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Re: Very tall man

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  • natesdenn71
    My hammock came with 6mm climbing rope. This has worked great! I also bought two sections of 1/2 inch tubular webbing each 12ft. long from a climbing shop to
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 6, 2007
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      My hammock came with 6mm climbing rope. This has worked great! I
      also bought two sections of 1/2 inch tubular webbing each 12ft. long
      from a climbing shop to use a tree straps. I went with a lot of
      webbing to make sure I could tie up on MOST trees. I have pics of my
      set up on the group page under "Nates Hammock" I am also a big guy at
      6'2" 280lbs. My system has not shown any signs of failing (yet)!!
      Good luck!
    • Sandy Kramer
      i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half) ... and bought some 100-lb. test
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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        i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of
        rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half)


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Keith YOung <tory1942@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears,
        and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope,
        and burned the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling
        this rope on each end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than
        enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8").
        Seems to work. I use the carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-
        hook on the end of the hammock.
        >
        >
      • Keith YOung
        Hi, Sandy, I bought a 50 package of 100# test polypropylene soft rope from Sears, then cut that length in half, seal/melting the ends with a flame. However,
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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          Hi, Sandy,

          I bought a 50' package of 100# test polypropylene soft rope from Sears, then cut that length in half, seal/melting the ends with a flame.

          However, look at the other posts on the topic of "very tall man." It seems that the strains on the lines is much more than I'd anticipated. Handing a hammock (indoors) with a sag of about 30 deg. seems best, but the strains on EACH rope are at least equal to my weight (a bit less than 300 lbs. -- which is in proportion to my height at 6' 8"). Figure out the strtains, based on your own weight. Look up Youngblood's chart, at the files part of this Yahoo Club.

          I've doubled each rope, but am now looking at woven polyester strapping tape (possibly tubular), "MuleTape" or climber's rope, with a test strength of about 800 to 1200 lbs. range.

          I don't have to pay quite so much attention to ultralight philosophy, since I'll be on my motor scooter (but, at 650cc's, it's a "fire-breathing, wolf-in-sheep's-clothing" scooter), and it will carry the weight for me. If the temperature drops down close to 50 deg F., it's a motel for sure.

          Since I'm inside, and in the spare upstairs bedroom this winter, I've drilled out holes in 90-year-old red oak studs, put in screw-eyes with a twist bar and also placed a bunch of cushions and pillows under me, until I get this right.

          Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@...> wrote:

          i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of
          rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half)

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Keith YOung <tory1942@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears,
          and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope,
          and burned the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling
          this rope on each end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than
          enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8").
          Seems to work. I use the carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-
          hook on the end of the hammock.
          >
          >





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        • terry_and_pearl
          Polyester webbing works really great. Very little to no stretch and doesn t abrade or absorb water like nylon. Don t get the real thick stuff. Also, the
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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            Polyester webbing works really great. Very little to no stretch and
            doesn't abrade or absorb water like nylon. Don't get the real thick
            stuff. Also, the polyester webbing works as your tree hugger as well
            as the suspension. Form the webbing into a giant loop and girth hitch
            to the tree with the free end hooked into the carabiner and then
            tighten with a double ring buckle. In this manner you will have 2
            lengths of webbing suspending the hammock from the tree, each with
            half the load.

            A double ring buckle works very good. As good as a cam buckle to
            tighten. A little trickier to loosen, but once you learn the trick it
            is easy and simple to loosen also. Also, the double ring buckle will
            be a lot stronger than the cam buckle and won't have any abrasive
            effect on the webbing like a cam buckle could.

            I use 1,000 lb, 1" polyester webbing. These from Harbor Frieght:

            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40063

            work really great. Cut off the cam buckle and sew another loop in its
            place with 2 rings in the loop.

            I use the SMC descending rings. They're AL with a very high rated
            capacity, light and cheap (about $2.50 each, you will need 4):

            http://www.smcgear.net/products.asp?cat=5&pid=44

            Using these, a double ring buckle will weigh only about 0.8 oz - good
            even for those that watch their weight and the webbing is very light also.
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