Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

homemade progress?

Expand Messages
  • teblum
    After asking about how to sleep comfortably a week os so back, I decided my hammock needed to be longer in order to get sidewayser (??New term??)in it. So I
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 24, 2006
      After asking about how to sleep comfortably a week os so back, I
      decided my hammock needed to be longer in order to get sidewayser
      (??New term??)in it.

      So I remade my test hammock design towards a mayan hammock, with cords
      on the ends. To reinforce the ends, I sewed cotton belting into two
      wraps at each end, put in 11 eyelets equally spaced across the ends
      and tied 11 3 foot lengths of cord through.

      I tightened the outer pieces a bit and knotted the ends. My test posts
      on my back porch were barely wide enough to hang the thing.

      I climbed/rolled into it and it was better. Unfortunately, the tighter
      outer cords caused the fabric to rip.

      I guess I need to hem the fabric all the way around and then tie the
      cords with equal lengths.

      My purchased Byer Mosquito is due today, but UPS shows it has only
      left Jacksonville Florida, so maybe not until tororrow.

      Onward and upward towds a good nights sleep while suspended

      Tom
    • Sandy Kramer
      I was thinking of you yesterday, Tom. Visited my Venezuelan niece who lives in Weston and spent a couple of cozy hours - mit book and pooch - lazing in her
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 24, 2006
        I was thinking of you yesterday, Tom. Visited my Venezuelan niece
        who lives in Weston and spent a couple of cozy hours - mit book and
        pooch - lazing in her Venezuelan hammock.

        This kind, although woven with a thick cotton thread called pavilo,
        had the fringe (we call it "una hamaca") and was very soft. The
        other more string-like woven ones are called "chinchorros" in
        Venezuela.

        Speaking of homemade, I'm in the process of making the "ray-way tarp"
        with a view to using it with my Byer's hammock. Some Backpacking
        Light reviews on super-ultralight backpacks shared my discovery:
        sewing silnylon is slippery and a pain.

        Not only that, but two pieces 108" long had to have 11 inches trimmed
        off the edges, which required finicky marking and cutting.

        And I couldn't be bothered to tuck-and-pin all the fabric for the
        felled seams. It won't win any prizes for beauty, just hope it works.

        Am struggling right now with trying to understand how to attach the
        beaks!! Hate not having pattern pieces...

        I'm also referring to Ed's tarp-making instructions in Hammock
        Camping to see what to incorporate. and I'm going to add that grommet
        to the center/ridge "point" loop so the tip of a hiking stick can
        slip through.

        I've got to dig out the HH coated tarp to see how they made those
        little pockets to store the guide/guy lines.

        After this, I'll make the bug tarp tent that just "clips" to the top
        of the tarp. This will be back up in case no suitable trees are
        available.

        sandy in miami

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
        >
        > After asking about how to sleep comfortably a week os so back, I
        > decided my hammock needed to be longer in order to get sidewayser
        > (??New term??)in it.
        >
        > So I remade my test hammock design towards a mayan hammock, with
        cords
        > on the ends. To reinforce the ends, I sewed cotton belting into two
        > wraps at each end, put in 11 eyelets equally spaced across the ends
        > and tied 11 3 foot lengths of cord through.
        >
        > I tightened the outer pieces a bit and knotted the ends. My test
        posts
        > on my back porch were barely wide enough to hang the thing.
        >
        > I climbed/rolled into it and it was better. Unfortunately, the
        tighter
        > outer cords caused the fabric to rip.
        >
        > I guess I need to hem the fabric all the way around and then tie the
        > cords with equal lengths.
        >
        > My purchased Byer Mosquito is due today, but UPS shows it has only
        > left Jacksonville Florida, so maybe not until tororrow.
        >
        > Onward and upward towds a good nights sleep while suspended
        >
        > Tom
        >
      • teblum
        The UPS came at about 5 PM. The hammock was up by 5:30. for a cheapie in $, it seems very well made. In its pack it s about a big as a cantalope and no weight
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 24, 2006
          The UPS came at about 5 PM. The hammock was up by 5:30.
          for a cheapie in $, it seems very well made. In its' pack it's about a
          big as a cantalope and no weight at all. I first climbed in with the
          net on the bottom. It stretched out and I touched down a bit.
          Tightened and raised the straps a bit and got very close to the so
          called sweet spot.

