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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re:Beeswax

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  • Mike
    Do any bears besides Winnie eat honey? I watch hunting on TV a lot and bears are usually baited with beaver or other carcasses in some state of putrefaction.
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 28, 2007
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      Do any bears besides Winnie eat honey? I watch hunting on TV a lot and bears
      are usually baited with beaver or other carcasses in some state of
      putrefaction. They are opportunists to the max, and eat whatever is EASILY
      available. I don't think honey is the easiest thing to get in the mind of a
      bear. What's more, the mixture could be stored hanging away from the
      campsite. Bears aren't going to be attracted to it while it's burning.

      On 2/28/07, Jack Rowe <jackrowe@...> wrote:
      >
      > Perhaps only marginally related, waterproof/breathable garments used to
      > be made by soaking cotton material in beeswax, then boiling in water for a
      > while to remove enough of the wax to make the fabric breathe some...
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ian toal
      Eric, I ve done some research on alternatives to wood chips and found that coffee grounds actually burn hotter than wood. Beeswax burns longer than paraffin
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 1 3:21 PM
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        Eric,

        I've done some research on alternatives to wood chips and found that coffee grounds actually burn hotter than wood. Beeswax burns longer than paraffin wax does so between the two I figured I had a good combination.

        I went on a 15 mile back country ski yesterday afternoon and stopped after 7 miles for some food and tea. I brought .6 OZ of my latest batch with me and it boiled 3/4 of a liter of water in 5 minutes. It definitely works well, with minimal soot, using a small surplus army camp stove. The flame lasted another minute or two after the teas was ready, so it was nice to warm my hands a bit. It was above freezing so I was looking over my shoulder a few times hoping not to see anything big and black ambling down the trail.

        I read the other entry about soaking cotton in beeswax for waterproofing. Maybe it's safe to use if that is the case. With what I cook while camping I'm likely to attract bears with that anyway. But if any one else has some input please let me know.

        Enjoy,

        Ian

        ejakes123 <ejakes@...> wrote:
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ian toal <powersurj2002@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm working on making as eco-friendly camping supplies as possible
        and am currently working with used coffee grounds and beeswax to make
        a fire starter/heat source for a small army surplus metal stove. I'm
        trying to get something that will boil tea while I'm using my other
        stove to cook dinner. Of course once I opened up the package of
        beeswax it smelt like honey and started me wondering... Would burning
        beeswax or beeswax candle attract bears?? Does anyone have any
        insight into this one? I'ld like to hear it before the spring...
        >
        > Enjoy,
        >
        > Ian
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > No need to miss a message. Get email on-the-go
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        It's my understanding that beeswax candles do attrack bears. I've
        heard of hunters using them as a lure. Seems kinda risky to me. By
        the way,why coffee grounds?

        Best,
        Eric
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






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      • ian toal
        Ralph, Yeah that is a regretfully good point... I m just not sure if they ld come for the wax, either way I ll switch to something else before spring if I
        Message 3 of 21 , Mar 1 3:25 PM
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          Ralph,

          Yeah that is a regretfully good point...

          I'm just not sure if they'ld come for the wax, either way I'll switch to something else before spring if I can't find out for sure.

          Enjoy,

          Ian

          Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote:
          Of course once I opened up the package of beeswax it smelt like honey and
          started me wondering... Would burning beeswax or beeswax candle attract
          bears?? Does anyone have any insight into this one? I'ld like to hear it
          before the spring...

          Enjoy,

          Ian

          YES !

          If you can smell it, so can a bear, and from a lot further away. :]

          Ralph Oborn

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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        • Jack Rowe
          Well the beeswax clothing is at least of historical interest, if in bear country (which I am) and trying this one I d accept the guilt and use paraffin.
          Message 4 of 21 , Mar 2 10:02 AM
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            Well the beeswax clothing is at least of historical interest, if in bear country (which I am) and trying this one I'd accept the guilt and use paraffin. Old-timers might have considered themselves lucky, shot the bear, dried it and ate it.

            My current thought on this one is trying a similar thing with silicone diluted w/ mineral spirits...put on enough (spray?) to make the fabric very uninterested in water, but not enough to fill pores. I'll report if/when I actually get around to trying it.

