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A few ideas...

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  • tcoug7
    I ve been using my rain poncho beneath my Hennessy to create a place for my insulation. I m still needing something, as spring still is keeping the nights as
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 12, 2003
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      I've been using my rain poncho beneath my Hennessy to create a place
      for my insulation. I'm still needing something, as spring still is
      keeping the nights as low as 40F. I've been real happy so far with
      relectix. I cut it into three equal strips. Then I taped them back
      together(duct tape holds up better than the foil tape). The nice
      thing with this is I can fold the relectix like a zrest and then coil
      it up. I end up with a narrow role. Right now I only need one
      layer. When the temps start to drop later on, I'll be interested in
      seeing how well doubling up layers of reflectix work - I could offset
      the seams, reducing cold spots. My complaint with the taco approach
      is the way my under layer causes the hammock to hug me even more.
      It's really not a big deal, but I love the way it feels when the
      sides are pulled out. So, what I've been thinking of is something
      else to use on the bottom that won't alter the natural shape of the
      hammock. As far as putting the stuff outside - I love it. No
      problems turning at night and ending up with cold spots. Flyfisher's
      work with the dble bottom should solve this problem I'm experiencing,
      but an 'after-market' mod would be nice. I'm thinking of maybe some
      type of elastic webbing? Something that I could cut to follow the
      contour of the hammock bottom, yet give a little for the insulating
      layer, but still be able to stake the sides out! I could attach it to
      the hammock - maybe hook-n-loop fastners. I don't feel the bottom
      needs to be silnylon, or anything water-proof for that matter. Any
      thoughts?

      Tim
    • Ray Garlington
      Some comments below. ... Not using the side pulls on a HH makes you feel like you are giving up something. Solving this problem would require putting a slot
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 13, 2003
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        Some comments below.

        > My complaint with the taco approach
        > is the way my under layer causes the hammock to hug me even more.
        > It's really not a big deal, but I love the way it feels when the
        > sides are pulled out.

        Not using the side pulls on a HH makes you feel like you are giving up
        something. Solving this problem would require putting a slot of some
        sort through the shell to allow the side pulls to go through. At that
        point you loose the ability to use a simple tarp. On the other hand,
        with the Speer hammock, you loose nothing with the taco.

        > So, what I've been thinking of is something
        > else to use on the bottom that won't alter the natural shape of the
        > hammock. As far as putting the stuff outside - I love it. No
        > problems turning at night and ending up with cold spots.

        I think if you followed Tom Hennessey's template for modifying a space
        blanket to sling underneath, but used better material (ripstop nylon)
        you would have what you are looking for.

        I don't feel the bottom needs to be silnylon, or anything water-proof
        for that matter. Any thoughts?

        I have used the older HH expedition 2.5 hammock with the small fly in
        severe thunderstorms. If you don't have it pitched exactly right,
        you'll get wet. Plus with strong winds, rain will hit the bottom
        directly and rain will seep in. The syl nylon stops this and provides
        an extra measure of storm protection. It isn't necessary for normal
        circumstances.
      • dawnhark
        Hi Tim--another familiar face! More questions for all you experts here!! TIA, BTW, for all your help--I started reading the list from about a month
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 19, 2003
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          Hi Tim--another familiar face!

          More questions for all you experts here!! TIA, BTW, for all your
          help--I started reading the list from about a month back--should
          really read from the start...lotta good info...

          Is reflectix the same thing as a windshield reflector?

          Do you think I could add a layer of 1.1 nylon to the bottom of my Byer
          Traveller?

          I LOVE the idea of putting the insulation below the hammock instead of
          IN it--easier to turn over, less shifting, less squishable too...Do I
          just add the bottom layer of fabric flat, or do I have to do a "box"
          thing? I'm looking at freezing temps spring and fall, to 40-50F for
          summer...

