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Blue pad blues, still

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  • chcoa
    The last few times I ve been out in my hammock it was cold enough that I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don t generally do this because
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 15, 2007
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      The last few times I've been out in my hammock it was cold enough that
      I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
      generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
      without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
      had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
      with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
      cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
      clothes.

      I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
      but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
      functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.

      Thanks
      Jamie in AZ
    • tim garner
      i made a insulated hammock last year that i m still using. i used insulation i got from ed speer (don t remember what it was called) but you could use quilt
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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        i made a insulated hammock last year that i'm still using.
        i used insulation i got from ed speer (don't remember what it was called) but you could use quilt batting from wal-mart.


        chcoa <jdeben@...> wrote: The last few times I've been out in my hammock it was cold enough that
        I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
        generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
        without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
        had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
        with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
        cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
        clothes.

        I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
        but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
        functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.

        Thanks
        Jamie in AZ





        Yahoo! Groups Links






        don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


        ---------------------------------
        Bored stiff? Loosen up...
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      • Dave Womble
        ... Jamie, When I use a CCF pad I have some nylon material between the pad and me, either in a two-layer hammock or with a SPE or some other similar
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@...> wrote:
          >
          > The last few times I've been out in my hammock it was cold enough that
          > I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
          > generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
          > without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
          > had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
          > with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
          > cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
          > clothes.
          >
          > I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
          > but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
          > functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.
          >
          > Thanks
          > Jamie in AZ
          >

          Jamie,

          When I use a CCF pad I have some nylon material between the pad and
          me, either in a two-layer hammock or with a SPE or some other similar
          arrangement. That has tamed the insensible perspiration issue for me
          as the small amount of moisture mostly wicks away on the nylon
          material and evaporates into the air. Now if I am overheating and
          sweating, that raises the problem and I have more moisture to deal
          with... I adjust my insulation to cool off and try to avoid
          overheating. When I use thick CCF pads in cooler weather I use the
          RidgeRest on top for comfort and I suspect the ridges in it might help
          some with perspiration issues as moisture sometimes accumulates in the
          ridges. Other times when I use a SPE I will put my fleece jacket
          inside the main compartment of the SPE to get more insulation and even
          more effective wicking action.

          When I have used CCF pads, I have always had the breathable hammock
          fabric along the edges of the pads without anything else to impede the
          flow of air and usually had no bugnet over my hammock. I noticed from
          your prior post that you sometimes use the SuperShelter and I was
          under the impression that was made of a non-breathable material, ie
          silnylon. You need fresh air movement to some degree to carry away
          moisture. I know everyone realizes that moisture will just continue
          to accumulate if you are generating moisture faster than it can wick
          away and evaporate, but sometimes it helps to recall that so you can
          think of possible solutions for your situation.

          In general, non-breathable is best in cooler and windy conditions
          while breathable is best in warmer and static conditions. We can
          either adjust the breathability of our insulation or live with what we
          chose when the conditions are not optimum for what we chose. You can
          have insulation that you swear by in the right conditions, swear at in
          the wrong conditions and it works okay in most conditions... and that
          is not all that uncommon. The Hennessy Hammocks have sewn-in
          bugnetting that actually impedes the flow of fresh air that is needed
          to help control perspiration issues... bugnetting affects
          breathability. When there is some air movement due to wind, a bugnet
          might be just the ticket as it limits the air movement and keeps
          everything comfortable. However, when there is no wind and it is
          humid, a bugnet in a small space like a hammock can make it feel as
          humid as a sauna. I suspect the SuperShelter is the same in regards
          to wind, humidity and mositure buildup due to perspiration.

          A few years ago I made a hammock tarptent to use in winter
          conditions. In the right conditions it works great but in the wrong
          conditions it doesn't. Even when it stays cold, it works great when
          there is wind and it builds up humidity when the wind stops... you can
          see the humid air you exhale either gracefully exit the ends of the
          tarp or go up and not make it all the way to the end of the tarp
          before it condenses on the tarp. I can get out of my warm bed and
          adjust it for whatever the wind is doing, but the wind often comes and
          goes during the night... for some reason it just doesn't always
          cooperate with me <grin>. I very seldom feel like getting up and
          making adjustments when it is cold and I am warm, so I just make my
          best guess as to how I want to set it up before I turn in for the
          night and try to make the best of it. Besides, I always figure that
          if I get up and adjust it because the wind stopped, then the wind will
          pick back up about the time I get back in my hammock and rewarm myself.

