Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re:[Fwd: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a Lungi] - photos posted

Expand Messages
  • Rosalind Suit
    Thanks again, CL !! Hope you post the photos/directions/etc. on the WH s site, too !! You may have just started a new trail-related fad!! Rosie mdhiker
    Message 1 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks again, CL !! Hope you post the photos/directions/etc. on the WH's site, too !!
      You may have just started a new trail-related fad!!

      Rosie
      mdhiker

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ij santiago
      where can i find a lungi.......i live in georgia. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        where can i find a lungi.......i live in georgia.

        On 3/8/07, Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've posted the photos on the HammockCamping site under 'How to tie a
        > Lungi" More details are below.
        >
        > -------- Original Message --------
        > Subject: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a Lungi
        > Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2007 11:12:52 +0800
        > From: Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...<caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net>
        > >
        > To: Rosalind Suit <rosalind.suit@... <rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
        > >
        > References: <002801c75e6a$ca6d6620$bc02fea9@rosalind9aa401>
        >
        > Hi Rosie,
        >
        > A lungi is a tube. Sarongs are rectangle cloths.
        >
        > The width of the tube can be whatever you want or need: 1.5 yards, 2
        > yards, 2.5 yards. You adjust the width based on your own width. When I
        > was in high school, 1.5 was plenty of room. Now, I prefer 2 yards.
        >
        > Length: The trick here is to find a bolt with the right pattern and the
        > right width. Hemming adds time and weight. I like my lungis to be
        > 40-46 inches long. After I put them on and tie them up, they're just
        > right. Too long and you trip over it and it's also unnecessary weight.
        > Traditionally, however, they're supposed to go down to your ankles.
        >
        > I've not found good pictoral instructions. I got my husband to take a
        > series of photos. Here is the description and I've noted which part
        > fits which picture.
        >
        > How to tie it on: Step through (TyingALungi-01.JPG). Gather the top of
        > the lungi into two rabbit ears (TyingALungi-02.JPG, TyingALungi-03.JPGm
        > and TyingALungi-04.JPG). In front of you, looking down, it will look a
        > little like this ---^^---, with the ^ being the rabbit ears. You'll
        > know you've got the width of the lungi about right if your rabbit ears
        > are 6-10 inches long (too short and they come undone, too long and it's
        > a waste, waist, of cloth). If you've pulled out the rabbit ears right,
        > the rest of the cloth should be against your waist (TyingALungi-04.JPG).
        > Now, cross one rabbit ear over the other (TyingALungi-05.JPG) and
        > twist (TyingALungi-06.JPG) the two tight against your waist
        > (TyingALungi-07.JPG). I guess you could think about the rabbit ears
        > doing a do-se-do as in contra and square dancing. The rabbit ears
        > should end up on the side they started. Tuck them into the lungi and
        > you're done (TyingALungi-08.JPG). Note, the knot is not tied. The knot
        > is really a twist that's tucked in.
        >
        > The standard for Bangladeshi men is to wear the resulting knot full
        > center (for good reasons...). I find it more attractive on women if the
        > knot's worn off-center. The knot isn't a real knot, but if you've tied
        > it snug against your waist, it holds well and makes for nice pleating
        > down the length of the lungi. So, running, biking, and climbing trees
        > are all possible in a lungi. If it starts to work loose, it's easy to
        > pull the rabbit ears out and tighten them up again. In Bangladesh, the
        > men use the rabbit ears for pockets.
        >
        > Being a tube, lungis can last longer than a sarong, especially if you
        > rotate and flip the tube each time you wear it. My first few lungis
        > gave way when I squatted down to pick something up and duct-tape on a
        > lungi isn't very satisfactory.
        >
        > CL
        >
        > Rosalind Suit wrote:
        > > Cara Lin,
        > >
        > > I've tried googling lungi/longi to get an idea of how much material,
        > > length and width, make up the item. I also wanted some pictorial
        > > instruction on how to tie the thing. Any suggestions? I've saved your
        > > description of how you change, but I'm not sure if it's a sewn tube of
        > > material, or a rectangular cloth. thanks
        > >
        > > Rosie/mdhiker
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Carey Parks
        Sounds like any fabric store or the fabric department in your favorite big box store would have one - they just don t know it. Buy a couple yards of thin
        Message 3 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Sounds like any fabric store or the fabric department in your favorite big
          box store would have one - they just don't know it. Buy a couple yards of
          thin cotton that pleases your eye and sew the ends together making a tube.
          You can even try on the fabric to find the right amount to buy.

