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Breaking Strength of Rope vs Webbing

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  • sultzmd
    If the forces on my Hennessey Spectra cord approach 1400 lbs (depending on how its hung), how can one replace the cord with webbing- like Ed Speers- that s
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 6, 2007
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      If the forces on my Hennessey Spectra cord approach 1400 lbs
      (depending on how its hung), how can one replace the cord with
      webbing- like Ed Speers- that's only rated for 700 lbs or some hammock
      hangers using straps rated for 250 lbs?
    • Paul Kaercher
      I made a 9 long (fabric length) hammock out of 8 mm silk, whipped ends, tie out lines of 5/32 Yale Cordage-Pluse Line, and a ridge line of 1/16 Pulse Line. I
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 6, 2007
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        I made a 9' long (fabric length) hammock out of 8 mm silk, whipped
        ends, tie out lines of 5/32 Yale Cordage-Pluse Line, and a ridge line
        of 1/16" Pulse Line.
        I weigh about 175 lb. and have spent between 20 & 25 nights with
        no durability problems.

        I recently made a 10' long silk hammock using tie out lines 1/8" Pulse Line.
        I tested it in the back yard for 2 nights. The 3ed night out was at the
        start of a 5 day trip, hiking the GA loop. Around midnight I heard a pop
        and then over the next few hours there were several more pops.
        At 4:30 AM the hammock failed completely and I was on the ground.
        Fortunately I was following my 2 rules of hammock hanging:
        Don't hang higher than you care to fall, and don't hang over anything
        you don't mind landing on.

        So why the failure? The silk ripped just in front of the tie out line attachment
        point. I suspect that the smaller diameter tie out line (as compared to my 1st
        hammock) put enough stress on the silk fibers to cause them to fail.

        Since only a small piece of the hammock tore off, I rebuilt the hammock.
        I took the torn piece of the silk and used it as padding for the
        tie out lines. I cut a 1" by about 6" of silk and wrapped it around the
        end of the hammock next to the whipping.
        I attached the tie out lines on top of the silk wrappings.
        The silk wrapping spreads the force from the tie out lines
        over a greater area of the hammock end, and hopefully this will prevent
        future 4 AM surprises. I only have 3 nights in the repaired hammock so I
        don't know how well my silk wrapping works in the long run.

        If you try the wrapping on your own hammock, and you whip the ends,
        I would advise against using a slippery material like sil-nylon, for fear that
        the tie out line may slide off.

        I have bought 10 mm silk for my next hammock. Yes it's a little heavier
        but the extra strength will (I hope) be worth it in the long run.

        Paul
      • Keith YOung
        Being a big guy, I make sure my hammock is hung with about a 30 deg sag. I also bought motorcycle tie-down straps from Lowe s, rated 675 lb. test strength,
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 6, 2007
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          Being a big guy, I make sure my hammock is hung with about a 30 deg sag. I also bought motorcycle tie-down straps from Lowe's, rated 675 lb. test strength, and 2000 lbs. bursting strength. I remember that Campmort has strapping that they sell by the foot, rated at 2000, 3000 & 4000 lbs. This should be enough.


          sultzmd <sultzmd@...> wrote:
          If the forces on my Hennessey Spectra cord approach 1400 lbs
          (depending on how its hung), how can one replace the cord with
          webbing- like Ed Speers- that's only rated for 700 lbs or some hammock
          hangers using straps rated for 250 lbs?






          "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
          arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body – but rather
          to skid in sideways, barely in time, a chunk of chocolate in one hand, a nearly-empty bottle of 15-year old single-malt scotch in the other, body thoroughly used up but still erect and dribbling, dirty, totally worn out and screaming – WOOHOO, what a ride!"

          Keith Young, Ph.D. (retired)
          Philadelphia, PA
          Riding a 2004 Suzuki Burgman 650
          named The DEMON DUCK of DOOM
          Swinging a TreckLight hammock, and
          being a DINK-on-FIRE.

          ---------------------------------
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