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[Hammock Camping] Re: Studies

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  • mrbyer
    If the law states you cannot tie to a tree and the Palm is a grass not a tree does that mean you can tie to a palm? ;) ... tying or ... problem with ... from
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 3, 2007
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      If the law states you cannot tie to a tree and the Palm is a grass not
      a tree does that mean you can tie to a palm? ;)


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...> wrote:
      >
      > Here in Florida and I believe at least one other state prohibits
      tying or
      > nailing anything to their trees. The US Forrest Service has no
      problem with
      > it in Florida. I feel that the ban on tying anything to trees came
      from the
      > use of thin line for clothes lines and tarp hanging. A tarp in the wind
      > makes a good motor for a line saw. Florida State Parks get a lot of use.
      > This ban on tying anything to the trees is the ONLY rule pointed out
      to me
      > out of about ten when we registered for campsite. They are serious
      about it.
      >
      > I have heard that rangers are impressed when you take the time to
      show them
      > how the wide webbing spreads the load and minimizes impact to the
      tree. But
      > rules are rules and you still have to pitch that hammock like a tarp
      tent.
      >
      > By the way, a palm is a grass and not a tree. Maybe that's related.
      >
      > Also, when the test site is a park site, you are sleeping on sand
      anyway, so
      > nothing is harmed beyond the original development. The trees on the
      other
      > hand are needed to shade that sand.
      >
      > In a back country situation the hammock might win the impact
      contest, but
      > that's if you don't spread a ground cloth under it, and live on that
      like it
      > were a tent.
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of hacktorious
      > Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 2:03 PM
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Studies
      >
      >
      > I am not aware of an studies for hammocks, but I brought this topic up
      > during a hike leadership training course I attended last year. The
      > only thing the instructor could say was that in his opinion it was far
      > less damaging than using a tent. However, some parks do not allow
      > hammocks.
      >
      > Extensive studies have gone into tents and trails. I forgot the exact
      > details, but a typical tent spot, which is used many times in one
      > season can take 10-15 years to recover to it's original state.
      >
      > In my personal opinion, I agree with the instructor.
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, amendment2@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Does anyone know of any studies done on tree damage from hammock
      > camping?
      > > Short or long term?
      > > Thanks
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ************************************** See what's free at
      > http://www.aol.com
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Carey Parks
      Very good question! ... From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of mrbyer Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 6:47 PM
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 3, 2007
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        Very good question!

        ----Original Message-----
        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of mrbyer
        Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 6:47 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Studies


        If the law states you cannot tie to a tree and the Palm is a grass not
        a tree does that mean you can tie to a palm? ;)

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here in Florida and I believe at least one other state prohibits
        tying or
        > nailing anything to their trees. The US Forrest Service has no
        problem with
        > it in Florida. I feel that the ban on tying anything to trees came
        from the
        > use of thin line for clothes lines and tarp hanging. A tarp in the wind
        > makes a good motor for a line saw. Florida State Parks get a lot of use.
        > This ban on tying anything to the trees is the ONLY rule pointed out
        to me
        > out of about ten when we registered for campsite. They are serious
        about it.
        >
        > I have heard that rangers are impressed when you take the time to
        show them
        > how the wide webbing spreads the load and minimizes impact to the
        tree. But
        > rules are rules and you still have to pitch that hammock like a tarp
        tent.
        >
        > By the way, a palm is a grass and not a tree. Maybe that's related.
        >
        > Also, when the test site is a park site, you are sleeping on sand
        anyway, so
        > nothing is harmed beyond the original development. The trees on the
        other
        > hand are needed to shade that sand.
        >
        > In a back country situation the hammock might win the impact
        contest, but
        > that's if you don't spread a ground cloth under it, and live on that
        like it
        > were a tent.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of hacktorious
        > Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 2:03 PM
        > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Studies
        >
        >
        > I am not aware of an studies for hammocks, but I brought this topic up
        > during a hike leadership training course I attended last year. The
        > only thing the instructor could say was that in his opinion it was far
        > less damaging than using a tent. However, some parks do not allow
        > hammocks.
        >
        > Extensive studies have gone into tents and trails. I forgot the exact
        > details, but a typical tent spot, which is used many times in one
        > season can take 10-15 years to recover to it's original state.
        >
        > In my personal opinion, I agree with the instructor.
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, amendment2@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Does anyone know of any studies done on tree damage from hammock
        > camping?
        > > Short or long term?
        > > Thanks
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ************************************** See what's free at
        > http://www.aol.com
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Scott
        Bring the botany book to court with you..........lol ... -- Scott www.AntiFuel.com Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open. [Non-text
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 3, 2007
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          Bring the botany book to court with you..........lol

          On 4/3/07, Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
          >
          > Very good question!
          >


          --
          Scott
          www.AntiFuel.com

          Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Cara Lin Bridgman
          ... camping? ... Nope, I m monitoring the effects of one night s camping on Cryptomeria sp. The tree-huggers compacted the bark, which tends to be spongy,
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 4, 2007
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            amendment2@... wrote:
            > Does anyone know of any studies done on tree damage from hammock
            camping?
            > Short or long term?


