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Re: [Hammock Camping] Hammock Failures

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  • teblum@verizon.net
    You don t specifically say that you hemmed the fabric all the way around. If you didn t, that would be the likely cause of failure. Tom
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 5, 2007
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      You don't specifically say that you hemmed the fabric all the way around.

      If you didn't, that would be the likely cause of failure.

      Tom
    • Dave Womble
      Bill, Like Tim I would need more hints than you gave and would also be suspicious of whether or not your fabric was just not strong enough to hold you. I
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 5, 2007
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        Bill,

        Like Tim I would need more hints than you gave and would also be
        suspicious of whether or not your fabric was just not strong enough
        to hold you. I assume your 1.8 oz ripstop is the more familiar 1.9
        oz ripstop nylon with DWR and I would think it would be as durable,
        if not more, than what I think a travel hammock is. What I recall as
        a travel hammock uses lots of small cords on each end of the
        hammock. I haven't had experience with hammock failures like you are
        having, but I inspect them and look for problem areas from time to
        time and have retired ropes and hammocks that looked troublesome
        before they failed. I would have thought you would have noticed
        problems or problem areas before, or as they totally failed, and had
        some idea as to what the cause was.

        Pardon this as I am an old engineer and I have learned that sometimes
        people don't understand fundamental concepts as well as they think
        they do. And sometimes I bring up things that I question whether
        people have overlooked and they haven't. In regards to failures,
        when materials are stressed and they survive a test at a certain
        stress level, it doesn't mean they can survive that same stress over
        and over again. Actually, the closer the stress was at the test
        level to the maximum that material could survive in its new and
        unused state, the more likely it will fail at repeated tests at that
        same test level. Climbing ropes, parachutes, etc are usually
        monitored and retired after so many usages because of this and in
        labs where materials are stress tested the samples that are tested
        are routinely retired and not used for anything else. Lightweight
        backpacking hammocks are not made out of materials that are strong
        enough to last a lifetime of heavy use, they need to be treated as if
        they are vulnerable to pokes and punctures when they are weighted by
        an occupant and that ropes and straps can be damaged by sharp bends
        and edges. They need to be inspected and repaired or replaced as
        necessary... when you see something that looks like it is weakening,
        pay attention to it because that usually indicates that a failure is
        likely to occur at that spot with repeated usage. In all of the
        hammock failures I recall hearing about, the person involved was able
        to walk away with only their dignity somewhat damaged, but there is a
        serious risk when a hammock fails so please inspect your hammocks and
        keep them in good working condition. Using hammocks until they fail
        is a risk that folks should be discouraged from doing, I know that Ed
        Speer and Karn have done that but it was a risk they knowingly took
        to learn more about the useful live off the hammocks Ed manufacturers.

        Dave

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > only possibilities i can think of are that maybe even the 1st two
        fabrics were even thinner, lighter fabrics than you thought.
        > the 1.2 is pushing it for sure if you just used one layer.
        > maybe you were unfortunate enough to get fabrics that had weak
        spots from when they were made. that is puzzling.
        > do you raise up on your elbows when getting out or moving around
        in the hammock?
        > also, what is your weight?
        >
        > Bill Thomas <hamish54@...> wrote:
        > Thank you to all of the good ideas & info from the groups
        members.
        >
        > I need ideas on possible failure causes of 3 hammocks I made. The
        first
        > one was made of 1.8 oz ripstop, second a Wally World $1/yd
        polyester
        > muslin, and 3rd was of 1.2 ripstop nylon. All were based on Speer's
        > design except instead of knotting the ends, they were gathered and
        > frapped to form a loop as the HH hammocks are. The spectra
        suspension
        > cord was tied to the loop. All of the failures were at the foot end
        of
        > the hammocks from 10" to 2' from the end. What's puzzling is that
        the
        > most use any of them had was about 10 nights, they weren't left
        exposed
        > to the sum, and I always remove my shoes before laying down. They
        were
        > stored in snakeskins inside. Currently I'm using a travel hammock
        with
        > no problems but would like to resolve my failure problems to make
        my
        > own.
        >
        > Bill T.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
        > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • gordon_human
        Give that the failure was near the foot end, I wonder if you are pushing yourself up the hammock length, using your your feet, each time you move around - the
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 5, 2007
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          Give that the failure was near the foot end, I wonder if you are
          pushing yourself up the hammock length, using your your feet, each
          time you move around - the whole inert mass of your body is
          transferred through your heels to a relatively small fabric area as
          you push to overcome the friction and move yourself....