          Dave
          aka Youngblood
        • Nate
          Jamie, I have done a few things to reduce the likely hood I will need to add a pad. First, I purchased a backpacker poncho from campmor. This is the long
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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            Jamie,
            I have done a few things to reduce the likely hood I will need to add
            a pad.

            First, I purchased a backpacker poncho from campmor. This is the long
            version. It has loops on the corners. I suspend this under my
            hammock. I placed draw cords in the short ends to snug it up against
            the hammock. The long ends are unmodified. No sewing was required.
            The poncho was about $15 plus shipping and it is now my rain gear for
            when I want to go light weight or when I hammock.

            Second, I had my slumberjack mummy bag modified at a local seamstress.
            I had them add in a foot zipper. This allows me to pass the hammock
            ropes through the bag. I zip the foot closed and tie some cord around
            the end to keep it from moving around too much. I cant lie diagonal
            but I am able to move around. The seamstresses charged me about $20.

            Combining these two options and wearing a fleece top and bottoms to
            bed, I was comfortable down to 15F in early December. I also chose my
            campsite carefully, as I picked a well sheltered site in some pines.

            Nate



            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...> wrote:
            >
            > i made a insulated hammock last year that i'm still using.
            > i used insulation i got from ed speer (don't remember what it
            was called) but you could use quilt batting from wal-mart.
            >
            >
            > chcoa <jdeben@...> wrote: The last few times I've been out in my
            hammock it was cold enough that
            > I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
            > generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
            > without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
            > had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
            > with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
            > cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
            > clothes.
            >
            > I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
            > but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
            > functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.
            >
            > Thanks
            > Jamie in AZ
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
            > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • ian toal
            Nate, I m wondering what your mummy bag was rated for ? Ian Nate wrote: Jamie, I have done a few
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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              Nate,

              I'm wondering what your mummy bag was rated for ?

              Ian

              Nate <natesdenn71@...> wrote: Jamie,
              I have done a few things to reduce the likely hood I will need to add
              a pad.

              First, I purchased a backpacker poncho from campmor. This is the long
              version. It has loops on the corners. I suspend this under my
              hammock. I placed draw cords in the short ends to snug it up against
              the hammock. The long ends are unmodified. No sewing was required.
              The poncho was about $15 plus shipping and it is now my rain gear for
              when I want to go light weight or when I hammock.

              Second, I had my slumberjack mummy bag modified at a local seamstress.
              I had them add in a foot zipper. This allows me to pass the hammock
              ropes through the bag. I zip the foot closed and tie some cord around
              the end to keep it from moving around too much. I cant lie diagonal
              but I am able to move around. The seamstresses charged me about $20.

              Combining these two options and wearing a fleece top and bottoms to
              bed, I was comfortable down to 15F in early December. I also chose my
              campsite carefully, as I picked a well sheltered site in some pines.

              Nate

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...> wrote:
              >
              > i made a insulated hammock last year that i'm still using.
              > i used insulation i got from ed speer (don't remember what it
              was called) but you could use quilt batting from wal-mart.
              >
              >
              > chcoa <jdeben@...> wrote: The last few times I've been out in my
              hammock it was cold enough that
              > I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
              > generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
              > without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
              > had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
              > with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
              > cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
              > clothes.
              >
              > I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
              > but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
              > functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.
              >
              > Thanks
              > Jamie in AZ
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
              > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >






              ---------------------------------
              Don't pick lemons.
              See all the new 2007 cars at Yahoo! Autos.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Rosaleen Sullivan
              Jamie- How cold are you trying to go? I don t carry a thermometer, but have had good luck on chilly nights with suspending a length of fleece under the
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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                Jamie-

                How cold are you trying to go? I don't carry a thermometer, but have had good luck on chilly nights with suspending a length of fleece under the hammock. Add a thin pad from Gossamer Gear on top of the fleece and/or space blanket outside it. The space blanket will block wind, as well as help a bit with trapping heat. Make a casing in the two long ends of a length of fleece and run shock cord through that tunnel, then tie those ends around the outside ends of the hammock You can snug the fleece close with more elastic used to tie the sides at the pullouts. The fleece will hold one of the thin pads that crumple up against the hammock, once you tune this just right.

                If you want to go dual-use, cut a slit in the fleece for a neckhole, inserting a zipper. Now you have a tunic to wear around camp or even hiking, if you like...