            I don't think The Bad Place (W-M, of course) sells much ripstop as I just got 16 yds from their $1/yd table.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Randy
            ... and am currently working with used coffee grounds and beeswax to make a fire starter/heat source for a small army surplus metal stove. I m trying to get
            Message 5 of 21 , Mar 23 9:18 PM
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ian toal <powersurj2002@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm working on making as eco-friendly camping supplies as possible
              and am currently working with used coffee grounds and beeswax to make
              a fire starter/heat source for a small army surplus metal stove. I'm
              trying to get something that will boil tea while I'm using my other
              stove to cook dinner. Of course once I opened up the package of
              beeswax it smelt like honey and started me wondering... Would burning
              beeswax or beeswax candle attract bears?? Does anyone have any
              insight into this one? I'ld like to hear it before the spring...
              >
              > Enjoy,
              >
              > Ian
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > No need to miss a message. Get email on-the-go
              > with Yahoo! Mail for Mobile. Get started.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              What are you currently using as a fire starter now and how are coffee
              grounds and beeswax anymore eco-friendly?

              I think that wood is the most eco-friendly thing you can burn on the
              trail and it's readily available. Burning wood has a net neutral
              effect on C02, it helps clean up the forest floor and helps eliminate
              fire hazards. Why not use it.
              >
            • ian toal
              Hey Randy, I started the post in the winter when it was a little tough to get any wood. I didn t want to use any petroleum based fire starters for a number of
              Message 6 of 21 , Mar 26 2:42 PM
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                Hey Randy,

                I started the post in the winter when it was a little tough to get any wood. I didn't want to use any petroleum based fire starters for a number of reasons, and up till now had been using a camping stove. I was looking for something else. I went with coffee grounds and beeswax because they were a chemical free alternative for the winter. They burn very clean too with hardly any residue and the smoke didn't bother my eyes.

                Now that spring is here, I was just, and I mean 15 minutes ago, trying out a wood burning stove I made using two tin cans. It needs some modifications but if I can get it to boil water then I'll be using it this Spring through Fall. I agree with using downed branches and twigs and certainly love the smell of a nice fire. It's a little tough in the rain though to get them going, I tried once on a morning hike to cook breakfast when it had rained the night before. After two hours I was cold, smoked out and didn't keep down what I had heated up to luke warm and forced myself to eat. It wasn't one of my better trips.

                Thanks for the input and Enjoy,

                Ian

                Randy <randyacton@...> wrote: --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ian toal <powersurj2002@...> wrote:
                >
                > I'm working on making as eco-friendly camping supplies as possible
                and am currently working with used coffee grounds and beeswax to make
                a fire starter/heat source for a small army surplus metal stove. I'm
                trying to get something that will boil tea while I'm using my other
                stove to cook dinner. Of course once I opened up the package of
                beeswax it smelt like honey and started me wondering... Would burning
                beeswax or beeswax candle attract bears?? Does anyone have any
                insight into this one? I'ld like to hear it before the spring...
                >
                > Enjoy,
                >
                > Ian
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > No need to miss a message. Get email on-the-go
                > with Yahoo! Mail for Mobile. Get started.
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                What are you currently using as a fire starter now and how are coffee
                grounds and beeswax anymore eco-friendly?

                I think that wood is the most eco-friendly thing you can burn on the
                trail and it's readily available. Burning wood has a net neutral
                effect on C02, it helps clean up the forest floor and helps eliminate
                fire hazards. Why not use it.
                >






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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Eric Sandberg
                I m curious. How did you make the beeswax/coffee grounds fire starter. Burning for 5 min on .6 oz sounds pretty good to me. Can you give us a recipie?
                Message 7 of 21 , Apr 5, 2007
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                  I'm curious. How did you make the beeswax/coffee grounds fire
                  starter. Burning for 5 min on .6 oz sounds pretty good to me. Can you
                  give us a recipie?
                • hacktorious
                  Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02 NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning wood creates Co2 and is bad for the
                  Message 8 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                    "Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02"

                    NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning
                    wood creates Co2 and is bad for the environment. Do you have a
                    reference for this information? Thanks.
                  • Ralph Oborn
                    ... The idea is that wood in the forest (especially dead downed forest litter) will decompose soon anyway and release most of it s carbon as CO2 into the
                    Message 9 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                      On 4/6/07, hacktorious <hacktorious@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > "Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02"
                      >
                      > NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning
                      > wood creates Co2 and is bad for the environment. Do you have a
                      > reference for this information? Thanks.


                      The idea is that wood in the forest (especially dead downed forest litter)
                      will decompose soon anyway and release most of it's carbon as CO2 into the
                      environment. Unlike fossil fuels that would have stayed intact in the ground
                      from geological times (Hence: fossil fuels).

                      Which is why I am skeptical about the benefit of planting trees to tie up
                      carbon, within a few decades any carbon pulled from the atmosphere will be
                      returned anyway.

