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Re: space blankets/condensation

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  • Jack Rowe
    The space blankets do need an air space to work, any part you weren t actually touching would work but not areas making contact...I didn t know how crumbly
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 23, 2007
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      The space blankets do need an air space to work, any part you weren't actually touching would work but not areas making contact...I didn't know how crumbly they are, light enough to carry 2+ but no fun making a lot of trash in the woods. If using as a vapor barrier it'd be inside insulation, but it would be a crumbly vapor barrier and anyway needs the air space to function best.

      Next time I try it the blanket will be fixed to the underside of my over-tarp. IR reflectors are certainly very effective with a campfire, even using dull-finished logs and rocks.

      Jack, NE New Mexico US 7,000 ft

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • chcoa
      I m jumping in a little late on this one but I have used my space blanket (bivy sack style) several times for extra warmth with fairly good results. I have
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 15 11:25 PM
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        I'm jumping in a little late on this one but I have used my space
        blanket (bivy sack style) several times for extra warmth with fairly
        good results. I have used it between my clothed body and my CCF pad
        and under the hammock when testing the HH Supershelter, and I've
        used as it was ment, as a bivy where I was inside the blanket then
        inside my sleeping bag.

        Between me and the CCF results in moisture build up and although it
        did help a little I woke up a damp backside.

        Under me in the HH Supershelter, I didn't notice a difference.

        Me inside the blanket inside my sleeping bag added at least 5 to 8
        degrees of warmth. I was able to use a 45 F bag in 38 F weather.
        My outer layer of clothes were a little damp in the morning though.

        The bivy sack has vents at the feet so that helps a little when
        lying inside the bag.

        Jamie in AZ

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Rowe" <jackrowe@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > The space blankets do need an air space to work, any part you
        weren't actually touching would work but not areas making
        contact...I didn't know how crumbly they are, light enough to carry
        2+ but no fun making a lot of trash in the woods. If using as a
        vapor barrier it'd be inside insulation, but it would be a crumbly
        vapor barrier and anyway needs the air space to function best.
        >
        > Next time I try it the blanket will be fixed to the underside of
        my over-tarp. IR reflectors are certainly very effective with a
        campfire, even using dull-finished logs and rocks.
        >
        > Jack, NE New Mexico US 7,000 ft
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • chrispbbb
        I live in Canada and have camped in my hammock down to 0F / -20C. I have a Hennessy Hammock with the SuperShelter. My sleeping bag is a rectangular
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 16 3:38 PM
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          I live in Canada and have camped in my hammock down to 0F / -20C. I
          have a Hennessy Hammock with the SuperShelter.
          My sleeping bag is a rectangular side-zipper type rated for 32F. I
          wear a synthetic base layer and fleece top and pants.
          However, the biggest difference I find for warmth is how I use a
          space (reflective) blanket. I have made a top and pants out of the
          material that I wear between the base layer and the fleece layer.
          The space blanket both reflects back radiant heat loss and acts as a
          vapour barrier. The vapour barrier part is important to minimize
          body moisture loss (i.e. dehydration) in sub-zero temperatures.
          With the space blanket layer I am toasty warm all night, without I
          would freeze.
          There is condensation buildup under the space blanket, but thanks to
          the base layer it is wicked over your body and does not become
          uncomfortable.
          The only downside I find is the crinkly noise made but this is
          muffled under the fleece layer and inside the sleeping bag.

          The important thing about using a space blanket is that it must be
          close to your body with a small air gap (i.e. base layer). Otherwise
          it is ineffective at reflecting back the radiant heat loss.

          Cheers,
          Chris


          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm jumping in a little late on this one but I have used my space
          > blanket (bivy sack style) several times for extra warmth with
          fairly
          > good results. I have used it between my clothed body and my CCF
          pad
          > and under the hammock when testing the HH Supershelter, and I've
          > used as it was ment, as a bivy where I was inside the blanket then
          > inside my sleeping bag.
          >
          > Between me and the CCF results in moisture build up and although it
          > did help a little I woke up a damp backside.
          >
          > Under me in the HH Supershelter, I didn't notice a difference.
          >
          > Me inside the blanket inside my sleeping bag added at least 5 to 8
          > degrees of warmth. I was able to use a 45 F bag in 38 F weather.
          > My outer layer of clothes were a little damp in the morning though.
          >
          > The bivy sack has vents at the feet so that helps a little when
          > lying inside the bag.
          >
          > Jamie in AZ
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Rowe" <jackrowe@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > The space blankets do need an air space to work, any part you
          > weren't actually touching would work but not areas making
          > contact...I didn't know how crumbly they are, light enough to carry
          > 2+ but no fun making a lot of trash in the woods. If using as a
          > vapor barrier it'd be inside insulation, but it would be a crumbly
          > vapor barrier and anyway needs the air space to function best.
          > >
          > > Next time I try it the blanket will be fixed to the underside of
          > my over-tarp. IR reflectors are certainly very effective with a
          > campfire, even using dull-finished logs and rocks.
          > >
          > > Jack, NE New Mexico US 7,000 ft
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
        • robbstanek
          I recently used one of the Adeventure Medical Bivy Sack style space blankets in my HH with the under-cover with good success. It kept my bottom side nice and
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 17 8:49 AM
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            I recently used one of the Adeventure Medical Bivy Sack style space
            blankets in my HH with the under-cover with good success. It kept my
            bottom side nice and warm throughout the night. This was in the 30's
            with a 20 deg down bag and some clothing on.


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm jumping in a little late on this one but I have used my space
            > blanket (bivy sack style) several times for extra warmth with
            fairly
            > good results. I have used it between my clothed body and my CCF
            pad
            > and under the hammock when testing the HH Supershelter, and I've
            > used as it was ment, as a bivy where I was inside the blanket then
            > inside my sleeping bag.
            >
            > Between me and the CCF results in moisture build up and although it
            > did help a little I woke up a damp backside.
            >
            > Under me in the HH Supershelter, I didn't notice a difference.
            >
            > Me inside the blanket inside my sleeping bag added at least 5 to 8
            > degrees of warmth. I was able to use a 45 F bag in 38 F weather.
            > My outer layer of clothes were a little damp in the morning though.
            >
            > The bivy sack has vents at the feet so that helps a little when
            > lying inside the bag.
            >
            > Jamie in AZ
            >
            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Rowe" <jackrowe@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > The space blankets do need an air space to work, any part you
            > weren't actually touching would work but not areas making
            > contact...I didn't know how crumbly they are, light enough to carry
            > 2+ but no fun making a lot of trash in the woods. If using as a
            > vapor barrier it'd be inside insulation, but it would be a crumbly
            > vapor barrier and anyway needs the air space to function best.
            > >
            > > Next time I try it the blanket will be fixed to the underside of
            > my over-tarp. IR reflectors are certainly very effective with a
            > campfire, even using dull-finished logs and rocks.
            > >
            > > Jack, NE New Mexico US 7,000 ft
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
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