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Hammock Camping Re: I need help!!

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  • Coy
    Thats closer to nature than I want to get. So if a flying slinter of wood did not get you I still think you would be unharmed. Don t want to test the theory
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2003
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      Thats closer to nature than I want to get. So if a flying slinter of
      wood did not get you I still think you would be unharmed. Don't want
      to test the theory though. Any takers?

      Coy Boy

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Christina Moon "
      <moonpi@i...> wrote:
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Kim Muller" <kim004@f...>
      > wrote:
      > > What are the dangers of lightning while in a hammock tied
      between 2
      > trees?
      >
      > The first answer that popped into my mind was an experience I had
      > last summer right in my own back yard. We'd had some thunder and
      > lightning, but nothing for about half an hour. It was very quiet
      and
      > I was hanging out on my deck in one of my hammock chairs. All of
      a
      > sudden I heard the loudest boom I'd ever heard, coupled with an
      > incredibly bright flash of light that went horizontal to the
      ground
      > and out in a circular direction (like when a pebble hits still
      > water). Lightning had hit a tree just a short distance from my
      house
      > and split it right down the middle.
      >
      > I felt the energy of it go through me like the proverbial
      lightning
      > bolt that it was. It was awesome!!!
      >
      > I called a couple of neighbors, neither of whom lives close enough
      to
      > see my house, or woods in the summer. One had heard the boom, but
      > didn't see the flash of light. The other, who is about half a
      mile
      > away through dense woods, did see the flash of light as she heard
      the
      > boom.
      >
      > Later I went out to see the tree. It was charred from top to
      bottom,
      > with splinters of it thrown many feet all around it. At the base
      of
      > it was a rock in the shape of a heart, with a half shell
      fossilized
      > into it. Needless to say, I picked that up and brought it back to
      > the house, where it has a place of honor.
      >
      > So, I'd say that the worst possible danger of being in a hammock
      > between two trees (besides being hit directly) would be to have a
      > bolt of lightning hit one of the tie-up trees!
      >
      > Cheers!
      >
      > Christina
    • Ed Speer
      Kim, this is an excellent question--unfortunately I ve never been willing to personally test the possibilities! Obviously anyone close to a tree being struck
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 2, 2003
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        Kim, this is an excellent question--unfortunately I've never been willing to personally test the possibilities!  Obviously anyone close to a tree being struck by lighting is likely to get seriously hurt or even killed.  I don't know of an actual case of a hammock user being hit, but I can't imagine it turning out well.  Although the scientist in me wants to argure that a hammock user would be safely isolated from the conductive tree or ground by the poor-conductive hanging ropes/straps and the nylon fabric, I do know that the electrical strike often arcs or jumps from the tree to the much-more conductive ground.  This produces the usual splittng of the tree and often the explosive fragmenting of the tree which sends deadly slivers and splinters of the tree in all directions.  Anyone unfortunate enought to be nearby, including a hammock user, can get seriously hurt.  Of course, large falling branches or trees might also be deadly.
         
        In addition anyone caught within the zone of arc between the tree and the ground when the charge jumps is likely to suffer deadly electricution (same phenomenon that can happen when lightening strikes a rock shelter or overhang--anyone inside can get fried).  This all makes me very wary of electrical stroms--thus I try to avoid exposed or high ground when choosing hammock sites when stroms are expected...Ed
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kim Muller [mailto:kim004@...]
        Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 9:27 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Re: I need help!!

        <<Keep going out in different conditions...  But be careful of the
        lightening storms! >>
         
        What are the dangers of lightning while in a hammock tied between 2 trees?


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      • Rick
        Kim, Dittos to all the below. Though I am willing to do some rather crazy testing, going out in lightning for the fun of it is not part of my schedule for the
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 2, 2003
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          Kim,

          Dittos to all the below.

          Though I am willing to do some rather crazy testing, going out in
          lightning for the fun of it is not part of my schedule for the
          forseeable future.

          However, the scientist in me would propose the following list to
          directly answer your question:

          - crush injury (including brain)
          - perforation of body organ
          - electrocution
          - large burns
          - nomination for the Darwin Award

          Would I rather be in a hammock during an electrical storm than on the
          ground? You betcha! If those are the only two choices, I'd rather
          be lying under my quilt, with my eyes shut, when the lightning
          strikes. It might offer protection from the electrical pulse in the
          ground from a nearby strike. If a direct strike, why not be lying
          down peacefully and relaxed, instead of crouching like a ball,
          standing on my now soaked sleeping pad? I figure a direct strike
          will cause an almost immediate meeting our maker regardless.

          Rick
          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
          > Kim, this is an excellent question--unfortunately I've never been
          > willing to personally test the possibilities! Obviously anyone
          close to
          > a tree being struck by lighting is likely to get seriously hurt or
          even
          > killed. I don't know of an actual case of a hammock user being
          hit, but
          > I can't imagine it turning out well. Although the scientist in me
          wants
          > to argure that a hammock user would be safely isolated from the
          > conductive tree or ground by the poor-conductive hanging
          ropes/straps
          > and the nylon fabric, I do know that the electrical strike often
          arcs or
          > jumps from the tree to the much-more conductive ground. This
          produces
          > the usual splittng of the tree and often the explosive fragmenting
          of
          > the tree which sends deadly slivers and splinters of the tree in all
          > directions. Anyone unfortunate enought to be nearby, including a
          > hammock user, can get seriously hurt. Of course, large falling
          branches
          > or trees might also be deadly.
          >
          > In addition anyone caught within the zone of arc between the tree
          and
          > the ground when the charge jumps is likely to suffer deadly
          > electricution (same phenomenon that can happen when lightening
          strikes a
          > rock shelter or overhang--anyone inside can get fried). This all
          makes
          > me very wary of electrical stroms--thus I try to avoid exposed or
          high
          > ground when choosing hammock sites when stroms are expected...Ed
          >
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Kim Muller [mailto:kim004@f...]
          > Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 9:27 PM
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Re: I need help!!
          >
          >
          > <<Keep going out in different conditions... But be careful of the
          > lightening storms! >>
          >
          > What are the dangers of lightning while in a hammock tied between 2
          > trees?
          >
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