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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Very tall man

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  • Keith YOung
    Along with the TreckLight hammock (now strung in my spare upstairs bedroom), I bought two of the carabiners. They were as advertised, light and strong. I
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 4, 2007
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      Along with the TreckLight hammock (now strung in my spare upstairs bedroom), I bought two of the carabiners. They were as advertised, light and strong. I expect to use them next mid-spring thru mid-fall, on my motor scooter trips (when the motel doesn't beckon too hard, that is).

      I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope, and burned the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling this rope on each end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8"). Seems to work. I use the carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-hook on the end of the hammock.

      David Elliott <delliott78@...> wrote:
      Hey. I looked at the Treklight site, and what looked interesting was the
      lightweight carabiners (lighter and cheaper than climbing carabiners, but
      stronger than cheap "mini-biners"). Does anyone know if they are as
      advertised? I use spectra line and learned once that a bowline will snug
      down so tight with that slippery stuff that it takes a leatherman to untie
      it. Since then I've discovered that I can use hollow-braided line with
      adjustable splices. It makes for very easy set-up and take-down if I use
      carabiners to connect the spectra loops to tree-huggers. I'm looking for a
      good source for medium-weight, medium strength, medium priced carabiners.

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    • Ralph Oborn
      I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope, and burned the ends to
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 4, 2007
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        I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and
        bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope, and burned
        the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling this rope on each
        end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than enough to cover my near
        300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8"). Seems to work. I use the
        carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-hook on the end of the hammock.




        Keith, the way the trig works for the common angles of hanging the amount of
        tension on the rope is actually many times your weight. Even doubled up you
        are barely operating within the ropes safety margin.
        Both Yongblood and I put posted a spreadsheet to help you calculate actual
        tension.
        Also remember your weight is a static load, When getting in or out the
        forces are momentarily much higher.

        At a 30° sag angle the tension on EACH rope works out to be your weight!!!!

        At lower sag angles (tighter hammock) it will be much higher.

        Ralph


        PS YMMV hang low over soft ground


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Shane Steinkamp
        ... that I m ... Hey! Who let the little guy in? Oh, and Ralph is right. Get better rope. Shane
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 4, 2007
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          > lb. strength, more than enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering
          that I'm
          > 6' 8").

          Hey! Who let the little guy in?

          Oh, and Ralph is right.

          Get better rope.

          Shane
        • Keith YOung
          Many thanks. I ll re-rig with higher test-strength lines, particularly for my weight. My doctor says I have to get my Body Mass Index down to the median value
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 4, 2007
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            Many thanks. I'll re-rig with higher test-strength lines, particularly for my weight.

            My doctor says I have to get my Body Mass Index down to the median value ... which is about 200 lbs. I haven't weighed that since entering high school, in 1957 ... at which time (looking at old photos) I looked like a McDonald's straw that swallowed a large marble.

            Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote:
            I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and
            bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope, and burned
            the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling this rope on each
            end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than enough to cover my near
            300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8"). Seems to work. I use the
            carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-hook on the end of the hammock.

            Keith, the way the trig works for the common angles of hanging the amount of
            tension on the rope is actually many times your weight. Even doubled up you
            are barely operating within the ropes safety margin.
            Both Yongblood and I put posted a spreadsheet to help you calculate actual
            tension.
            Also remember your weight is a static load, When getting in or out the
            forces are momentarily much higher.

            At a 30° sag angle the tension on EACH rope works out to be your weight!!!!

            At lower sag angles (tighter hammock) it will be much higher.

            Ralph

            PS YMMV hang low over soft ground

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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          • CC Wayah
            Very tall Man, Since weight isn t that much of an issue for your motorscooter, I d go to an outfitter and buy CLIMBING roped/webbing. It s a bit heavy but is
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 5, 2007
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              Very tall Man,
              Since weight isn't that much of an issue
              for your motorscooter,
              I'd go to an outfitter and buy CLIMBING
              roped/webbing. It's a bit heavy but is designed to be fail safe. Some test
              out at a 700 to 1,000 pounds. They also are designed not to stretch. But you
              will have to ask them which rope you need for your hammock hanging purposes.

              CCwayah
            • Brian Neeley
              Ralph Oborn wrote: I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and bought some
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 5, 2007
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                Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote: I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears, and
                bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope,
                <snip>

                I figured that doubling this rope on each
                end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than enough to cover my near
                300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8"). Seems to work. I use the
                carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-hook on the end of the hammock.




                .On

                One other thing to consider, ANY knot (or more specifically, bend) that you put in your rope will reduce its strength. A good old square knot reduces the breaking strength by HALF. A clove hitch is much better, reducing the strength by (I forget exactly), say 10 - 20%. Splices are great, only reducing strength by about 5%. But splices aren't easy, and they are permanent (but maybe that is what you want...).
                Basically, any time you bend your rope double, you halve your strength.
                So, like someone else said, buy harness strapping. That should be plenty strong enough; and then it's a simple matter to use some of the clips or buckles some people love so much.
                Sorry, I don't know anything about those buckles, I've never used 'em. I haven't even tied my hammock up since early in the spring :(.