          But don't believe me, I'm the one who started this thread. One of the
          experts will no doubt chime in.

          Cheers,

          Carey

          -----Original Message-----
          From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of ij santiago
          Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2007 1:21 PM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] [Fwd: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a
          Lungi] - photos posted


          where can i find a lungi.......i live in georgia.

          On 3/8/07, Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've posted the photos on the HammockCamping site under 'How to tie a
          > Lungi" More details are below.
          >
          > -------- Original Message --------
          > Subject: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a Lungi
          > Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2007 11:12:52 +0800
          > From: Cara Lin Bridgman
          <caralinb@...<caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net>
          > >
          > To: Rosalind Suit <rosalind.suit@...
          <rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
          > >
          > References: <002801c75e6a$ca6d6620$bc02fea9@rosalind9aa401>
          >
          > Hi Rosie,
          >
          > A lungi is a tube. Sarongs are rectangle cloths.
          >
          > The width of the tube can be whatever you want or need: 1.5 yards, 2
          > yards, 2.5 yards. You adjust the width based on your own width. When I
          > was in high school, 1.5 was plenty of room. Now, I prefer 2 yards.
          >
          > Length: The trick here is to find a bolt with the right pattern and the
          > right width. Hemming adds time and weight. I like my lungis to be
          > 40-46 inches long. After I put them on and tie them up, they're just
          > right. Too long and you trip over it and it's also unnecessary weight.
          > Traditionally, however, they're supposed to go down to your ankles.
          >
          > I've not found good pictoral instructions. I got my husband to take a
          > series of photos. Here is the description and I've noted which part
          > fits which picture.
          >
          > How to tie it on: Step through (TyingALungi-01.JPG). Gather the top of
          > the lungi into two rabbit ears (TyingALungi-02.JPG, TyingALungi-03.JPGm
          > and TyingALungi-04.JPG). In front of you, looking down, it will look a
          > little like this ---^^---, with the ^ being the rabbit ears. You'll
          > know you've got the width of the lungi about right if your rabbit ears
          > are 6-10 inches long (too short and they come undone, too long and it's
          > a waste, waist, of cloth). If you've pulled out the rabbit ears right,
          > the rest of the cloth should be against your waist (TyingALungi-04.JPG).
          > Now, cross one rabbit ear over the other (TyingALungi-05.JPG) and
          > twist (TyingALungi-06.JPG) the two tight against your waist
          > (TyingALungi-07.JPG). I guess you could think about the rabbit ears
          > doing a do-se-do as in contra and square dancing. The rabbit ears
          > should end up on the side they started. Tuck them into the lungi and
          > you're done (TyingALungi-08.JPG). Note, the knot is not tied. The knot
          > is really a twist that's tucked in.
          >
          > The standard for Bangladeshi men is to wear the resulting knot full
          > center (for good reasons...). I find it more attractive on women if the
          > knot's worn off-center. The knot isn't a real knot, but if you've tied
          > it snug against your waist, it holds well and makes for nice pleating
          > down the length of the lungi. So, running, biking, and climbing trees
          > are all possible in a lungi. If it starts to work loose, it's easy to
          > pull the rabbit ears out and tighten them up again. In Bangladesh, the
          > men use the rabbit ears for pockets.
          >
          > Being a tube, lungis can last longer than a sarong, especially if you
          > rotate and flip the tube each time you wear it. My first few lungis
          > gave way when I squatted down to pick something up and duct-tape on a
          > lungi isn't very satisfactory.
          >
          > CL
          >
          > Rosalind Suit wrote:
          > > Cara Lin,
          > >
          > > I've tried googling lungi/longi to get an idea of how much material,
          > > length and width, make up the item. I also wanted some pictorial
          > > instruction on how to tie the thing. Any suggestions? I've saved your
          > > description of how you change, but I'm not sure if it's a sewn tube of
          > > material, or a rectangular cloth. thanks
          > >
          > > Rosie/mdhiker
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ij santiago
          can t sew to safe my life!!!!! ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            can't sew to safe my life!!!!!