            Nope, I'm monitoring the effects of one night's camping on Cryptomeria
            sp. The tree-huggers compacted the bark, which tends to be spongy,
            especially in the rain which was when I camped there. Half a year
            later, it is still easy to see where the tree-huggers had gripped the
            tree. Whether this damaged the tree, I don't know. I doubt most people
            would notice the effect. Probably the biggest effect was scraping moss
            off the tree, leaving a lighter-colored ring.

            Every time I return to the site, I snap a fresh set of pictures.

            So, the type of tree probably does matter. I doubt shag-bark hickories
            are good hammock trees...

            CL
          • John and Jessica
            I ll poke through some of my stuff back at the office. We re (ladyfriend and I) are working on PhD s in Parks and Rec. She deal more with recreation ecology
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 4, 2007
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              I'll poke through some of my stuff back at the office. We're (ladyfriend and
              I) are working on PhD's in Parks and Rec. She deal more with recreation
              ecology than I do though. I deal more with trail systems, greenways, and
              that sort of stuff.

              There is scads of info about tent and campsite impacts, but I don't remember
              anything specifically about hammocks.

              -John
              www.SourcetoSea.net

              --
              Visit www.SourcetoSea.net for more information about our 2,150 mile
              expedition down the Mississippi River to benefit the Audubon Society.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • amendment2@aol.com
              Can you tell me the recovery time from frequently used tent campsites? Please cite studies, not anecdotal evidence. Thanks, Dave Fox In a message dated
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 4, 2007
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                Can you tell me the recovery time from frequently used tent campsites?
                Please cite studies, not anecdotal evidence.
                Thanks,
                Dave Fox


                In a message dated 4/4/2007 2:38:15 PM Central Daylight Time,
                source2sea@... writes:

                I'll poke through some of my stuff back at the office. We're (ladyfriend and
                I) are working on PhD's in Parks and Rec. She deal more with recreation
                ecology than I do though. I deal more with trail systems, greenways, and
                that sort of stuff.

                There is scads of info about tent and campsite impacts, but I don't remember
                anything specifically about hammocks.

                -John
                www.SourcetoSea.www






                ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cara Lin Bridgman
                ... Won t recovery time depend on use (amount and type), habitat, substrate, and climate? I d expect recover times in the GSMNP to be different from those in
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 4, 2007
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                  amendment2@... wrote:
                  > Can you tell me the recovery time from frequently used tent campsites?
                  > Please cite studies, not anecdotal evidence.


                  Won't recovery time depend on use (amount and type), habitat, substrate,
                  and climate?

                  I'd expect recover times in the GSMNP to be different from those in
                  Grand Canyon NP.
                • Scott
                  The leadership course I took, which I previously mentioned, was taught by Leave No Trace . Here are some articles I dug up from
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 4, 2007
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                    The leadership course I took, which I previously mentioned, was taught by Leave
                    No Trace <http://www.lnt.org/main.html>.

                    Here are some articles I dug up from their website, which may contain the
                    info your looking for.

                    Recreation Impacts and Management in Wilderness: A State-of-Knowledge
                    Review<http://www.lnt.org/training/resources/documents/SOKWildernesspap.pdf>
                    Recreation Ecology Research Findings - Implications for Wilderness and Park
                    Managers<http://www.lnt.org/training/resources/documents/RecEcolResFindings.pdf>

                    The link to more of their resources is:
                    http://www.lnt.org/training/resources/index.html

                    If you cannot what your looking for you can browse their main website by
                    visiting: http://www.lnt.org

                    I am sure you can find something there. You can also email them and ask any
                    further questions you might have. They are more then willing to help.
                    Good Luck!

                    PS:
                    I am digging through my paperwork from the course in hopes I might find
                    something for you.

                    --
                    Scott
                    www.AntiFuel.com

                    Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.

                    On 4/4/07, amendment2@... <amendment2@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Can you tell me the recovery time from frequently used tent campsites?
                    > Please cite studies, not anecdotal evidence.
                    > Thanks,
                    > Dave Fox
                    >
                    > In a message dated 4/4/2007 2:38:15 PM Central Daylight Time,
                    > source2sea@... <source2sea%40gmail.com> writes:
                    >
                    > I'll poke through some of my stuff back at the office. We're (ladyfriend
                    > and
                    > I) are working on PhD's in Parks and Rec. She deal more with recreation
                    > ecology than I do though. I deal more with trail systems, greenways, and
                    > that sort of stuff.
                    >
                    > There is scads of info about tent and campsite impacts, but I don't
                    > remember
                    > anything specifically about hammocks.
                    >
                    > -John
                    > www.SourcetoSea.www
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • amendment2@aol.com
                    Thanks, I already have found in the studies you cited, that tent camping recovery depending on the resiliancy of the site can take from 3 to 30 years. More
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 5, 2007
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                      Thanks, I already have found in the studies you cited, that tent camping
                      recovery depending on the resiliancy of the site can take from 3 to 30 years.
                      More importantly, in the report bibliographies, I have more names of people to
                      contact for current information.



                      ************************************** See what's free at http://www.aol.com


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