                Brian



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              • David Elliott
                If you use hollow-braid rope, splices are easily adjustable. They re also the easiest splices to make - you re just doubling the end back and running it
                Message 7 of 15 , Jan 6, 2007
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                  If you use hollow-braid rope, splices are easily adjustable. They're also
                  the easiest splices to make - you're just doubling the end back and running
                  it through the center cavity of the rope for 6 inches or so and back out
                  again. When there's tension on the splice it doesn't budge (like a Chinese
                  finger trap), but when you take the tension off you can slide the rope
                  either way, making the loop larger or smaller. I put the splice at least 6
                  feet from the end of the rope and close to the end that attaches to the
                  hammock. That way my end loop can be adjusted to short (3 inches) or long
                  (3 feet) or anywhere in between. This is easily done after the hammock is
                  put up as long as nobody is in it. Try it with cheap polypropylene rope
                  first (make sure it's strong enough), but if you're like me and value
                  compactness in addition to light weight you'll switch to spectra. Wakeboard
                  rope (1500 lb.+ test?) is fine, but I recently got some Amsteel 7/64" rope
                  (1200 lb. test) which packs up very small. One caveat: it is so thin that
                  it doesn't look strong enough to hold you. I've had two humans and a dog in
                  my hammock, but it took some persuading to get the second human in. You can
                  make a splicing tool from a piece of stiff wire, doubled. Reach through the
                  center of the rope and pull a loop of string through, then use the string to
                  pull the rope back the other way.

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                • natesdenn71
                  My hammock came with 6mm climbing rope. This has worked great! I also bought two sections of 1/2 inch tubular webbing each 12ft. long from a climbing shop to
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jan 6, 2007
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                    My hammock came with 6mm climbing rope. This has worked great! I
                    also bought two sections of 1/2 inch tubular webbing each 12ft. long
                    from a climbing shop to use a tree straps. I went with a lot of
                    webbing to make sure I could tie up on MOST trees. I have pics of my
                    set up on the group page under "Nates Hammock" I am also a big guy at
                    6'2" 280lbs. My system has not shown any signs of failing (yet)!!
                    Good luck!
                  • Sandy Kramer
                    i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half) ... and bought some 100-lb. test
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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                      i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of
                      rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half)


                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Keith YOung <tory1942@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears,
                      and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope,
                      and burned the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling
                      this rope on each end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than
                      enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8").
                      Seems to work. I use the carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-
                      hook on the end of the hammock.
                      >
                      >
                    • Keith YOung
                      Hi, Sandy, I bought a 50 package of 100# test polypropylene soft rope from Sears, then cut that length in half, seal/melting the ends with a flame. However,
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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                        Hi, Sandy,

                        I bought a 50' package of 100# test polypropylene soft rope from Sears, then cut that length in half, seal/melting the ends with a flame.

                        However, look at the other posts on the topic of "very tall man." It seems that the strains on the lines is much more than I'd anticipated. Handing a hammock (indoors) with a sag of about 30 deg. seems best, but the strains on EACH rope are at least equal to my weight (a bit less than 300 lbs. -- which is in proportion to my height at 6' 8"). Figure out the strtains, based on your own weight. Look up Youngblood's chart, at the files part of this Yahoo Club.

                        I've doubled each rope, but am now looking at woven polyester strapping tape (possibly tubular), "MuleTape" or climber's rope, with a test strength of about 800 to 1200 lbs. range.

                        I don't have to pay quite so much attention to ultralight philosophy, since I'll be on my motor scooter (but, at 650cc's, it's a "fire-breathing, wolf-in-sheep's-clothing" scooter), and it will carry the weight for me. If the temperature drops down close to 50 deg F., it's a motel for sure.

                        Since I'm inside, and in the spare upstairs bedroom this winter, I've drilled out holes in 90-year-old red oak studs, put in screw-eyes with a twist bar and also placed a bunch of cushions and pillows under me, until I get this right.

                        Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@...> wrote:

                        i ordered the double treklight...what is the recommended length of
                        rope ... total to purchase?? (then cut in half)

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Keith YOung <tory1942@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > I did have to buy my own rope for the hammock, so I went to Sears,
                        and bought some 100-lb. test polypropylene reduced-stretch soft rope,
                        and burned the ends to prevent un-raveling. I figured that doubling
                        this rope on each end would give me a 400-lb. strength, more than
                        enough to cover my near 300-lb weight (remembering that I'm 6' 8").
                        Seems to work. I use the carabiners to clip the rope end to the "S"-
                        hook on the end of the hammock.
                        >
                        >





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                      • terry_and_pearl
                        Polyester webbing works really great. Very little to no stretch and doesn t abrade or absorb water like nylon. Don t get the real thick stuff. Also, the
                        Message 11 of 15 , Jan 8, 2007
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                          Polyester webbing works really great. Very little to no stretch and
                          doesn't abrade or absorb water like nylon. Don't get the real thick
                          stuff. Also, the polyester webbing works as your tree hugger as well
                          as the suspension. Form the webbing into a giant loop and girth hitch
                          to the tree with the free end hooked into the carabiner and then
                          tighten with a double ring buckle. In this manner you will have 2
                          lengths of webbing suspending the hammock from the tree, each with
                          half the load.

                          A double ring buckle works very good. As good as a cam buckle to
                          tighten. A little trickier to loosen, but once you learn the trick it
                          is easy and simple to loosen also. Also, the double ring buckle will
                          be a lot stronger than the cam buckle and won't have any abrasive
                          effect on the webbing like a cam buckle could.

                          I use 1,000 lb, 1" polyester webbing. These from Harbor Frieght:

                          http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=40063

                          work really great. Cut off the cam buckle and sew another loop in its
                          place with 2 rings in the loop.

                          I use the SMC descending rings. They're AL with a very high rated
                          capacity, light and cheap (about $2.50 each, you will need 4):

                          http://www.smcgear.net/products.asp?cat=5&pid=44

                          Using these, a double ring buckle will weigh only about 0.8 oz - good
                          even for those that watch their weight and the webbing is very light also.
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