            On 3/8/07, Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
            >
            > Sounds like any fabric store or the fabric department in your favorite
            > big
            > box store would have one - they just don't know it. Buy a couple yards of
            > thin cotton that pleases your eye and sew the ends together making a tube.
            > You can even try on the fabric to find the right amount to buy.
            >
            > But don't believe me, I'm the one who started this thread. One of the
            > experts will no doubt chime in.
            >
            > Cheers,
            >
            > Carey
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
            > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>]On
            > Behalf Of ij santiago
            > Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2007 1:21 PM
            > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] [Fwd: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a
            > Lungi] - photos posted
            >
            > where can i find a lungi.......i live in georgia.
            >
            > On 3/8/07, Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...<caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net>>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > I've posted the photos on the HammockCamping site under 'How to tie a
            > > Lungi" More details are below.
            > >
            > > -------- Original Message --------
            > > Subject: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a Lungi
            > > Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2007 11:12:52 +0800
            > > From: Cara Lin Bridgman
            > <caralinb@... <caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net><caralinb%40ms68.
            > hinet.net>
            > > >
            > > To: Rosalind Suit <rosalind.suit@...<rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
            > <rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
            > > >
            > > References: <002801c75e6a$ca6d6620$bc02fea9@rosalind9aa401>
            > >
            > > Hi Rosie,
            > >
            > > A lungi is a tube. Sarongs are rectangle cloths.
            > >
            > > The width of the tube can be whatever you want or need: 1.5 yards, 2
            > > yards, 2.5 yards. You adjust the width based on your own width. When I
            > > was in high school, 1.5 was plenty of room. Now, I prefer 2 yards.
            > >
            > > Length: The trick here is to find a bolt with the right pattern and the
            > > right width. Hemming adds time and weight. I like my lungis to be
            > > 40-46 inches long. After I put them on and tie them up, they're just
            > > right. Too long and you trip over it and it's also unnecessary weight.
            > > Traditionally, however, they're supposed to go down to your ankles.
            > >
            > > I've not found good pictoral instructions. I got my husband to take a
            > > series of photos. Here is the description and I've noted which part
            > > fits which picture.
            > >
            > > How to tie it on: Step through (TyingALungi-01.JPG). Gather the top of
            > > the lungi into two rabbit ears (TyingALungi-02.JPG, TyingALungi-03.JPGm
            > > and TyingALungi-04.JPG). In front of you, looking down, it will look a
            > > little like this ---^^---, with the ^ being the rabbit ears. You'll
            > > know you've got the width of the lungi about right if your rabbit ears
            > > are 6-10 inches long (too short and they come undone, too long and it's
            > > a waste, waist, of cloth). If you've pulled out the rabbit ears right,
            > > the rest of the cloth should be against your waist (TyingALungi-04.JPG).
            > > Now, cross one rabbit ear over the other (TyingALungi-05.JPG) and
            > > twist (TyingALungi-06.JPG) the two tight against your waist
            > > (TyingALungi-07.JPG). I guess you could think about the rabbit ears
            > > doing a do-se-do as in contra and square dancing. The rabbit ears
            > > should end up on the side they started. Tuck them into the lungi and
            > > you're done (TyingALungi-08.JPG). Note, the knot is not tied. The knot
            > > is really a twist that's tucked in.
            > >
            > > The standard for Bangladeshi men is to wear the resulting knot full
            > > center (for good reasons...). I find it more attractive on women if the
            > > knot's worn off-center. The knot isn't a real knot, but if you've tied
            > > it snug against your waist, it holds well and makes for nice pleating
            > > down the length of the lungi. So, running, biking, and climbing trees
            > > are all possible in a lungi. If it starts to work loose, it's easy to
            > > pull the rabbit ears out and tighten them up again. In Bangladesh, the
            > > men use the rabbit ears for pockets.
            > >
            > > Being a tube, lungis can last longer than a sarong, especially if you
            > > rotate and flip the tube each time you wear it. My first few lungis
            > > gave way when I squatted down to pick something up and duct-tape on a
            > > lungi isn't very satisfactory.
            > >
            > > CL
            > >
            > > Rosalind Suit wrote:
            > > > Cara Lin,
            > > >
            > > > I've tried googling lungi/longi to get an idea of how much material,
            > > > length and width, make up the item. I also wanted some pictorial
            > > > instruction on how to tie the thing. Any suggestions? I've saved your
            > > > description of how you change, but I'm not sure if it's a sewn tube of
            > > > material, or a rectangular cloth. thanks
            > > >
            > > > Rosie/mdhiker
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James Wampler
            How are lungi s better than pants? _________________________________________________________________ Check the weather nationwide with MSN Search: Try it now!
            Message 5 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              How are lungi's better than pants?


