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Re: [Hammock Camping] Built my dream hammock

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  • Brindon John Quinitio
    Jungle hammock... sounds like the kind of hammock that I need. ^_^. I hope you can post some pictures. -brindon john ... From: Chinell, David F (GE Indust,
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 27, 2006
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      Jungle hammock... sounds like the kind of hammock that I need. ^_^.
      I hope you can post some pictures.

      -brindon john


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: "Chinell, David F (GE Indust, Security)" <david.chinell@...>
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2006 1:42:26 AM
      Subject: [Hammock Camping] Built my dream hammock

      Hangers:

      There are no pictures, so this may be a bit wordy. Over the holidays, my Rita helped me sew together my dream hammock. It's a design I've been thinking about for years while I swung in other people's designs. It's a three-layer, jungle hammock type, much like the Mosquito Hammocks, but with no zippers.

      Here's how it goes. Dimensions are finished dimensions and do not include casing allowances.

      The bottom two layers are 1.1 oz ripstop nylon (not silnylon). These pieces are 4 ft. 6 in. wide, and 8 ft long. They are joined at the ends to form a casing. The casing also includes the netting layer.

      The third layer is mosquito netting. (Would have preferred no-seeum, but couldn't get it at the time.) This layer is 5 ft. wide and 8 ft. long. All three layers are folded to form the casing.

      In addition, all three layers are sewn together for 12 inches, starting at the casing. In this area, the extra width of the netting (3 inches on each side) is tucked between the bottom layers before all three layers are sewn together.

      The netting has four areas where grossgrain ribbon straps are sewn on. Two of the straps are used to hold the netting up at the ends. Two are used to pull the netting together underneath me at the center of the hammock.

      The straps that hold the netting up are 18 inches from the casing. They are about six inches long, running parallel to the casing, and in the middle of the netting. They're made by sticking a strip inside the netting, then sticking another strip with a preformed loop on the outside, then sewing them together. (Hooray for spray adhesive!) To each loop, I attached a yard of 1/8-inch shock cord with a mitten hook at either end. One mitten hook goes through the loop, the other hook will go to my ridgeline or to the tree rope.

      The straps that pull the netting together under my butt are shaped like upside-down Ts. The base of the T runs along the edge of the netting. It's about 12 inches long and centered along the length of the netting. The vertical stem is about 7 inches long, and runs perpendicular to the edge of the netting. It's doubled over to from its own loop, which extends an inch below the edge of the netting. I use another yard of 1/8-inch shock cord to form an 18-inch loop, tied through one of the strap loops, and through a mitten hook. Once I'm in the hammock, I pull the shock cord under me to the other side, and hook the mitten hook into the other loop.

      Finally, I use two feet of 5mm rope to create a one foot loop through the casing at each end. I attach a 1-1/2 inch diameter metal ring to each loop using a lark's head.

      In practice...

      I attach my tree ropes to the tree, leaving about a yard of running end. The running end goes through the metal ring on the hammock, gets adjusted, then tied off using a Hennessy hitch or slipped sheet bend.

      If there are no bugs, I put the netting side down.

      If there are bugs, I put the netting side up, attach the shock cords at the ends to my ridge line or the tree ropes. Getting in or out just involves using the hook to attach or unattach the shock cord running underneath me.

      There are areas at the head and foot where the netting may gap away from the hammock material, but once these are arranged to run below the droop of the hammock, they press firmly against the hammock sides as if by magic. The widths of the base and netting panels are, for me, optimal to ensure protection.

      I like having the bottom two layers open along their length so I can insert and adjust my insulating pads from both sides. I also like that the hammock is symmetrical -- there's no head or foot, left or right.

      There. That's it. I wouldn't mind in the least if someone with high volume manufacturing capabilities experimented with this design using even better materials and ended up offering it as an ultra-light model, so I can have the seams perfect, and can order another one whenever I want to hook somebody else on hammocking.

      Bear


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    • CC Wayah
      How much does this hammock weigh? You do know this is the important question.! CCWayah Built my dream hammock ... Rita helped me sew together my dream hammock.
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 28, 2006
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        How much does this hammock weigh?
        You do know this is the important question.!

        CCWayah

        Built my dream hammock


        > Hangers:
        >
        > There are no pictures, so this may be a bit wordy. Over the holidays, my
        Rita helped me sew together my dream hammock.
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