          Then I flipped it net side up and strung the net cord. That will take
          a bit of practice to get perfect so that the net doesn't hang in your
          face. Someone suggested shock cord, which I think would be a good
          addition.

          Seeing this unit, my homemade isn't so far off. I'll redo it in a
          longer image of the Byer when I get bored.

          But first, it's time to try sleeping in it for a full night.

          Tom
        • Sandy Kramer
          Hey, Tom, that sounds as if it took you 30 mins to set it up!! Let me know when you work out the way to tie off the net s cord. Remember, it s only a cheapie
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 25, 2006
            Hey, Tom, that sounds as if it took you 30 mins to set it up!!

            Let me know when you work out the way to tie off the net's cord.

            Remember, it's only a cheapie to us. The brand name is good. C&C is
            now now selling them for $36 and someone else has them for $76. And
            many outdoor items are made in China, which accounts for the lower
            pricing. We'll see how the quality stands up.

            sandy in miami

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
            >
            > The UPS came at about 5 PM. The hammock was up by 5:30.
            > for a cheapie in $, it seems very well made. In its' pack it's
            about a
            > big as a cantalope and no weight at all. I first climbed in with the
            > net on the bottom. It stretched out and I touched down a bit.
            > Tightened and raised the straps a bit and got very close to the so
            > called sweet spot.
            >
            > Then I flipped it net side up and strung the net cord. That will
            take
            > a bit of practice to get perfect so that the net doesn't hang in
            your
            > face. Someone suggested shock cord, which I think would be a good
            > addition.
            >
            > Seeing this unit, my homemade isn't so far off. I'll redo it in a
            > longer image of the Byer when I get bored.
            >
            > But first, it's time to try sleeping in it for a full night.
            >
            > Tom
            >
          • Tom Blum
            Campout report. It takes about 5 minutes to hang it Sandy. Hanging it perfectly may take a lifetime. Sadness. Failure again. About 3 hours in, I woke up stiff
            Message 5 of 19 , Oct 25, 2006
              Campout report.

              It takes about 5 minutes to hang it Sandy. Hanging it perfectly may take
              a lifetime.

              Sadness. Failure again. About 3 hours in, I woke up stiff as a (insert
              your own metaphor) Tried to go back to sleep. No luck. Retreated to bed
              for balance of night.

              Maybe, the sweet spot I discovered went away when I had to raise the
              hammock??? It is very hard to readjust your position in a hammock the
              way I do in my bed when I wake up stiff.

              I practised at lunch today. It feels good for naps.

              I added a tensioned ridge rope, like hennessy has, to be able to lock in
              the sag if I ever find a spot I just love.

              Life goes on.

              Tom
              Sandy Kramer wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hey, Tom, that sounds as if it took you 30 mins to set it up!!
              >
              > Let me know when you work out the way to tie off the net's cord.
              >
              > Remember, it's only a cheapie to us. The brand name is good. C&C is
              > now now selling them for $36 and someone else has them for $76. And
              > many outdoor items are made in China, which accounts for the lower
              > pricing. We'll see how the quality stands up.
              >
              > sandy in miami
              >
              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > The UPS came at about 5 PM. The hammock was up by 5:30.
              > > for a cheapie in $, it seems very well made. In its' pack it's
              > about a
              > > big as a cantalope and no weight at all. I first climbed in with the
              > > net on the bottom. It stretched out and I touched down a bit.
              > > Tightened and raised the straps a bit and got very close to the so
              > > called sweet spot.
              > >
              > > Then I flipped it net side up and strung the net cord. That will
              > take
              > > a bit of practice to get perfect so that the net doesn't hang in
              > your
              > > face. Someone suggested shock cord, which I think would be a good
              > > addition.
              > >
              > > Seeing this unit, my homemade isn't so far off. I'll redo it in a
              > > longer image of the Byer when I get bored.
              > >
              > > But first, it's time to try sleeping in it for a full night.
              > >
              > > Tom
              > >
              >
              >
            • Tom Blum
              About the cord. I just pull the slider out and attach the little clip to the cord past the slider. In that way the loop size is adjusted to get the tension you
              Message 6 of 19 , Oct 25, 2006
                About the cord.