              _________________________________________________________________
              Check the weather nationwide with MSN Search: Try it now!
              http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=weather&FORM=WLMTAG

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jamesdwampler
              Sorry guys! I sent out a reply through my email, it probably would be better to do here - but what exactly is the benefit of a lungi over pants?
              Message 6 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Sorry guys! I sent out a reply through my email, it probably would be
                better to do here - but what exactly is the benefit of a lungi over
                pants?
              • cass-rjp@sulat.msuiit.edu.ph
                Hi everybody! eveybody is talking about the the lungi. Why not use the malong of the maaranao tribe of southern Philippines instead. Its a piece of cloth (a
                Message 7 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi everybody!
                  eveybody is talking about the the lungi. Why not use the "malong" of the
                  maaranao tribe of southern Philippines instead. Its a piece of cloth (a tube in
                  fact)very similar to the lungi the only difference is that its 6 to 8 ft long.
                  You can use it as a blanket, towel, kilt, etc. The maranao tribesmen even made
                  a dance of the 101 ways to use the malong. They even use for it
                  sunshade, privacy curtain, temporary hammock for infants, blanket, towel etc.
                  Its very
                  practical and the only difference with the lungi is the length. In the southern
                  philippines it is usually made of
                  cotton although some malong used by the local "royalty" are made of silk,
                  good quality cotton, or indonesian "batik". Anyway just follow the instruction
                  on how to make a lungi but add a few ft. just enough to cover you from head to
                  foot. I once saw a basketball team of maranao tribesmen attired in malong (worn
                  like a kilt) and jersey.One member of the team even took a siesta break by
                  untying his malong and extending it full length to cover his head. All i could
                  say is that the game was "unique" and "interesting." Women can wear the malong
                  too by tying it up at armpit level or tying a knot above the right or left
                  shoulder.

                  Rene

                  Quoting ij santiago <snoopylives1@...>:

