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Motorcycle as 1 hammock post?

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  • tory1942
    Anyone know of people (or photos/drawings) of a motorcycle or motor scooter, set up on it s side stand, as one point of a hammock setup. Yeah, I realize the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 26, 2007
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      Anyone know of people (or photos/drawings) of a motorcycle or motor
      scooter, set up on it's side stand, as one point of a hammock setup.
      Yeah, I realize the side stand has to be on a plate, crushed can or
      similar, to keep it from digging in to non-asphalt ground. For a light-
      to-midweight bike, maybe the rig would have to have some props or
      supports on the side-stand side, to keep the machine from toppling over
      (Murphy's Law: no warning, in the wee hours, during a rain storm).
      This would be useful in a "stealth camp" mode, if a camo tarp were
      thrown over the bike.

      Anyone have practical experience/advice here?

      The Very Tall Man, 6' 8", 64 y/o
      Riding a Suzuki Burgman 650
      "It frosts my butt to pay $70 for a room,
      dead-tired on the road, and then get a
      standard double bed."
    • Ralph Oborn
      Anyone have practical experience/advice here? Here we go again... :] A quick an dirty test.... 1. Set up your scooter 2. Tie a rope to the top 3. Pull as hard
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 26, 2007
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        Anyone have practical experience/advice here?

        Here we go again... :]


        A quick an dirty test....

        1. Set up your scooter
        2. Tie a rope to the top
        3. Pull as hard as you can horizontily
        4. If the sccoter tips it will tip as soon as you get in your hammock
        5. If th scooter drags, it will drag as soon as you get in the hammock


        Just to validate the test.

        1. Set up one side of your hammock to a tree or solid post
        2. Have as large a person as you can find climb in the hammock
        3. Grab the other hammock strap ant pull outwards (say at a 30° angle)
        4. Try to lift that person up. That is the same tension that will be
        pulling your scooter over.


        You could brace and stake down th back side of the bike, but a Risk one or
        two stake option might be easier.


        Ralph


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Keith YOung
        Thanks, Ralph. I d thought to do that, but not in 20 deg. F. weather. Freezing my cojones off in a small city backyard, at night, in a hammock,
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 27, 2007
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          Thanks, Ralph. I'd thought to do that, but not in 20 deg. F. weather. Freezing my cojones off in a small city backyard, at night, in a hammock, experimenting with pulling my scooter over, is not my idea of fun. I'll wait to this mid-spring, I suppose, and report back here.

          Keith Young
          64 y/o, retired
          Philadelphia, PA, USA
          2004 Burgman AN650

          Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote:
          Anyone have practical experience/advice here?

          Here we go again... :]

          A quick an dirty test....

          1. Set up your scooter
          2. Tie a rope to the top
          3. Pull as hard as you can horizontily
          4. If the sccoter tips it will tip as soon as you get in your hammock
          5. If th scooter drags, it will drag as soon as you get in the hammock

          Just to validate the test.

          1. Set up one side of your hammock to a tree or solid post
          2. Have as large a person as you can find climb in the hammock
          3. Grab the other hammock strap ant pull outwards (say at a 30° angle)
          4. Try to lift that person up. That is the same tension that will be
          pulling your scooter over.

          You could brace and stake down th back side of the bike, but a Risk one or
          two stake option might be easier.

          Ralph

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          ---------------------------------
          Access over 1 million songs - Yahoo! Music Unlimited.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ralph Oborn
          Freezing my cojones off in a small city backyard, at night, in a hammock, experimenting with pulling my scooter over, is not my idea of fun. I ll wait to
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 27, 2007
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            Freezing my cojones off in a small city backyard, at night, in a hammock,
            experimenting with pulling my scooter over, is not my idea of fun. I'll
            wait to this mid-spring, I suppose, and report back here.

            Wimp!! :] I was out taking environmental well samples, this morning. 10°.


            Ralph


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Rick
            A Risk? You mean the unsupported pole? I had not seen it called a Risk. LOL! http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/singlepolehammock.htm Risk ... -- Walk Well! Rick
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 28, 2007
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              A Risk?