          Dawn
        • alidisaster
          I like this insulation below thing as well. Teemed with a quilt - hmm, comfy sounding. Like a bed at home. Pennineoutdoor in the UK sells 240gm/m2
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 20, 2003
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            I like this 'insulation below' thing as well. Teemed with a quilt -
            hmm, comfy sounding. Like a bed at home.

            Pennineoutdoor in the UK sells 240gm/m2 hollowfill with pertex on one
            side for 6.60 per mtr - and it is 150cm wide. So for about 11 usd, I
            can get a piece 5ft by 3ft - that would nicely insulate the middle
            section of my hammock - I could just stitch it directly to the bottom.

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dawnhark" <dawnhark@y...>
            wrote:
            > Hi Tim--another familiar face!
            >
            > More questions for all you experts here!! TIA, BTW, for all your
            > help--I started reading the list from about a month back--should
            > really read from the start...lotta good info...
            >
            > Is reflectix the same thing as a windshield reflector?
            >
            > Do you think I could add a layer of 1.1 nylon to the bottom of my
            Byer
            > Traveller?
            >
            > I LOVE the idea of putting the insulation below the hammock instead
            of
            > IN it--easier to turn over, less shifting, less squishable too...Do
            I
            > just add the bottom layer of fabric flat, or do I have to do a "box"
            > thing? I'm looking at freezing temps spring and fall, to 40-50F for
            > summer...
            >
            > Dawn
          • tcoug7
            ... Hi Dawn! Welcome! Yeah, you ve found the place where all us tree- swingers hang out. ;) ... Well, from the stuff I ve seen - yes and no. Reflectix is
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 20, 2003
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dawnhark" <dawnhark@y...>
              wrote:
              > Hi Tim--another familiar face!
              >

              Hi Dawn! Welcome! Yeah, you've found the place where all us tree-
              swingers hang out. ;)


              > More questions for all you experts here!! TIA, BTW, for all your
              > help--I started reading the list from about a month back--should
              > really read from the start...lotta good info...
              >
              > Is reflectix the same thing as a windshield reflector?

              Well, from the stuff I've seen - yes and no. Reflectix is bubble
              wrap sandwiched between foil. It is used to insulate hot water
              tanks, heating ducts, etc. It comes in various width roles and can
              be had a building supply centers, like Home Depot. The wind shield
              reflectors are thinner and more rigid (at least the ones I've
              encountered). It seems the bubble wrap in the windshield reflectors
              is smaller. I've seen some with a foam core.

              >
              > Do you think I could add a layer of 1.1 nylon to the bottom of my
              Byer
              > Traveller?

              Sure. Many are using the stuff, and like Ray Garlington pointed out,
              it adds waterproof protection. For me, the worst is wind and rain.
              You know, the stuff that is falling horizontally! You really need to
              get your rain fly pitched low to stay dry. I actually like the misty
              feeling. It's the dripping feeling I can do without. I'm doing some
              stuff now with Tyvec. We'll see.


              >
              > I LOVE the idea of putting the insulation below the hammock instead
              of
              > IN it--easier to turn over, less shifting, less squishable too...Do
              I
              > just add the bottom layer of fabric flat, or do I have to do a "box"
              > thing? I'm looking at freezing temps spring and fall, to 40-50F for
              > summer...

              You want your insulation to extend up the sides a little bit to
              eliminate any cold spots - especially around your shoulders. That's
              why a wider pad is called for than on the ground. I want my
              insulation completely covered for a few reasons: to hold it firmly in
              place, to hold it close to me (eliminates any small circulating air
              currents that rob you of your heat), and to eliminate the possibility
              of creating a channel for water to run down.

              Does that help?

              Tim
            • tcoug7
              ... one ... I ... bottom. I am having trouble finding this stuff on their website, can you post the complete URL? Thanks...Tim
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 20, 2003
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                > Pennineoutdoor in the UK sells 240gm/m2 hollowfill with pertex on
                one
                > side for 6.60 per mtr - and it is 150cm wide. So for about 11 usd,
                I
                > can get a piece 5ft by 3ft - that would nicely insulate the middle
                > section of my hammock - I could just stitch it directly to the
                bottom.

