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Re: [Hammock Camping] changing rooms

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    Lungi s are long enough that they supply more than adequate coverage from armpits down. When changing from wet to dry, I start at the bottom. Shoes and socks
    Message 1 of 41 , Mar 3, 2007
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      Lungi's are long enough that they supply more than adequate coverage
      from armpits down.

      When changing from wet to dry, I start at the bottom. Shoes and socks
      off and then feet into flipflops or back into the loose shoes. Then, I
      remove however much is decent. If it's cold, I keep the top half fully
      covered. Then I step into the lungi and pull it up to my waist and a
      little above. I'll hold up the front with my teeth and drop remaining
      bottom layers down. Then I tie up the lungi around my waist and step
      out of the bottom layers now around my ankles. Now, I loosen up the top
      layers and then I loosen up the lungi. I bring the lungi up to my
      armpits underneath my shirt or sweater or whatever. I bring it up from
      the back first, and then from the front. Bringing it up around the
      front can be a bit tricky, especially tying it off (basically, make one
      big fold that is tight around your chest and overlaps the front, then
      roll down the top a time or two to hold it all up). Now I can remove
      all the top layers. When it's cold, my wool beret usually stays on for
      all this. If I was really dirty, I can insert some bathing (i.e. wipe
      downs or tea-cup bath) at each stage. Once I've removed all the wet
      clothes, I'm now in a mostly dry or slightly damp lungi and am covered
      from arm pits to knees (almost). I may tighten up the lungi and wear it
      that way for a while or I can pull a t-shirt on over it all and drop the
      lungi to my waist and retie it. I generally feel the lungi is on more
      securely around my waist than when it's under my arm pits.

      Anyway, the lungi's the easiest and most comfortable thing to wear.

      In Bangladesh, the men do use lungi's to ensure privacy while on the
      toilet (which can be the middle of the field--relief and fertilizing at
      the same time). Women would use their sari's the same way. After
      bathing in a river in the old lungi, men will change into a clean and
      dry lungi by pulling it on over their head and down over the old lungi.
      They can drop the old lungi and tie up the new one without getting the
      new one wet. Women can change saris (rather more complicated) the same way.

      Even though I've done most of my hiking at altitude (2000-4000 m), I've
      lived almost all my life in the sub-tropics: hot and humid. Thin cotton
      dries fast and stays cool.

      CL

      C C Wayah wrote:
      > A kilt would be fine for a man? but not for me
      > Rogene
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Cara Lin Bridgman

      P.O. Box 013 Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
      Longjing Sinjhuang
      Taichung County 434
      Taiwan http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin/
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Lungi s are long enough that they supply more than adequate coverage from armpits down. When changing from wet to dry, I start at the bottom. Shoes and socks
      Message 41 of 41 , Mar 3, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Lungi's are long enough that they supply more than adequate coverage
        from armpits down.

        When changing from wet to dry, I start at the bottom. Shoes and socks
        off and then feet into flipflops or back into the loose shoes. Then, I
        remove however much is decent. If it's cold, I keep the top half fully
        covered. Then I step into the lungi and pull it up to my waist and a
        little above. I'll hold up the front with my teeth and drop remaining
        bottom layers down. Then I tie up the lungi around my waist and step
        out of the bottom layers now around my ankles. Now, I loosen up the top
        layers and then I loosen up the lungi. I bring the lungi up to my
        armpits underneath my shirt or sweater or whatever. I bring it up from
        the back first, and then from the front. Bringing it up around the
        front can be a bit tricky, especially tying it off (basically, make one
        big fold that is tight around your chest and overlaps the front, then
        roll down the top a time or two to hold it all up). Now I can remove
        all the top layers. When it's cold, my wool beret usually stays on for
        all this. If I was really dirty, I can insert some bathing (i.e. wipe
        downs or tea-cup bath) at each stage. Once I've removed all the wet
        clothes, I'm now in a mostly dry or slightly damp lungi and am covered
        from arm pits to knees (almost). I may tighten up the lungi and wear it
        that way for a while or I can pull a t-shirt on over it all and drop the
        lungi to my waist and retie it. I generally feel the lungi is on more
        securely around my waist than when it's under my arm pits.

        Anyway, the lungi's the easiest and most comfortable thing to wear.

        In Bangladesh, the men do use lungi's to ensure privacy while on the
        toilet (which can be the middle of the field--relief and fertilizing at
        the same time). Women would use their sari's the same way. After
        bathing in a river in the old lungi, men will change into a clean and
        dry lungi by pulling it on over their head and down over the old lungi.
        They can drop the old lungi and tie up the new one without getting the
        new one wet. Women can change saris (rather more complicated) the same way.

        Even though I've done most of my hiking at altitude (2000-4000 m), I've
        lived almost all my life in the sub-tropics: hot and humid. Thin cotton
        dries fast and stays cool.

        CL

        C C Wayah wrote:
        > A kilt would be fine for a man? but not for me
        > Rogene
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Cara Lin Bridgman

        P.O. Box 013 Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
        Longjing Sinjhuang
        Taichung County 434
        Taiwan http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin/
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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