              You mean the unsupported pole? I had not seen it called a Risk. LOL!

              http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/singlepolehammock.htm

              Risk

              Ralph Oborn wrote:
              > Anyone have practical experience/advice here?
              >
              > Here we go again... :]
              >
              >
              > A quick an dirty test....
              >
              > 1. Set up your scooter
              > 2. Tie a rope to the top
              > 3. Pull as hard as you can horizontily
              > 4. If the sccoter tips it will tip as soon as you get in your hammock
              > 5. If th scooter drags, it will drag as soon as you get in the hammock
              >
              >
              > Just to validate the test.
              >
              > 1. Set up one side of your hammock to a tree or solid post
              > 2. Have as large a person as you can find climb in the hammock
              > 3. Grab the other hammock strap ant pull outwards (say at a 30° angle)
              > 4. Try to lift that person up. That is the same tension that will be
              > pulling your scooter over.
              >
              >
              > You could brace and stake down th back side of the bike, but a Risk one or
              > two stake option might be easier.
              >
              >
              > Ralph
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

              --
              Walk Well!

              Rick (Risk)

              *********************************
              http://www.imrisk.com
              author of
              A Wildly Successful 200 Mile Hike
              www.wayahpress.com
              *********************************
            • Keith YOung
              Actually, following up what the people commenting have said, I d thought to alter the scooter support point. Folks said I d probably bend the side-stand with
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 28, 2007
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                Actually, following up what the people commenting have said, I'd thought to alter the scooter support point. Folks said I'd probably bend the side-stand with over-turning forces.

                I'm now assuming the scooter is up on its center stand, with a 'plate' under the weight-bearing surfaces. I now imagine the support of a hammock from 2 poles on either side of the scooter, lashed together at the top & at the rail sides (suitably padded to preserve the paint), & restrained at the bottom with a loose strap passed around the pole bottoms & thru the rear wheel tire rim opening. Perhaps another line from the lashing back to the handlebars. The hammock would be swung off the rear of the scooter.

                I'll get the scooter out and do the needed experiments during a warm spell or wait for spring weather. It's either that or have my "Dear Wife" duct-tape me to the bed, as she has no interest in frozen cojones.

                This would make for a rather "lengthy" camp, what with 8' for the scooter & 12' for the hammock = ~ 20'.

                I do continue to agree with the ultra-light philosophy (even if the scooter will carry the extra stuff), and will be looking into minimizing weight, once I prove (or disprove) the concept.

                I do admit that one seemingly intractable problem remains, which is the "other" pole in back, which is to be tied down to the ubiquitous "tree" that just happens to be in the right place, each time. Good luck finding it on (or just off) the asphalt road in West Texas, New Mexico or Southeast California ... or a commercial campground most anywhere in the USA.

                Keith Young, retired
                64-year old guy, 6' 8"
                TreckLight double-width hammock
                2004 Suzuki Burgman AN650

                Rick <ra1@...> wrote:
                A Risk?

                You mean the unsupported pole? I had not seen it called a Risk. LOL!

                http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/singlepolehammock.htm

                Risk

                Ralph Oborn wrote:
                > Anyone have practical experience/advice here?
                >
                > Here we go again... :]
                >
                >
                > A quick an dirty test....
                >
                > 1. Set up your scooter
                > 2. Tie a rope to the top
                > 3. Pull as hard as you can horizontily
                > 4. If the sccoter tips it will tip as soon as you get in your hammock
                > 5. If th scooter drags, it will drag as soon as you get in the hammock
                >
                >
                > Just to validate the test.
                >
                > 1. Set up one side of your hammock to a tree or solid post
                > 2. Have as large a person as you can find climb in the hammock
                > 3. Grab the other hammock strap ant pull outwards (say at a 30° angle)
                > 4. Try to lift that person up. That is the same tension that will be
                > pulling your scooter over.
                >
                >
                > You could brace and stake down th back side of the bike, but a Risk one or
                > two stake option might be easier.
                >
                >
                > Ralph
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                --
                Walk Well!

                Rick (Risk)

                *********************************
                http://www.imrisk.com
                author of
                A Wildly Successful 200 Mile Hike
                www.wayahpress.com
                *********************************





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