                I am having trouble finding this stuff on their website, can you post
                the complete URL?

                Thanks...Tim
              • Gregg Spoering
                OK Tim, cough it up!....... ;-) Gregg From: tcoug7
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 21, 2003
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                  OK Tim, cough it up!.......
                  ;-)
                  Gregg

                  From: "tcoug7" <tcoug7@...>

                  >Snip
                  > It's the dripping feeling I can do without. I'm doing some
                  >stuff now with Tyvec. We'll see.

                  >Tim
                • dawnhark
                  ... wn. ... Yes it does--thanks Tim! Dawn
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 21, 2003
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "tcoug7" <tcoug7@a...> wrote:
                    wn.
                    >
                    > Does that help?
                    >
                    > Tim

                    Yes it does--thanks Tim!

                    Dawn
                  • dawnhark
                    Okay. I ve been reading about the Garlington approach and the taco (same thing??) and the double-bottom. 1. Would it be a problem if I were to hand-sew (more
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jun 21, 2003
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                      Okay. I've been reading about the Garlington approach and the taco
                      (same thing??) and the double-bottom.

                      1. Would it be a problem if I were to hand-sew (more likley, tack it
                      on every few inches or so along three edges, or even use patches of
                      velcro) a layer of 1.1 breathable nylon to the bottom of my Byer
                      Traveller?

                      If I do that, should the piece of fabric be the same length and width
                      as the hammock? (I would leave one end open for insertion of
                      pad/windshield reflector/whatever.)

                      2. Would it be better for some reason to do the thing Hennessey does
                      with pleating and tying the fabric on underneath, and if so, why?

                      I want to get started on this, but I still don't know exactly what I'm
                      doing...

                      Your thoughts?

                      Dawn
                    • snows3626
                      I ve sewn layers on the bottoms of three HH style hammocks, and learned a few things in the process. First, hammocks stretch a lot due to the weight of your
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jun 22, 2003
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                        I've sewn layers on the bottoms of three HH style hammocks, and
                        learned a few things in the process. First, hammocks stretch a lot
                        due to the weight of your body. The thread and the bottom layer
                        will resist the stretch of the hammock, possibly breaking the thread
                        in several locations, and possibly causing a tear in either the
                        hammock or the bottom layer.

                        Second, the shape of the bottom of the hammock is not conducive to
                        leaving an entire long edge of the bottom layer open, especially if
                        you lay on the diagonal. If you leave too much of an edge unsewn,
                        the bottom layer won't hug the hammock when you get in.

                        Here's what I did to overcome these problems, and it's working
                        fairly well. Cut the bottom layer to match the pad you're going to
                        use. Cut the fabric such that when sewn to the hammock, the bias
                        (threads) are running in the same direction. That way the hammock
                        and bottom layer will tend to stretch in the same directions. Hem
                        the edges. Next, have someone lay in the hammock while you pin (be
                        careful) the bottom layer to the hammock. The hammock will be
                        pleated on the ends and you want the bottom layer to be fairly
                        flat. Carefully extract the person out of the hammock so you don't
                        pull the pins loose. As you sew the two pieces together, stretch
                        the hammock a lot so that the thread will have some stretch to it
                        when you finish. Lastly, on a HH leave about 1/2 of the side that
                        covers the slit open. This will allow you to enter the slit without
                        the bottom layer getting in the way, and it provides an opening to
                        insert the pad. On other style hammocks, you can sew two long edges
                        and one short edge, leaving one short edge open (much more simple
                        than with the HH).