                  > can't sew to safe my life!!!!!
                  >
                  > On 3/8/07, Carey Parks <cjp129@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Sounds like any fabric store or the fabric department in your favorite
                  > > big
                  > > box store would have one - they just don't know it. Buy a couple yards of
                  > > thin cotton that pleases your eye and sew the ends together making a tube.
                  > > You can even try on the fabric to find the right amount to buy.
                  > >
                  > > But don't believe me, I'm the one who started this thread. One of the
                  > > experts will no doubt chime in.
                  > >
                  > > Cheers,
                  > >
                  > > Carey
                  > >
                  > > -----Original Message-----
                  > > From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  > <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>]On
                  > > Behalf Of ij santiago
                  > > Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2007 1:21 PM
                  > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com <hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>
                  > > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] [Fwd: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a
                  > > Lungi] - photos posted
                  > >
                  > > where can i find a lungi.......i live in georgia.
                  > >
                  > > On 3/8/07, Cara Lin Bridgman
                  > <caralinb@...<caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net>>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I've posted the photos on the HammockCamping site under 'How to tie a
                  > > > Lungi" More details are below.
                  > > >
                  > > > -------- Original Message --------
                  > > > Subject: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a Lungi
                  > > > Date: Mon, 05 Mar 2007 11:12:52 +0800
                  > > > From: Cara Lin Bridgman
                  > > <caralinb@... <caralinb%40ms68.hinet.net><caralinb%40ms68.
                  > > hinet.net>
                  > > > >
                  > > > To: Rosalind Suit
                  > <rosalind.suit@...<rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
                  > > <rosalind.suit%40verizon.net>
                  > > > >
                  > > > References: <002801c75e6a$ca6d6620$bc02fea9@rosalind9aa401>
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi Rosie,
                  > > >
                  > > > A lungi is a tube. Sarongs are rectangle cloths.
                  > > >
                  > > > The width of the tube can be whatever you want or need: 1.5 yards, 2
                  > > > yards, 2.5 yards. You adjust the width based on your own width. When I
                  > > > was in high school, 1.5 was plenty of room. Now, I prefer 2 yards.
                  > > >
                  > > > Length: The trick here is to find a bolt with the right pattern and the
                  > > > right width. Hemming adds time and weight. I like my lungis to be
                  > > > 40-46 inches long. After I put them on and tie them up, they're just
                  > > > right. Too long and you trip over it and it's also unnecessary weight.
                  > > > Traditionally, however, they're supposed to go down to your ankles.
                  > > >
                  > > > I've not found good pictoral instructions. I got my husband to take a
                  > > > series of photos. Here is the description and I've noted which part
                  > > > fits which picture.
                  > > >
                  > > > How to tie it on: Step through (TyingALungi-01.JPG). Gather the top of
                  > > > the lungi into two rabbit ears (TyingALungi-02.JPG, TyingALungi-03.JPGm
                  > > > and TyingALungi-04.JPG). In front of you, looking down, it will look a
                  > > > little like this ---^^---, with the ^ being the rabbit ears. You'll
                  > > > know you've got the width of the lungi about right if your rabbit ears
                  > > > are 6-10 inches long (too short and they come undone, too long and it's
                  > > > a waste, waist, of cloth). If you've pulled out the rabbit ears right,
                  > > > the rest of the cloth should be against your waist (TyingALungi-04.JPG).
                  > > > Now, cross one rabbit ear over the other (TyingALungi-05.JPG) and
                  > > > twist (TyingALungi-06.JPG) the two tight against your waist
                  > > > (TyingALungi-07.JPG). I guess you could think about the rabbit ears
                  > > > doing a do-se-do as in contra and square dancing. The rabbit ears
                  > > > should end up on the side they started. Tuck them into the lungi and
                  > > > you're done (TyingALungi-08.JPG). Note, the knot is not tied. The knot
                  > > > is really a twist that's tucked in.
                  > > >
                  > > > The standard for Bangladeshi men is to wear the resulting knot full
                  > > > center (for good reasons...). I find it more attractive on women if the
                  > > > knot's worn off-center. The knot isn't a real knot, but if you've tied
                  > > > it snug against your waist, it holds well and makes for nice pleating
                  > > > down the length of the lungi. So, running, biking, and climbing trees
                  > > > are all possible in a lungi. If it starts to work loose, it's easy to
                  > > > pull the rabbit ears out and tighten them up again. In Bangladesh, the
                  > > > men use the rabbit ears for pockets.
                  > > >
                  > > > Being a tube, lungis can last longer than a sarong, especially if you
                  > > > rotate and flip the tube each time you wear it. My first few lungis
                  > > > gave way when I squatted down to pick something up and duct-tape on a
                  > > > lungi isn't very satisfactory.
                  > > >
                  > > > CL
                  > > >
                  > > > Rosalind Suit wrote:
                  > > > > Cara Lin,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I've tried googling lungi/longi to get an idea of how much material,
                  > > > > length and width, make up the item. I also wanted some pictorial
                  > > > > instruction on how to tie the thing. Any suggestions? I've saved your
                  > > > > description of how you change, but I'm not sure if it's a sewn tube of
                  > > > > material, or a rectangular cloth. thanks
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Rosie/mdhiker
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >






                  _________________________________________
                  Mindanao State University - Iligan Campus
                  Visit us at http://www.msuiit.edu.ph
                • Carey Parks
                  You can t change you pants with your pants on, but you can change your pants with your lungi on. This whole thread started when I asked how hammockers would
                  Message 8 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You can't change you pants with your pants on, but you can change your pants
                    with your lungi on.

                    This whole thread started when I asked how hammockers would change out of a
                    wet, salty swim suit. I hung my hammock but could not pitch the tarp or
                    stake out the hammock even because the sea breeze was blowing about 15 kts.
                    By evening it would calm down, but I wanted to change into something dry
                    before the sun went down. That's what started the thread. The lungi was
                    suggested as that something dry I should change into. I could just put it
                    on, and slip the suit off the bottom.

