing Sinjhuang
                  Taichung County 434
                  Taiwan http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin/
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                • John and Jessica
                  I ve had the same luck with silk, or lack thereof. I have one silk shirt that I will rock occassionally, but that s about it as far as backpacking gear goes.
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 24, 2007
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                    I've had the same luck with silk, or lack thereof. I have one silk shirt
                    that I will rock occassionally, but that's about it as far as backpacking
                    gear goes.

                    By the way, not surprisingly, I've had more than a few hammockers take my AT
                    Thru-hiker Survey thus far. I can't wait to see all the changes in gear that
                    come out of this study.

                    Here's the thru-hiker study link. Pass it around to anyone that's attempted
                    or completed a thru-hike.

                    http://sourcetosea.net/thruhiker/study.html

                    --
                    Visit www.SourcetoSea.net for more information about our 2,150 mile
                    expedition down the Mississippi River to benefit the Audubon Society.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • C C Wayah
                    I have to wonder how old the silk was when bought. It could have been in a wear house for awhile or if it was exposed to the sun. I wear silk on the trial as
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 25, 2007
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                      I have to wonder how old the silk was when bought.
                      It could have been in a wear house for awhile
                      or if it was exposed to the sun.

                      I wear silk on the trial as PJ type sleeping bag liner's and
                      silk tops when I can get them cheap from thrift shops.
                      I just repalce them when needed from my supply of used items on short trips
                      and would use a bounce bos when hike longer distances but never have just
                      one shirt with me. Silk hand washes out eaily and dries even faster.

                      Rogene
                    • David Wills
                      It is a possibility. But that still shouldn t be a big enough issue to warrant such a quick failure. Silk, IMO, is still great for bag liners and PJs because
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 26, 2007
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                        It is a possibility. But that still shouldn't be a big enough issue
                        to warrant such a quick failure. Silk, IMO, is still great for bag
                        liners and PJs because it feels really good. It just isn't an
                        adequate fabric for any heavy use applications such as hiking shirts
                        and hammocks. I also wouldn't recommend the 4.5mm silk for sleeping
                        bag apps. I have used my quilt lined with it for nearly 50 nights and
                        it has 3 or 4 small tears in it where the momentum shell is still in
                        like new condition. It has held up reasonably well and I will
                        continue to use it until it reaches dilapidation, and then a little
                        more, but the weight penalty of nylon is very small compared to the
                        durability and performance advantages.

                        There are different grades of silk. Sea to Summit has discount liners
                        made from grade 'B' silk if i remember correctly. Thai Silks, where I
                        purchased mine, made no claims to grade.

                        -Dave

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "C C Wayah" <ccwayah@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I have to wonder how old the silk was when bought.
                        > It could have been in a wear house for awhile
                        > or if it was exposed to the sun.
                        >
                        > I wear silk on the trial as PJ type sleeping bag liner's and
                        > silk tops when I can get them cheap from thrift shops.
                        > I just repalce them when needed from my supply of used items on
                        short trips
                        > and would use a bounce bos when hike longer distances but never have
                        just
                        > one shirt with me. Silk hand washes out eaily and dries even faster.
                        >
                        > Rogene
                        >
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