                        I haven't had a problem with the needle holes trying to open up or
                        tear. Even though this design has proven itself, I'm still not
                        completely satisfied with the results. Based on what I've learned
                        so far, I'm going to construct a double-bottom HH style hammock out
                        of 1.1 sil-nyl this week. I'll offset the slit to the side such
                        that it doesn't interfere with the pad. I haven't decided yet
                        whether I'll sew a box for the pad. Depends on whether the pad will
                        stay where I put it.

                        Good luck with what ever you do.

                        Daniel

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dawnhark" <dawnhark@y...>
                        wrote:
                        > Okay. I've been reading about the Garlington approach and the taco
                        > (same thing??) and the double-bottom.
                        >
                        > 1. Would it be a problem if I were to hand-sew (more likley, tack
                        it
                        > on every few inches or so along three edges, or even use patches of
                        > velcro) a layer of 1.1 breathable nylon to the bottom of my Byer
                        > Traveller?
                        >
                        > If I do that, should the piece of fabric be the same length and
                        width
                        > as the hammock? (I would leave one end open for insertion of
                        > pad/windshield reflector/whatever.)
                        >
                        > 2. Would it be better for some reason to do the thing Hennessey
                        does
                        > with pleating and tying the fabric on underneath, and if so, why?
                        >
                        > I want to get started on this, but I still don't know exactly what
                        I'm
                        > doing...
                        >
                        > Your thoughts?
                        >
                        > Dawn
                      • Shane Steinkamp
                        ... Well, if your sewing machine makes zig stitches, you can stitch the fabric with the zigs. The zigs will act like hinges instead of straight lines. They ll
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jun 22, 2003
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                          > First, hammocks stretch a lot due to the weight of your
                          > body. The thread and the bottom layer will resist the
                          > stretch of the hammock, possibly breaking the thread
                          > in several locations, and possibly causing a tear in
                          > either the hammock or the bottom layer.

                          Well, if your sewing machine makes zig stitches, you can stitch the fabric
                          with the zigs. The zigs will act like hinges instead of straight lines.
                          They'll actually be stronger and more efficient for this kind of thing.

                          Shane
                        • alidisaster
                          go to http://www.pennineoutdoor.co.uk/, then look in the materials price list - it is item code P19. It is in the materials description under pre-quilted
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 23, 2003
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                            go to http://www.pennineoutdoor.co.uk/, then look in the materials
                            price list - it is item code P19. It is in the materials description
                            under pre-quilted fabrics.

                            >
                            > I am having trouble finding this stuff on their website, can you
                            post
                            > the complete URL?
                            >
                            > Thanks...Tim
                          • snows3626
                            Great idea Shane. I initially was concerned with punching a lot of holes in the hammock, but the zig-zag stitch probably doesn t punch any more holes than a
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jun 23, 2003
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                              Great idea Shane. I initially was concerned with punching a lot of
                              holes in the hammock, but the zig-zag stitch probably doesn't punch
                              any more holes than a straight stitch, and every other hole is offset
                              so that you don't have as many holes in a single line. I like that a
                              lot better.

                              Daniel

                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp" <shane@t...>
                              wrote:
                              > > First, hammocks stretch a lot due to the weight of your
                              > > body. The thread and the bottom layer will resist the
                              > > stretch of the hammock, possibly breaking the thread
                              > > in several locations, and possibly causing a tear in
                              > > either the hammock or the bottom layer.
                              >
                              > Well, if your sewing machine makes zig stitches, you can stitch the
                              fabric
                              > with the zigs. The zigs will act like hinges instead of straight
                              lines.
                              > They'll actually be stronger and more efficient for this kind of
                              thing.
                              >
                              > Shane
                            • tcoug7
                              ... description ... Got it. Thanks. Tim
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jun 23, 2003
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                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "alidisaster"
                                <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
                                > go to http://www.pennineoutdoor.co.uk/, then look in the materials
                                > price list - it is item code P19. It is in the materials
                                description
                                > under pre-quilted fabrics.
                                >

                                Got it. Thanks.

                                Tim
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