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Re: Built my dream hammock

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  • Sandy Kramer
    ... ditto... PS Don t try it in Florida without no see um mesh!
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 29, 2006
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Holy Hammocks, Batman! We need PICTURES!!!
      >

      ditto...

      PS Don't try it in Florida without no see 'um mesh!
    • jonas4321
      ... Yes. Just remember, the loose end of the hammock must end up on the same side of the finished bend as the bitter end (free end) of the rope or webbing.
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 30, 2006
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
        >
        > -Okay, guys. I'm always ready to try new stuff.
        >
        > Re. the double sheet bend.
        >
        > Is the "larger line" the bunched up hammock end itself?

        Yes.

        Just remember, the "loose" end of the hammock must end up on the same
        side of the finished bend as the bitter end (free end) of the rope or
        webbing. They must exit the same side. If they exit opposite sides,
        you'll have a danger of the bend slipping.

        Sorry, that hurt my head just re-reading it.

        A properly tied sheet bend has both free ends of the ropes on the same
        side of the finished bend. If you imagine the hammock being one of the
        ropes, you'll get what I mean.

        Here's a web page that has a picture of the knot (um, bend):

        http://www.scoutxing.com/knots/double_sheet_bend/double_sheet_bend.gif

        Jonas
      • Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security)
        Hangers: I ve added a series of photos of my Dream Hammock to my album: Bear s Pix. As you may recall, this is a three-layer hammock patterned after Tom
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 4, 2006
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          Hangers:

          I've added a series of photos of my "Dream Hammock" to my album: Bear's Pix. As you may recall, this is a three-layer hammock patterned after Tom Claytor's "Mosquito Hammock" but with no zippers.

          For these photos, I replaced the one-foot loop of cord in the casing with some long tubular nylon straps so I could spread the ends out flat.

          I think the photo captions explain the construction fairly well. The photos with the hammock hung show how the netting presses itself against the body of the hammock.

          I took it out to Myakka River State Park this weekend (Saturday night) for a test run. It worked well, but not perfectly.

          I spent a lot more time fussing with the netting than I'd have liked to. It tended to lay against my face from the side. If I make a V2 of the hammock, I might make the lifting grossgrain straps 18 inches wide and add loops at the ends, so I can put a stick between the end loops to spread the netting.

          Also, If you roll over on your side, there's a risk the netting will make a gap immediately opposite your face. I think this is because the tension caused by the shock cord running underneath puts the entire edge of the netting under tension -- normally a good thing. But that tight edge wants to be below your shoulder when you're on your back for best sealing. When you're on your side -- it has nothing to snap around.

          But once I put on a sleeping cap and my poncho liner, the netting stayed away from me. Even when I rolled, there were no gaps. No bites in the morning. Hooray!

          Maybe I was just too sensitized to the potential problems and consequently fussed too much. Once I was asleep, it seemed to handle itself without my intervention.

          As it stands, the hammock is 1 lb, 4 oz. I think even lighter materials could be used for the body. I'll bet it could be made under a pound.

          Bear
          <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=8969804/grpspId=1705065843/msgId=16436/stime=1164650894/nc1=1/nc2=2/nc3=3>



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jeff
          Great pics, Bear...looks like an excellent project. Maybe if you sewed a small strip of elastic, maybe 3 long, right where the netting sags onto your face, it
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 4, 2006
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            Great pics, Bear...looks like an excellent project.

            Maybe if you sewed a small strip of elastic, maybe 3" long, right
            where the netting sags onto your face, it would tighten it up enough
            to keep it off your face.

            Also, I think you may have discussed this before but I don't remember
            the details. On the close-up pic of your rings attachment, is that
            just a cord holding the rings, then the webbing passes through it?
            Has that been strong enough to hold you well w/o slipping? And it's
            easy to undo in the morning?

            Jeff
          • Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security)
            Jeff: If you mean the photo titled Rings close up then what you re looking at is the stock configuration of a Travel Hammock. It s a single layer of
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 4, 2006
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              Jeff:

              If you mean the photo titled "Rings close up" then what you're looking at is the stock configuration of a "Travel Hammock."

              It's a single layer of parachute nylon with a casing. They use 7 or 8 mm prussik cord through the casing. I attached my two rings using a Lark's head hitch -- didn't even have to untie the stock loop.

              And yes, it holds just fine and is easy to adjust or release in the morning.

              Some folks can't find the right combination of webbing and rings to make it work without slipping, but I don't have that problem. (Maybe it's got something to do with my body weight?)

              All that happens is that the surface of the webbing gets either really compressed or hot or something that makes it a bit shiny. But that doesn't seem to impact the operation much.

              If you look at the "Ring and toggle" photo, that method seems even better to me. And you'll notice that topologically, the ring and toggle is the same as a common ladder buckle.