          Just a thought.....

          Gordon
        • Bill Thomas
          Thanks for the suggestions. BTW I weigh 175#. Very well it may be that I ve been pushing off with my sock heels to move up in the hammock that may have
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 5, 2007
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            Thanks for the suggestions.

            BTW I weigh 175#. Very well it may be that I've been pushing off
            with my sock heels to move up in the hammock that may have
            overstessed the fabric. Curriously, two of the failures occured on
            first night on the trail, first on the Quachita then on the Colorado
            trail. So, I just converted to being a ground sleeper with my K-mart
            blue pad and continued on. What was puzzling was what that the
            failures occured with low usage <10 nights. Probably, I just need to
            stick with a heavier material.

            Bill Thomas

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > only possibilities i can think of are that maybe even the 1st two
            fabrics were even thinner, lighter fabrics than you thought.
            > the 1.2 is pushing it for sure if you just used one layer.
            > maybe you were unfortunate enough to get fabrics that had weak
            spots from when they were made. that is puzzling.
            > do you raise up on your elbows when getting out or moving around
            in the hammock?
            > also, what is your weight?
            >
            > Bill Thomas <hamish54@...> wrote:
            > Thank you to all of the good ideas & info from the groups
            members.
            >
            > I need ideas on possible failure causes of 3 hammocks I made. The
            first
            > one was made of 1.8 oz ripstop, second a Wally World $1/yd
            polyester
            > muslin, and 3rd was of 1.2 ripstop nylon. All were based on
            Speer's
            > design except instead of knotting the ends, they were gathered and
            > frapped to form a loop as the HH hammocks are. The spectra
            suspension
            > cord was tied to the loop. All of the failures were at the foot
            end of
            > the hammocks from 10" to 2' from the end. What's puzzling is that
            the
            > most use any of them had was about 10 nights, they weren't left
            exposed
            > to the sum, and I always remove my shoes before laying down. They
            were
            > stored in snakeskins inside. Currently I'm using a travel hammock
            with
            > no problems but would like to resolve my failure problems to make
            my
            > own.
            >
            > Bill T.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
            > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Ralph Oborn
            If pushing off might be the problem, hang the foot end a little higher might fix it, and make the hammock a little longer. Ralph ... [Non-text portions of this
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 5, 2007
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              If pushing off might be the problem, hang the foot end a little higher might
              fix it, and make the hammock a little longer.

              Ralph


              On 2/5/07, Bill Thomas <hamish54@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks for the suggestions.
              >
              > BTW I weigh 175#. Very well it may be that I've been pushing off
              > with my sock heels to move up in the hammock that may have
              > overstessed the fabric. Curriously, two of the failures occured on
              > first night on the trail, first on the Quachita then on the Colorado
              > trail. So, I just converted to being a ground sleeper with my K-mart
              > blue pad and continued on. What was puzzling was what that the
              > failures occured with low usage <10 nights. Probably, I just need to
              > stick with a heavier material.
              >
              > Bill Thomas
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > only possibilities i can think of are that maybe even the 1st two
              > fabrics were even thinner, lighter fabrics than you thought.
              > > the 1.2 is pushing it for sure if you just used one layer.
              > > maybe you were unfortunate enough to get fabrics that had weak
              > spots from when they were made. that is puzzling.
              > > do you raise up on your elbows when getting out or moving around
              > in the hammock?
              > > also, what is your weight?
              > >
              > > Bill Thomas <hamish54@...> wrote:
              > > Thank you to all of the good ideas & info from the groups
              > members.
              > >
              > > I need ideas on possible failure causes of 3 hammocks I made. The
              > first
              > > one was made of 1.8 oz ripstop, second a Wally World $1/yd
              > polyester
              > > muslin, and 3rd was of 1.2 ripstop nylon. All were based on
              > Speer's
              > > design except instead of knotting the ends, they were gathered and
              > > frapped to form a loop as the HH hammocks are. The spectra
              > suspension
              > > cord was tied to the loop. All of the failures were at the foot
              > end of
              > > the hammocks from 10" to 2' from the end. What's puzzling is that
              > the
              > > most use any of them had was about 10 nights, they weren't left
              > exposed
              > > to the sum, and I always remove my shoes before laying down. They
              > were
              > > stored in snakeskins inside. Currently I'm using a travel hammock
              > with
              > > no problems but would like to resolve my failure problems to make
              > my
              > > own.
              > >
              > > Bill T.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > Bored stiff? Loosen up...
              > > Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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