                      Ralph Oborn


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Rick
                      Getting off topic, but I learned about the long-term carbon cycle (calcium carbonate or limestone) from Bill Bryson s A History of Nearly Everything . As you
                      Message 10 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                        Getting off topic, but I learned about the long-term carbon cycle
                        (calcium carbonate or limestone) from Bill Bryson's "A History of Nearly
                        Everything". As you know Bryson also wrote Walk in the Woods, in which
                        he suffered because he had not discovered lightweight hiking, of which
                        Hammock Camping is a descendant.

                        Limestone eventually gets subducted into the Earth's magma, and the
                        carbon is released as CO2, but it stays in a tied up form for a LONG
                        time, unlike the carbon in vegetation.

                        Rick

                        Ralph Oborn wrote:
                        > On 4/6/07, hacktorious <hacktorious@...> wrote:
                        >> "Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02"
                        >>
                        >> NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning
                        >> wood creates Co2 and is bad for the environment. Do you have a
                        >> reference for this information? Thanks.
                        >
                        >
                        > The idea is that wood in the forest (especially dead downed forest litter)
                        > will decompose soon anyway and release most of it's carbon as CO2 into the
                        > environment. Unlike fossil fuels that would have stayed intact in the ground
                        > from geological times (Hence: fossil fuels).
                        >
                        > Which is why I am skeptical about the benefit of planting trees to tie up
                        > carbon, within a few decades any carbon pulled from the atmosphere will be
                        > returned anyway.
                        >
                        > Ralph Oborn
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        --
                        Walk Well!

                        Rick (Risk)

                        *********************************
                        http://www.imrisk.com
                        author of
                        A Wildly Successful 200 Mile Hike
                        www.wayahpress.com
                        *********************************
                      • Scott
                        That is an interesting concept, I have never thought of it that way. As far as planting trees, I think it is a good idea because it will help make up for all
                        Message 11 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                          That is an interesting concept, I have never thought of it that way.

                          As far as planting trees, I think it is a good idea because it will help
                          make up for all the loss due to deforestation. This is a tremendous amount
                          of trees. Of course the combination of more trees with the number of
                          existing automobiles could potentially make things worse.

                          --
                          Scott
                          www.AntiFuel.com
                          www.groups.yahoo.com/group/PATC

                          Minds are like parachutes, they only function when they are open.

                          On 4/6/07, Rick <ra1@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Getting off topic, but I learned about the long-term carbon cycle
                          > (calcium carbonate or limestone) from Bill Bryson's "A History of Nearly
                          > Everything". As you know Bryson also wrote Walk in the Woods, in which
                          > he suffered because he had not discovered lightweight hiking, of which
                          > Hammock Camping is a descendant.
                          >
                          > Limestone eventually gets subducted into the Earth's magma, and the
                          > carbon is released as CO2, but it stays in a tied up form for a LONG
                          > time, unlike the carbon in vegetation.
                          >
                          > Rick
                          >
                          > Ralph Oborn wrote:
                          > > On 4/6/07, hacktorious <hacktorious@... <hacktorious%40gmail.com>>
                          > wrote:
                          > >> "Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02"
                          > >>
                          > >> NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning
                          > >> wood creates Co2 and is bad for the environment. Do you have a
                          > >> reference for this information? Thanks.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > The idea is that wood in the forest (especially dead downed forest
                          > litter)
                          > > will decompose soon anyway and release most of it's carbon as CO2 into
                          > the
                          > > environment. Unlike fossil fuels that would have stayed intact in the
                          > ground
                          > > from geological times (Hence: fossil fuels).
                          > >
                          > > Which is why I am skeptical about the benefit of planting trees to tie
                          > up
                          > > carbon, within a few decades any carbon pulled from the atmosphere will
                          > be
                          > > returned anyway.
                          > >
                          > > Ralph Oborn
                          > >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Ralph Oborn
                          ... Nice tie in Rick (With a hangers knot I suppose) Ralph [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Message 12 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                            On 4/6/07, Rick <ra1@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Getting off topic, but I learned about the long-term carbon cycle
                            > (calcium carbonate or limestone) from Bill Bryson's "A History of Nearly
                            > Everything". As you know Bryson also wrote Walk in the Woods, in which
                            > he suffered because he had not discovered lightweight hiking, of which
                            > Hammock Camping is a descendant.
                            >
                            > Limestone eventually gets subducted into the Earth's magma, and the
                            > carbon is released as CO2, but it stays in a tied up form for a LONG
                            > time, unlike the carbon in vegetation.
                            >
                            > Rick


                            Nice tie in Rick (With a hangers knot I suppose)

                            Ralph


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • C C Wayah
                            But trees do convert C02 to carbom and relese 02 in photosynthesis while liveing. So they have a natural conversion process that industry does not. I;ve read
                            Message 13 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                              But trees do convert C02 to carbom and relese 02
                              in photosynthesis while liveing. So they have a natural
                              conversion process that industry does not.