                Cheers!

                Rosaleen

                Blue pad blues, still
                Posted by: "chcoa" jdeben@...<mailto:jdeben@...> chcoa
                Date: Thu Mar 15, 2007 11:33 pm ((PDT))

                The last few times I've been out in my hammock it was cold enough that
                I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
                generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
                without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold so I
                had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the pad
                with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
                cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
                clothes.

                I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
                but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
                functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.

                Thanks
                Jamie in AZ



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mike Swaine
                Jamie, Being an Arizona boy also, I had this same problem, wet blue pad. I posted the situation acouple of years ago and got prodigious amounts of advice, most
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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                  Jamie,
                  Being an Arizona boy also, I had this same problem, wet blue pad. I posted the situation
                  acouple of years ago and got prodigious amounts of advice, most leading to stop wearing
                  cotton and switch to silk or polyester. I bought myself poyester underwear (longjohns-shirt &
                  pants-fashionably black) and I have not had a drop on my backside since, even when
                  becoming over heated.

                  Mike in Phx
                • chcoa
                  Hi Nate, Thanks for your thoughts. I actually use a very simular set up to yours already but instead of the poncho I use a modified neatsheet as the outer
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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                    Hi Nate,

                    Thanks for your thoughts. I actually use a very simular set up to
                    yours already but instead of the poncho I use a modified neatsheet
                    as the outer insulation. I have a bag that goes fully around the
                    hammock too. This works well to around freezing for me but loer
                    than that and I need a little more on by lower torso and but area.
                    This is generall where the CCF comes in since I carry one with with
                    me anyway as a sit pad and to give more support to my backpack.

                    I like the poncho idea though and that is certainly cheep enough.
                    How much does your poncho weight?

                    jamie in AZ

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Nate" <natesdenn71@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Jamie,
                    > I have done a few things to reduce the likely hood I will need to
                    add
                    > a pad.
                    >
                    > First, I purchased a backpacker poncho from campmor. This is the
                    long
                    > version. It has loops on the corners. I suspend this under my
                    > hammock. I placed draw cords in the short ends to snug it up
                    against
                    > the hammock. The long ends are unmodified. No sewing was
                    required.
                    > The poncho was about $15 plus shipping and it is now my rain gear
                    for
                    > when I want to go light weight or when I hammock.
                    >
                    > Second, I had my slumberjack mummy bag modified at a local
                    seamstress.
                    > I had them add in a foot zipper. This allows me to pass the
                    hammock
                    > ropes through the bag. I zip the foot closed and tie some cord
                    around
                    > the end to keep it from moving around too much. I cant lie
                    diagonal
                    > but I am able to move around. The seamstresses charged me about
                    $20.
                    >
                    > Combining these two options and wearing a fleece top and bottoms to
                    > bed, I was comfortable down to 15F in early December. I also
                    chose my
                    > campsite carefully, as I picked a well sheltered site in some
                    pines.
                    >
                    > Nate
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@>
                    wrote:
                    > >
                    > > i made a insulated hammock last year that i'm still using.
                    > > i used insulation i got from ed speer (don't remember
                    what it
                    > was called) but you could use quilt batting from wal-mart.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > chcoa <jdeben@> wrote: The last few times I've been out in my
                    > hammock it was cold enough that
                    > > I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
                    > > generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much
                    better
                    > > without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too
                    cold so I
                    > > had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on
                    the pad
                    > > with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in
                    some
                    > > cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of
                    my
                    > > clothes.
                    > >
                    > > I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this
                    group
                    > > but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
                    > > functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.
                    > >
                    > > Thanks
                    > > Jamie in AZ
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ---------------------------------
                    > > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
                    > > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                  • chcoa
                    Hi Mike, Thanks for the advice. I do only wear wicking layers generally, unless it s summer and then I don t need the CCF. For me the CCF only comes into
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 16, 2007
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                      Hi Mike,

                      Thanks for the advice. I do only wear wicking layers generally,
                      unless it's summer and then I don't need the CCF. For me the CCF
                      only comes into play under freezing. I alwasy have poly under"wear"
                      layers on and usually some thickness of fleece pants and
                      pullover/jacket.

                      I was hoping some of the SPE and homemade SPE folks would jump in
                      and give me an idea of what kinds of fabrics have helped with this
                      issue. Silk would probably do the trick, has anyone had luck with
                      this fabric?