              I'd like to be the first to advance the theory that if we could find a sufficiently thick ladder buckle, that's all we'd need for a simple, adjustable strap system. I've tried it with a wire ladder buckle of about 1/8 inch gauge wire, but the force just bends the middle wire in. Once the webbing goes flat, it starts to slip.

              Bear


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            • Ralph Oborn
              OK I think I understand now????? 1) By using the two clips on the bugnet you create a virtual ridgeline to suspend the net. 2) would a couple more underbody
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 4, 2006
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                OK I think I understand now?????

                1) By using the two clips on the bugnet you create a "virtual" ridgeline to
                suspend the net.
                2) would a couple more underbody loops help keep the net tight around your
                shoulers?


                3) I like the straps, I'm gonna try them.

                Ralph


                On 12/4/06, Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security) <david.chinell@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Hangers:
                >
                > I've added a series of photos of my "Dream Hammock" to my album: Bear's
                > Pix. As you may recall, this is a three-layer hammock patterned after Tom
                > Claytor's "Mosquito Hammock" but with no zippers.
                >
                > For these photos, I replaced the one-foot loop of cord in the casing with
                > some long tubular nylon straps so I could spread the ends out flat.
                >
                > I think the photo captions explain the construction fairly well. The
                > photos with the hammock hung show how the netting presses itself against the
                > body of the hammock.
                >
                > I took it out to Myakka River State Park this weekend (Saturday night) for
                > a test run. It worked well, but not perfectly.
                >
                > I spent a lot more time fussing with the netting than I'd have liked to.
                > It tended to lay against my face from the side. If I make a V2 of the
                > hammock, I might make the lifting grossgrain straps 18 inches wide and add
                > loops at the ends, so I can put a stick between the end loops to spread the
                > netting.
                >
                > Also, If you roll over on your side, there's a risk the netting will make
                > a gap immediately opposite your face. I think this is because the tension
                > caused by the shock cord running underneath puts the entire edge of the
                > netting under tension -- normally a good thing. But that tight edge wants to
                > be below your shoulder when you're on your back for best sealing. When
                > you're on your side -- it has nothing to snap around.
                >
                > But once I put on a sleeping cap and my poncho liner, the netting stayed
                > away from me. Even when I rolled, there were no gaps. No bites in the
                > morning. Hooray!
                >
                > Maybe I was just too sensitized to the potential problems and consequently
                > fussed too much. Once I was asleep, it seemed to handle itself without my
                > intervention.
                >
                > As it stands, the hammock is 1 lb, 4 oz. I think even lighter materials
                > could be used for the body. I'll bet it could be made under a pound.
                >
                > Bear
                >
                > http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=8969804/grpspId=1705065843/msgId=16436/stime=1164650894/nc1=1/nc2=2/nc3=3
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security)
                Ralph: Yes, you ve got it right. I ve been thinking about ways to improve the seal as well. I m loath to add any more clips that have to be undone and redone
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 5, 2006
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                  Ralph:

                  Yes, you've got it right.

                  I've been thinking about ways to improve the seal as well. I'm loath to add any more clips that have to be undone and redone to get in an out. It's supposed to be at least as easy as using a zipper.

                  However, I'm considering experimenting with two puller straps, maybe around 1/3 the way along the sides, rather than one in the middle. That might be an acceptable compromise between solid sealing and ease of entry.

                  Bear


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Cara Lin Bridgman
                  Taking a look at your dream hammock, my first thought was two puller straps, too. Placed just as you state below. But, the I began to wonder about this
                  Message 8 of 21 , Dec 6, 2006
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                    Taking a look at your dream hammock, my first thought was two puller
                    straps, too. Placed just as you state below.

                    But, the I began to wonder about this alternative: What if you used
                    twice the width of mosquito netting. The netting would run from halfway
                    underneath, around the top, and back to halfway underneath. The netting
                    would only be sewn to the hammock at the casings. The rest of it
                    would be loose. Having the ends sewn to the casing, may keep the net
                    wrapped around you. So, all you'd have to do is pull the net up to
                    climb in and out, no calisthenics to connect puller straps underneath
                    you. That's the theory, but I probably do not have enough real-world
                    experience to predict how well it will work. For all I know, the net
                    would wind up as a rope over your head.

                    If this works, it would allow you to eliminate the puller straps all
                    together. The biggest disadvantage I see so far is that this will
                    prevent you from flipping the hammock over for a net-free night (among
                    other uses). This might be solved with bungies and mitten-hooks (rather
                    like installing a JRB quilt on the wrong side) instead of sewing the
                    loose halves into the underside of the hammock casing.

                    CL

                    Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security) wrote:
                    > However, I'm considering experimenting with two puller straps, maybe around 1/3 the way along the sides, rather than one in the middle. That might be an acceptable compromise between solid sealing and ease of entry.
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