                I just pull the slider out and attach the little clip to the cord past
                the slider. In that way the loop size is adjusted to get the tension you
                need. No problem at all with the netting.

                Tom

                The 30 minutes included opening the box and ooohing and aaahing at the
                quality of my $18 hammock. How they can make these things in asia
                somewhere and then ship them across the Pacific at that price is a
                mystery to me.!!!

                Tom

                Sandy Kramer wrote:
                >
                >
                > Hey, Tom, that sounds as if it took you 30 mins to set it up!!
                >
                > Let me know when you work out the way to tie off the net's cord.
                >
                > Remember, it's only a cheapie to us. The brand name is good. C&C is
                > now now selling them for $36 and someone else has them for $76. And
                > many outdoor items are made in China, which accounts for the lower
                > pricing. We'll see how the quality stands up.
                >
                > sandy in miami
                >
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                > <mailto:hammockcamping%40yahoogroups.com>, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > The UPS came at about 5 PM. The hammock was up by 5:30.
                > > for a cheapie in $, it seems very well made. In its' pack it's
                > about a
                > > big as a cantalope and no weight at all. I first climbed in with the
                > > net on the bottom. It stretched out and I touched down a bit.
                > > Tightened and raised the straps a bit and got very close to the so
                > > called sweet spot.
                > >
                > > Then I flipped it net side up and strung the net cord. That will
                > take
                > > a bit of practice to get perfect so that the net doesn't hang in
                > your
                > > face. Someone suggested shock cord, which I think would be a good
                > > addition.
                > >
                > > Seeing this unit, my homemade isn't so far off. I'll redo it in a
                > > longer image of the Byer when I get bored.
                > >
                > > But first, it's time to try sleeping in it for a full night.
                > >
                > > Tom
                > >
                >
                >
              • tim garner
                Tom Blum wrote:. The 30 minutes included opening the box and ooohing and aaahing at the quality of my $18 hammock. How they can make these
                Message 7 of 19 , Oct 25, 2006
                  Tom Blum <teblum@...> wrote:.
                  The 30 minutes included opening the box and ooohing and aaahing at the
                  quality of my $18 hammock. How they can make these things in asia
                  somewhere and then ship them across the Pacific at that price is a
                  mystery to me.!!!

                  Tom

                  child labor??? slavery??? :~} i don`t know either.
                  i`m not trying to give you a hard time my friend, i just have to question myself sometimes too when i buy cheap stuff from the dollar tree or harbor freight or somewhere like that.
                  sorry... i just couldn`t resist that one <G> ...tim



                  don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


                  ---------------------------------
                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Sandy Kramer
                  Tom, it sounds as if you (like me) have arthritis. The only thing that gives me the best sleep is my 3 memory foam mattress topper. I plan to try sleeping
                  Message 8 of 19 , Oct 25, 2006
                    Tom, it sounds as if you (like me) have arthritis. The only thing
                    that gives me the best sleep is my 3" memory foam mattress topper. I
                    plan to try sleeping in the hammock this weekend. Surely I will
                    sleep better than on a camping mattress pad on the ground!!

                    Regardless of how I sleep...getting up is always painful. Usually
                    drag myself over to the hot tub to loosen up.