                      BTW Mike, have you encountered many other hangers in your AZ travels?
                      I haven't.

                      jamie

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Swaine" <mswaine@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Jamie,
                      > Being an Arizona boy also, I had this same problem, wet blue pad.
                      I posted the situation
                      > acouple of years ago and got prodigious amounts of advice, most
                      leading to stop wearing
                      > cotton and switch to silk or polyester. I bought myself poyester
                      underwear (longjohns-shirt &
                      > pants-fashionably black) and I have not had a drop on my backside
                      since, even when
                      > becoming over heated.
                      >
                      > Mike in Phx
                      >
                    • Mike Swaine
                      Jamie, I encounter very few hangers in AZ, but then I m an assistant Scoutmaster, backpacking once a month, so I m well insulated by 40-50 young scouters from
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 17, 2007
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                        Jamie,
                        I encounter very few hangers in AZ, but then I'm an assistant Scoutmaster, backpacking once
                        a month, so I'm well insulated by 40-50 young scouters from other campers. They tend not
                        to camp nearby. Only one of my fellow adult campers has opted for a tree sling, but a few of
                        the kids have tried them out. When I set up at Geronimo I get all kinds of folks lurking,
                        curious about my Hennessey setup and several of the older Boy Scouts have day hammocks
                        for lounging at Scout Camp. I was hooked on hammocking the first time I tried one (slept
                        through the night) and have probably logged close to a hundred night hangin' to date. It's
                        the perfect resting place.

                        Regards, Mike
                      • Nate
                        Ian and Jamie, My bag is synthetic fill (polarguard 3d) and rated to 20F. I have had this bag since 2001. My poncho is the Outdoor Products Multi purpose
                        Message 11 of 13 , Mar 17, 2007
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                          Ian and Jamie,
                          My bag is synthetic fill (polarguard 3d) and rated to 20F. I have had
                          this bag since 2001.

                          My poncho is the Outdoor Products Multi purpose poncho LONG. I have
                          not actually weighed it, but the product description says 9oz. I make
                          sure to tie the hood closed when I put it under the hammock. Once I
                          forgot to untie it. My hiking buddy laughed as I tried to put the
                          poncho on forgetting that I had not untied the hood.

                          I recently made a SPE from some walmart fabric. I made it from a very
                          water resistant orange nylon fabric. This is the same stuff the outer
                          layer of my quilt is made from. Wings were sewn from left overs from
                          the inside of my quilt which is a lighter weave non water resistant
                          nylon. I have not tested it under field conditions yet. I sewed the
                          whole thing by hand. Four hours and a bottle of wine later it was
                          done. We will see how long it holds up.

                          I too carry a blue foam as the frame for my G4. My homemade SPE with
                          wing pads inserted folds nicely and fits into the frame pocket adding
                          some more rigidity.