                              I;ve read large cities would quickly litterialy suffocate if it weren';t for
                              the tress with the winds blowing near them from the forested areass around
                              them I'm guessing that the life spoan of a tree out converts the C02 it
                              does releae when it dies.

                              Rogene


                              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Beeswax


                              > That is an interesting concept, I have never thought of it that way.
                              >
                              > As far as planting trees, I think it is a good idea because it will help
                              > make up for all the loss due to deforestation. This is a tremendous
                              > amount
                              > of trees. Of course the combination of more trees with the number of
                              > existing automobiles could potentially make things worse.
                            • Ralph Oborn
                              I;ve read large cities would quickly litterialy suffocate if it weren ;t for the tress with the winds blowing near them from the forested areass around them
                              Message 14 of 21 , Apr 6, 2007
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                                I;ve read large cities would quickly litterialy suffocate if it weren';t for
                                the tress with the winds blowing near them from the forested areass around
                                them I'm guessing that the life spoan of a tree out converts the C02 it
                                does releae when it dies.

                                Rogene


                                Sorry, every bit of CO2 a tree stores as carbohydrates comes out again as it
                                decomposes to CO2, UNLESS it gets buried in a swamp and converted to coal
                                etc.

                                I'm not saying that trees are bad, I'm just saying that they are only a
                                temporary carbon storage device (for a few decades).


                                Ralph

                                Besides we need them to hang hammocks.


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Jack Rowe
                                Much of the carbon tied up in trees goes into the soil s organic matter upon tree s death...soil is now considered to hold more carbon (humus and live biomass)
                                Message 15 of 21 , Apr 7, 2007
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                                  Much of the carbon tied up in trees goes into the soil's organic matter upon tree's death...soil is now considered to hold more carbon (humus and live biomass) than above-ground sources.

                                  re: hammock tree damage, if the same tree were used over and over like a campsite, I think it would suffer greatly. Viva stealth camping!

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Cara Lin Bridgman
                                  ... Burning anything produces CO2, but pound for pound, I assume wood produces less CO2 than fossil fuels. Of the fossil fuels (data from Wright & Nebel 2002.
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Apr 8, 2007
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                                    hacktorious wrote:
                                    > "Burning wood has a net neutral effect on C02"
                                    >
                                    > NET NEUTRAL, that is news to me. Anything I ever read stated burning
                                    > wood creates Co2 and is bad for the environment. Do you have a
                                    > reference for this information? Thanks.


                                    Burning anything produces CO2, but pound for pound, I assume wood
                                    produces less CO2 than fossil fuels. Of the fossil fuels (data from
                                    Wright & Nebel 2002. Environmental Science: Towards a Sustainable
                                    Future), coal is the big baddie. It produces almost twice as much CO2
                                    as natural gas. Gasoline produces about 1.3 times as much as natural gas.

                                    The nice thing about burning wood is that it can be much more efficient
                                    than burning fossil fuels, especially if you're using an efficient wood
                                    burning stove. The problem with all the other sources (alcohol,
                                    canisters, esbit, white gas) is that it takes energy (often
                                    petrochemical) and water to harvest it and to make it. When you're
                                    burning alcohol, there's a net energy loss: harvest, fermentation,
                                    distillation, burning. The distilling, especially, requires lots of
                                    energy. Just think how the revenue officers tracked down stills during
                                    prohibition. For processing esbit and natural gas and white gas, you
                                    have the same problem. We're not burning the stuff exactly as it comes
                                    out of the ground, we have to use energy (usually by burning oil) to
                                    turn it into a usable form. And then there's the packaging and the
                                    energy required to make and recycle it.

                                    Now, the real problem with burning wood is: where did the wood come
                                    from? Folks in Europe recently discovered this problem with their
                                    palm-oil ethanol. Burning ethanol made from palm oil was great for
                                    lowering EU's CO2. The problem was, it was increasing the planet's
                                    atmospheric CO2. This was because Indonesia was (and is) cutting down
                                    (and burning) tropical forest to plant palm trees for palm oil.

                                    So, the point really isn't to plant trees, but to stop deforestation.
                                    There is no way that new plantations of baby trees (or even 40-year-old
                                    plantations of young trees) can capture and hold more CO2 than old
                                    forests. It's not just the CO2 in the trees, it's the CO2 that's been
                                    pumped into the ground as organic matter.

                                    And let's face it, a plantation full of baby trees is no place to hang a
                                    hammock. Baby trees are too bushy and too small. You'll end up
                                    sleeping on the ground. And the ground won't be any good for sleeping
                                    because it won't have that cushiony organic layer.

                                    CL
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