                    Am reading a book called Rowing to Latitude and they talk about
                    taking lots of Vitamin I (Ibuprofen).

                    I doubt whether I can compress memory foam enough to put in a pack!!

                    sandy in miami



                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Tom Blum <teblum@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Campout report.
                    >
                    > >
                    > Sadness. Failure again. About 3 hours in, I woke up stiff as a
                    (insert > your own metaphor) Tried to go back to sleep. No luck.
                    Retreated to bed > for balance of night.
                    >
                    > Maybe
                  • teblum
                    Yesterday I added a ridgeline, which allowed me to hang the hammock with more sag, without dragging the ground. Last night, I bravely went to sleep again in my
                    Message 9 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                      Yesterday I added a ridgeline, which allowed me to hang the hammock
                      with more sag, without dragging the ground.

                      Last night, I bravely went to sleep again in my mosquito traveler. I
                      woke up feeling good (not particularily stiff) and thought the sky was
                      getting grey. Got up happily only to learn the grey was moonlight and
                      it was 1:30 AM.

                      BUT, I was able to go back to sleep and slept til nearly 7AM.

                      With the added sag, I can sleep on my side or stomach.

                      Life is GOOD!!!

                      Thanks to everyone for their help and advice while I sorted this out.
                      Doctari, on another forum, reported the exact ridgeline length he had
                      good luck with. (8 1/2 Ft). That's what I used.

                      Also: It made sense to me to tie the ridgeline through the tieoff
                      loops in the hammock itself. Overnight, these began to elongate. Today
                      I moved the ridgeline fastening point to the hanging straps, just
                      beyond the hammock itself.
                    • Dave Womble
                      Tom, Glad you are figuring out how to get it the way you like it. You might be interested in article 3 in this newsletter about Hammock Sag Angle:
                      Message 10 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                        Tom,

                        Glad you are figuring out how to get it the way you like it. You
                        might be interested in article 3 in this newsletter about Hammock Sag
                        Angle: http://www.hammockcamping.com/Newsletters/2006/Jan2006.htm .
                        Basically you are looking at a little geometry problem and there are
                        a few ways to solve it. Don't forget that you can tie the hammock
                        off at different heights on the supports to change how close the
                        bottom of the hammock comes to the ground. I think that is one point
                        that most folks overlook when they first start out with hammocks and
                        they tend to tie the hammock off too low on the supports without
                        enough sag.

                        Another thing that I sometimes see is that folks sometimes forget to
                        either center their hammock between the supports or take into account
                        the effect of an uncentered hammock. Basically, the end of the
                        hammock that has the longer length of suspension line will drop
                        closer to the ground, but only when you are in it and the amount it
                        does this by is proportional to how unequal the lengths of the two
                        suspension lines are. Hammocks that have the footend lower than the
                        headend are typically problematic in that you tend to slide to the
                        footend of the hammock. Most folks like their hammocks with the
                        footend slightly elevated, some like them level but not too many, if
                        any at all, like them with the headend elevated. I find it easier to
                        deal with if I center the hammock between the supports and tie the
                        footend off a little higher on the supports than I do the headend.
                        This gives me an easier visual reading of what the slope of the
                        hammock is going to be before I get in it.

                        Dave Womble
                        aka Youngblood 2000
                        co-developer of the Speer SPE


                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Yesterday I added a ridgeline, which allowed me to hang the hammock
                        > with more sag, without dragging the ground.
                        >
                        > Last night, I bravely went to sleep again in my mosquito traveler. I
                        > woke up feeling good (not particularily stiff) and thought the sky
                        was
                        > getting grey. Got up happily only to learn the grey was moonlight
                        and
                        > it was 1:30 AM.
                        >
                        > BUT, I was able to go back to sleep and slept til nearly 7AM.
                        >
                        > With the added sag, I can sleep on my side or stomach.
                        >
                        > Life is GOOD!!!
                        >
                        > Thanks to everyone for their help and advice while I sorted this
                        out.
                        > Doctari, on another forum, reported the exact ridgeline length he
                        had
                        > good luck with. (8 1/2 Ft). That's what I used.
                        >
                        > Also: It made sense to me to tie the ridgeline through the tieoff
                        > loops in the hammock itself. Overnight, these began to elongate.
                        Today
                        > I moved the ridgeline fastening point to the hanging straps, just
                        > beyond the hammock itself.
                        >
                      • teblum
                        Dave, I had read your article on hammock sag before I started asking questions on line. Set up like your recommendations (at 30 degrees), I couldn t get
                        Message 11 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                          Dave,