                          Nate

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > The last few times I've been out in my hammock it was cold enough
                          that
                          > > I had to use a CCF pad inside directly under my body. I don't
                          > > generally do this because I like the feel of the hammock much better
                          > > without the less than forgiving pad. BUT the temps were too cold
                          so I
                          > > had to do it. I'm really not fond of the moisture build up on the
                          pad
                          > > with this option. I hate waking up damp on my backside and in some
                          > > cases this would be a problem because I might be wearing all of my
                          > > clothes.
                          > >
                          > > I have read a few ideas over the months I've been part of this group
                          > > but I'm curious if anyone has come up with a really light and
                          > > functional solution that doesn't cost more than $40 bucks.
                          > >
                          > > Thanks
                          > > Jamie in AZ
                          > >
                          >
                          > Jamie,
                          >
                          > When I use a CCF pad I have some nylon material between the pad and
                          > me, either in a two-layer hammock or with a SPE or some other similar
                          > arrangement. That has tamed the insensible perspiration issue for me
                          > as the small amount of moisture mostly wicks away on the nylon
                          > material and evaporates into the air. Now if I am overheating and
                          > sweating, that raises the problem and I have more moisture to deal
                          > with... I adjust my insulation to cool off and try to avoid
                          > overheating. When I use thick CCF pads in cooler weather I use the
                          > RidgeRest on top for comfort and I suspect the ridges in it might help
                          > some with perspiration issues as moisture sometimes accumulates in the
                          > ridges. Other times when I use a SPE I will put my fleece jacket
                          > inside the main compartment of the SPE to get more insulation and even
                          > more effective wicking action.
                          >
                          > When I have used CCF pads, I have always had the breathable hammock
                          > fabric along the edges of the pads without anything else to impede the
                          > flow of air and usually had no bugnet over my hammock. I noticed from
                          > your prior post that you sometimes use the SuperShelter and I was
                          > under the impression that was made of a non-breathable material, ie
                          > silnylon. You need fresh air movement to some degree to carry away
                          > moisture. I know everyone realizes that moisture will just continue
                          > to accumulate if you are generating moisture faster than it can wick
                          > away and evaporate, but sometimes it helps to recall that so you can
                          > think of possible solutions for your situation.
                          >
                          > In general, non-breathable is best in cooler and windy conditions
                          > while breathable is best in warmer and static conditions. We can
                          > either adjust the breathability of our insulation or live with what we
                          > chose when the conditions are not optimum for what we chose. You can
                          > have insulation that you swear by in the right conditions, swear at in
                          > the wrong conditions and it works okay in most conditions... and that
                          > is not all that uncommon. The Hennessy Hammocks have sewn-in
                          > bugnetting that actually impedes the flow of fresh air that is needed
                          > to help control perspiration issues... bugnetting affects
                          > breathability. When there is some air movement due to wind, a bugnet
                          > might be just the ticket as it limits the air movement and keeps
                          > everything comfortable. However, when there is no wind and it is
                          > humid, a bugnet in a small space like a hammock can make it feel as
                          > humid as a sauna. I suspect the SuperShelter is the same in regards
                          > to wind, humidity and mositure buildup due to perspiration.
                          >
                          > A few years ago I made a hammock tarptent to use in winter
                          > conditions. In the right conditions it works great but in the wrong
                          > conditions it doesn't. Even when it stays cold, it works great when
                          > there is wind and it builds up humidity when the wind stops... you can
                          > see the humid air you exhale either gracefully exit the ends of the
                          > tarp or go up and not make it all the way to the end of the tarp
                          > before it condenses on the tarp. I can get out of my warm bed and
                          > adjust it for whatever the wind is doing, but the wind often comes and
                          > goes during the night... for some reason it just doesn't always
                          > cooperate with me <grin>. I very seldom feel like getting up and
                          > making adjustments when it is cold and I am warm, so I just make my
                          > best guess as to how I want to set it up before I turn in for the
                          > night and try to make the best of it. Besides, I always figure that
                          > if I get up and adjust it because the wind stopped, then the wind will
                          > pick back up about the time I get back in my hammock and rewarm myself.
                          >
                          > Dave
                          > aka Youngblood
                          >
                        • chcoa
                          Thank you Dave. I no longer use the Supershelter or my HH. I now have a top entry style hammock. I think I will try using a nylon layer or simular, maybe
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 18, 2007
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                            Thank you Dave. I no longer use the Supershelter or my HH. I now
                            have a top entry style hammock. I think I will try using a nylon
                            layer or simular, maybe silk, to see if that helps. I always wear
                            wicking clothing and usually I'm not wet but my outer layer will be
                            and that is concerning to me when I don't usually carry extra
                            clothing.

                            I have noticed it more now that I ahve the sleeping bag completely
                            around the hammock. I think you are certainly hitting on something
                            with regard to the air flow issue. I'll hopefully have a chance to
                            try out some different options one of these days.