                    That said, I expect a lungi would have all the other advantages of a kilt.
                    Check out Risk's page (imrisk.com) for some insight into his experiences
                    with a kilt on the AT.

                    C

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of James Wampler
                    Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2007 4:47 PM
                    To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] [Fwd: Re: changing rooms - How to Tie a
                    Lungi] - photos posted



                    How are lungi's better than pants?

                    __________________________________________________________
                    Check the weather nationwide with MSN Search: Try it now!
                    http://search.msn.com/results.aspx?q=weather&FORM=WLMTAG

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • ij santiago
                    trust me cara, you don t want me near a sewing machine.....but the glue might be the ticket! i will look for silk. cotton and the at, don t mix.... thakx...
                    Message 9 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      trust me cara, you don't want me near a sewing machine.....but the glue
                      might be the ticket!
                      i will look for silk. cotton and the at, don't mix....
                      thakx...

                      On 3/8/07, Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > ij santiago wrote:
                      > > can't sew to safe my life!!!!!
                      >
                      > Well, a lungi could be a good way to start. Few other things require
                      > more elementary sewing than a lungi. Lungis sold in Bangladesh and
                      > other places are sold unsewn.
                      >
                      > I suppose you could staple it together -- but that would add prickliness
                      > and shorten the lungi life-span (rust, for one thing).
                      >
                      > Fabric shops sell fabric glues. You could try gluing the ends together.
                      > If you always have the seam in one of the rabbit ears, then there
                      > would be no stress on the seam.
                      >
                      > CL
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Cara Lin Bridgman
                      ... Well, a lungi could be a good way to start. Few other things require more elementary sewing than a lungi. Lungis sold in Bangladesh and other places are
                      Message 10 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        ij santiago wrote:
                        > can't sew to safe my life!!!!!

                        Well, a lungi could be a good way to start. Few other things require
                        more elementary sewing than a lungi. Lungis sold in Bangladesh and
                        other places are sold unsewn.

                        I suppose you could staple it together -- but that would add prickliness
                        and shorten the lungi life-span (rust, for one thing).

                        Fabric shops sell fabric glues. You could try gluing the ends together.
                        If you always have the seam in one of the rabbit ears, then there
                        would be no stress on the seam.

                        CL
                      • Cara Lin Bridgman
                        Exactly right. I m fond of Madras Plaid, but any cloth would do (hmmm, silk...). Just check bolt width to make sure it suits you. CL
                        Message 11 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                        View Source
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Exactly right. I'm fond of Madras Plaid, but any cloth would do (hmmm,
                          silk...). Just check bolt width to make sure it suits you.

                          CL

                          Carey Parks wrote:
                          > Sounds like any fabric store or the fabric department in your favorite big
                          > box store would have one - they just don't know it. Buy a couple yards of
                          > thin cotton that pleases your eye and sew the ends together making a tube.
                          > You can even try on the fabric to find the right amount to buy.
                        • Cara Lin Bridgman
                          Sewing machine? Who said anything about a sewing machine? Dental floss and a needle is about my limit! And with a lungi, if you sew crooked, it doesn t
                          Message 12 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                          View Source
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Sewing machine? Who said anything about a sewing machine? Dental floss
                            and a needle is about my limit! And with a lungi, if you sew crooked,
                            it doesn't matter.

                            CL

                            ij santiago wrote:
                            > trust me cara, you don't want me near a sewing machine.....but the glue
                            > might be the ticket!
                            > i will look for silk. cotton and the at, don't mix....
                            > thakx...
                          • Cara Lin Bridgman
                            Multi-use -- as others have stated before. Although pants can also be multi-use, the only things they do better than a lungi are save embarrassment if you fall
                            Message 13 of 14 , Mar 8, 2007
                            View Source
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Multi-use -- as others have stated before.

                              Although pants can also be multi-use, the only things they do better
                              than a lungi are save embarrassment if you fall out of a tree or do a
                              Marylin Monroe and reduce entanglement when bushwacking. They are also
                              likely to be warmer when it's cold.

                              Cl

                              jamesdwampler wrote:
                              > what exactly is the benefit of a lungi over pants?
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.