                          I had read your article on hammock sag before I started asking
                          questions on line. Set up like your recommendations (at 30 degrees), I
                          couldn't get comfortable because I couldn't get diagonal or flat.

                          I just measured my set up and my angle is around 45 degrees. Go figure!!
                          I guess that just underscores how everyone is different.

                          Thanks
                          Tom
                        • Fuzzy
                          ... figure!! ... Tom, I would think - as I have not yet done any experiments myself - that you can maintain your comfort level (once you find it) by adding a
                          Message 12 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I just measured my set up and my angle is around 45 degrees. Go
                            figure!!
                            > I guess that just underscores how everyone is different.

                            Tom,

                            I would think - as I have not yet done any experiments myself - that
                            you can maintain your comfort level (once you find it) by adding a
                            ridgeline once you've got that sucker hung right. That way, once the
                            ridgeline is set, the rope angles become irrelevant and the bed will
                            always hang the same way between the ridgeline ends.

                            My 2ยข

                            Fuzzy
                            back to lurking...
                          • Dave Womble
                            Tom, You re right of course, everyone is different. Some hammocks are different as well. I think you said you were using the Byers Mosquito Hammock? It has
                            Message 13 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                              Tom,

                              You're right of course, everyone is different. Some hammocks are
                              different as well. I think you said you were using the Byers
                              Mosquito Hammock? It has been a few years since I kicked the tires
                              on the Byers Mosquito Hammock but I recall about 3 different things
                              about it. One is they used mosquito netting instead of no-see-um
                              netting. Two is that the small lines on the ends of the hammocks
                              could be a problem if they got tangled. Three is that starting from
                              the center line, they used progressively shorter lines as you go
                              towards the sides of the hammock. The third item makes the hammock
                              more stable because it keeps you in the center of the hammock but it
                              seemed to me that it made it more difficult to get the comfortable
                              diagonal lay that I was accustom to with some of the other hammocks I
                              had used that did not have the progressive shortening from the center
                              of the hammock outward. I didn't do as you did and just keep
                              increasing the sag, I'll try that if I ever get a chance to kick the
                              tires on one again. Forty-five degrees sounds like a lot of sag and
                              may be hard to get without a structural ridgeline unless you have a
                              relative short distance between the supports you tie off to.

                              Dave

                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "teblum" <teblum@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Dave,
                              >
                              > I had read your article on hammock sag before I started asking
                              > questions on line. Set up like your recommendations (at 30
                              degrees), I
                              > couldn't get comfortable because I couldn't get diagonal or flat.
                              >
                              > I just measured my set up and my angle is around 45 degrees. Go
                              figure!!
                              > I guess that just underscores how everyone is different.
                              >
                              > Thanks
                              > Tom
                              >
                            • Jeff
                              Dave, The one I just got uses noseeum netting instead of mosquito netting. The lines still tangle. The third item is interesting, though. I found it hard to
                              Message 14 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                                Dave,

                                The one I just got uses noseeum netting instead of mosquito netting.
                                The lines still tangle.