                            Jamie in AZ

                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > When I use a CCF pad I have some nylon material between the pad and
                            > me, either in a two-layer hammock or with a SPE or some other
                            similar
                            > arrangement. That has tamed the insensible perspiration issue for
                            me
                            > as the small amount of moisture mostly wicks away on the nylon
                            > material and evaporates into the air. Now if I am overheating and
                            > sweating, that raises the problem and I have more moisture to deal
                            > with... I adjust my insulation to cool off and try to avoid
                            > overheating. When I use thick CCF pads in cooler weather I use the
                            > RidgeRest on top for comfort and I suspect the ridges in it might
                            help
                            > some with perspiration issues as moisture sometimes accumulates in
                            the
                            > ridges. Other times when I use a SPE I will put my fleece jacket
                            > inside the main compartment of the SPE to get more insulation and
                            even
                            > more effective wicking action.
                            >
                            > When I have used CCF pads, I have always had the breathable hammock
                            > fabric along the edges of the pads without anything else to impede
                            the
                            > flow of air and usually had no bugnet over my hammock. I noticed
                            from
                            > your prior post that you sometimes use the SuperShelter and I was
                            > under the impression that was made of a non-breathable material, ie
                            > silnylon. You need fresh air movement to some degree to carry away
                            > moisture. I know everyone realizes that moisture will just
                            continue
                            > to accumulate if you are generating moisture faster than it can
                            wick
                            > away and evaporate, but sometimes it helps to recall that so you
                            can
                            > think of possible solutions for your situation.
                            >
                            > In general, non-breathable is best in cooler and windy conditions
                            > while breathable is best in warmer and static conditions. We can
                            > either adjust the breathability of our insulation or live with
                            what we
                            > chose when the conditions are not optimum for what we chose. You
                            can
                            > have insulation that you swear by in the right conditions, swear
                            at in
                            > the wrong conditions and it works okay in most conditions... and
                            that
                            > is not all that uncommon. The Hennessy Hammocks have sewn-in
                            > bugnetting that actually impedes the flow of fresh air that is
                            needed
                            > to help control perspiration issues... bugnetting affects
                            > breathability. When there is some air movement due to wind, a
                            bugnet
                            > might be just the ticket as it limits the air movement and keeps
                            > everything comfortable. However, when there is no wind and it is
                            > humid, a bugnet in a small space like a hammock can make it feel as
                            > humid as a sauna. I suspect the SuperShelter is the same in
                            regards
                            > to wind, humidity and mositure buildup due to perspiration.
                            >
                            > A few years ago I made a hammock tarptent to use in winter
                            > conditions. In the right conditions it works great but in the
                            wrong
                            > conditions it doesn't. Even when it stays cold, it works great
                            when
                            > there is wind and it builds up humidity when the wind stops... you
                            can
                            > see the humid air you exhale either gracefully exit the ends of the
                            > tarp or go up and not make it all the way to the end of the tarp
                            > before it condenses on the tarp. I can get out of my warm bed and
                            > adjust it for whatever the wind is doing, but the wind often comes
                            and
                            > goes during the night... for some reason it just doesn't always
                            > cooperate with me <grin>. I very seldom feel like getting up and
                            > making adjustments when it is cold and I am warm, so I just make my
                            > best guess as to how I want to set it up before I turn in for the
                            > night and try to make the best of it. Besides, I always figure
                            that
                            > if I get up and adjust it because the wind stopped, then the wind
                            will
                            > pick back up about the time I get back in my hammock and rewarm
                            myself.
                            >
                            > Dave
                            > aka Youngblood
                            >
                          • chcoa
                            Hi Mike, I agree, I m hooked too. After having my own children I haven t been able to sleep on the ground very comfortably so the hammock was a dream for me.
                            Message 13 of 13 , Mar 18, 2007
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                              Hi Mike,
                              I agree, I'm hooked too. After having my own children I haven't
                              been able to sleep on the ground very comfortably so the hammock was
                              a dream for me.

                              I hike with a few different groups and I always have people
                              interested in the setup and those who think I'm crazy. In fact last
                              time I was out, I had a very well meaning and loving couple give me
                              an open invite to come and seek refuge in their RV when I became too
                              cold during the night. They were convinced I was nuts and would be
                              needing help before morning.

                              That's neat you have helped some scouts convert. I'd love to say I
                              have influenced a ground dweller but I dont' think I have. Kind of
                              like using a tarp there is a little more know-ho and work so I think
                              most people are content to stick with the easy old faithful tent.
                              No complaints from me, then I don't have to compete for only two
                              suitable trees. Ahhh AZ!!!

                              Take care
                              Jamie in AZ

                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Swaine" <mswaine@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > Jamie,
                              > I encounter very few hangers in AZ, but then I'm an assistant
                              Scoutmaster, backpacking once
                              > a month, so I'm well insulated by 40-50 young scouters from other
                              campers. They tend not
                              > to camp nearby. Only one of my fellow adult campers has opted for
                              a tree sling, but a few of
                              > the kids have tried them out. When I set up at Geronimo I get all
                              kinds of folks lurking,
                              > curious about my Hennessey setup and several of the older Boy
                              Scouts have day hammocks
                              > for lounging at Scout Camp. I was hooked on hammocking the first
                              time I tried one (slept
                              > through the night) and have probably logged close to a hundred
                              night hangin' to date. It's
                              > the perfect resting place.
                              >
                              > Regards, Mike
                              >
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