                                The third item is interesting, though. I found it hard to get the
                                sides adjusted to hold me in for the first few times I got in. One
                                time I kept leaning way over to the non-zippered edge and almost
                                tipped..it was enough of an effort to not fall into the bug net that
                                my wife came out laughing at me. But once I got out and streched the
                                other side, the looser side seemed to have tightened. Now when I lay
                                in it, it's much as you describe...but it seems that the fabric is
                                stretching and that's what keeps me from getting as comfortable as the
                                other hammocks. Same problem I had with the hammock I made from 1.1oz.

                                Regardless, there's a lot more stretch in this hammock and its ropes
                                than I've had in any other hammock so far. I'm gonna keep using it
                                for several nights and see if it stops stretching. It seems to have a
                                handful of fans so it must be more comfortable than I've found it so
                                far! I'll keep trying.

                                On a completely unrelated note, we just put in an offer on (hopefully)
                                our new home in North Carolina. Not as nervewracking as the first
                                time (b/c this one has some hammock trees) but still a bit exciting!

                                Jeff
                              • tim garner
                                Jeff wrote:. On a completely unrelated note, we just put in an offer on (hopefully) our new home in North Carolina. Not as nervewracking
                                Message 15 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                                  Jeff <jwj32542@...> wrote:.

                                  On a completely unrelated note, we just put in an offer on (hopefully)
                                  our new home in North Carolina. Not as nervewracking as the first
                                  time (b/c this one has some hammock trees) but still a bit exciting!

                                  Jeff

                                  .yes... gotta have those trees! do you think you`ll be back in nc in time for some cold weather hammocking? ...tim




                                  don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


                                  ---------------------------------
                                  Do you Yahoo!?
                                  Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail.

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Jeff
                                  ... in time for some cold weather hammocking? ...tim Yep. Hoping to close on 29 Dec. Jeff
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Oct 26, 2006
                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > .yes... gotta have those trees! do you think you`ll be back in nc
                                    in time for some cold weather hammocking? ...tim

                                    Yep. Hoping to close on 29 Dec.

                                    Jeff
                                  • tim garner
                                    all right. if we ever get a chance to hike together, i promise i`m not going to try the wet & rinse the hammock method ...tim ... in time for some
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Oct 27, 2006
                                      all right. if we ever get a chance to hike together, i promise i`m not going to try the "wet & rinse the hammock" method<G> ...tim

                                      Jeff <jwj32542@...> wrote: --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner wrote:
                                      >
                                      > .yes... gotta have those trees! do you think you`ll be back in nc
                                      in time for some cold weather hammocking? ...tim

                                      Yep. Hoping to close on 29 Dec.

                                      Jeff


                                      ..


                                      don`t leave the CREATOR out of the creation!!!


                                      ---------------------------------
                                      Do you Yahoo!?
                                      Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Jeff
                                      ... not going to try the wet & rinse the hammock method Haha...deal. Besides, the bucket wouldn t be lightweight. Double use as a campstool, though. Maybe
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Oct 27, 2006
                                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > all right. if we ever get a chance to hike together, i promise i`m
                                        not going to try the "wet & rinse the hammock" method

                                        Haha...deal. Besides, the bucket wouldn't be lightweight. Double use
                                        as a campstool, though. Maybe that's what the folks who had the Hot
                                        Springs campsite did at that one tree.

                                        But no wet and rinse, and the hike's on.

                                        Jeff
                                      • Sandy Kramer
                                        If you tie a loose knot when you put the hammock away, this should keep the lines from tangling (too much!). Just remember to undo it before you hang it up
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Oct 27, 2006
                                          If you tie a loose "knot" when you put the hammock away, this should
                                          keep the lines from tangling (too much!). Just remember to undo it
                                          before you hang it up and put your weight on it!!

                                          I'm going to try the snake skins this weekend (supposed to be useful
                                          for tangling lines and rain dripping plus easy up/down) but I'm not
                                          sure if the package is going to be as small as when it's folded into
                                          its own pocket.

                                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jwj32542@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Dave,
                                          >
                                          > The one I just got uses noseeum netting instead of mosquito netting.
                                          > The lines still tangle.
                                          >
                                          >
                                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.