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Re: Chiffon instead of noseeum as bug net

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  • rosaleen43@aol.com
    Rick- Do you really mean chiffon, or could you be talking about a fine nylon net often referred to as tulle or (bridal veil) illusion? Chiffon, to me, is
    Message 1 of 6 , May 28 3:59 AM
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      Rick-

      Do you really mean "chiffon," or could you be talking about a fine nylon net often referred to as tulle or (bridal veil) illusion?  Chiffon, to me, is even finer, a fabric that my mother would have had as an evening dress material.  It also may snag and get "pulls" more often that it would rip.  Chiffon would probably trap a lot of water, tulle, or illusion, a bit less.  Illusion netting would have been a face veil, or a bride's head dress, and be somewhat more durable, but not much.

      This is probably more than most people care to know about fabrics.  Just checking-

      Rosaleen

      Subject: Chiffon instead of noseeum as bug net

      I mentioned this in a previous post. I now have a little more
      information.

      It works well to keep all bugs out.

      It stops a little more breeze than the noseeum, but both seem to stop
      the majority of breeze coming into the hammock.

      Significant problem with the chiffon is that in a saturated
      atmosphere (in a cloud, up on a mountain) the chiffon can become
      saturated with moisture and feel quite wet.  This does not seem to be
      true of noseeum. 

      chiffon seems a little lighter than noseeum.

      So, advantage of weight, but disadvantage of getting wet...  For
      those who might care to try the stuff out.

      Rick



    • Rick
      The stuff is very sheer. It was labeled chiffon in WalMart - made of polyester. Very lightweight, much lighter in feel than noseeum. It seems very strong!
      Message 2 of 6 , May 28 4:13 AM
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        The stuff is very sheer. It was labeled chiffon in WalMart - made of
        polyester. Very lightweight, much lighter in feel than noseeum. It
        seems very strong! I have used it for more than a week of camping
        and had no problem with snags, tearing, or other problems. Only
        problem I had was that it needs to have its edge seared, unlike
        noseeum which does not need this treatment.

        Rick

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, rosaleen43@a... wrote:
        > Rick-
        >
        > Do you really mean "chiffon," or could you be talking about a fine
        nylon net
        > often referred to as tulle or (bridal veil) illusion? Chiffon, to
        me, is even
        > finer, a fabric that my mother would have had as an evening dress
        material.
        > It also may snag and get "pulls" more often that it would rip.
        Chiffon would
        > probably trap a lot of water, tulle, or illusion, a bit less.
        Illusion
        > netting would have been a face veil, or a bride's head dress, and
        be somewhat more
        > durable, but not much.
        >
        > This is probably more than most people care to know about fabrics.
        Just
        > checking-
        >
        > Rosaleen
        >
        > > Subject: Chiffon instead of noseeum as bug net
        > >
        > > I mentioned this in a previous post. I now have a little more
        > > information.
        > >
        > > It works well to keep all bugs out.
        > >
        > > It stops a little more breeze than the noseeum, but both seem to
        stop
        > > the majority of breeze coming into the hammock.
        > >
        > > Significant problem with the chiffon is that in a saturated
        > > atmosphere (in a cloud, up on a mountain) the chiffon can become
        > > saturated with moisture and feel quite wet. This does not seem
        to be
        > > true of noseeum.
        > >
        > > chiffon seems a little lighter than noseeum.
        > >
        > > So, advantage of weight, but disadvantage of getting wet... For
        > > those who might care to try the stuff out.
        > >
        > > Rick
        > >
        > >
      • amy
        I was thinking about all the sweat/water that ends up in the dimples of my Z-rest under me in my Hennessey. The bottom of the hammock isn t waterproof. If I
        Message 3 of 6 , May 28 8:46 AM
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          I was thinking about all the sweat/water that ends up in the dimples
          of my Z-rest under me in my Hennessey. The bottom of the hammock
          isn't waterproof. If I put some holes in the dimples, the water could
          drain
          and should evaporate off the bottom of the hammock.

          Sound reasonable? Or would holes large enough to do that allow
          enough air movement to make the pad useless?

          -amy
        • Ed Speer
          An interesting idea Amy! I ve also noticed the accumulated water when using a z-rest pad. Not sure if drain holes would work or not, but would be interested
          Message 4 of 6 , May 28 10:49 AM
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            Message
            An interesting idea Amy!  I've also noticed the accumulated water when using a z-rest pad. Not sure if drain holes would work or not, but would be interested to find out.  It would probably take fairly large holes, and as you mentioned, this might ruin the pad's warmth. How would you make the holes?  Burn them in with a hot ice pick or screw driver?  I suspect holes large enough to drain liquid water would have to be 1/16-1/8" diameter and this would defeat the purpose of the traped air space in each dimple.  Instead could you keep the holes very tight by piercing each dimple with a hot paperclip and then place a short piece of wicking yarn thru each one?  However, this may be too much work and the yarn may not stay in place; the wet yarn may also transmit heat away--just thinking out loud...Ed
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: amy [mailto:askowronek@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2003 11:47 AM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Hammock Camping Moisture control in the hammock

            I was thinking about all the sweat/water that ends up in the dimples
            of my Z-rest under me in my Hennessey.  The bottom of the hammock
            isn't waterproof.  If I put some holes in the dimples, the water could
            drain
            and should evaporate off the bottom of the hammock.

            Sound reasonable?  Or would holes large enough to do that allow
            enough air movement to make the pad useless?

            -amy



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          • amy
            ... I ll have to do some testing, obviously. Good idea with the yarn. I have no idea if wet yarn would pump heat out or not. I can think of arguments for
            Message 5 of 6 , May 28 4:23 PM
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              On Wednesday, May 28, 2003, at 01:49 PM, Ed Speer wrote:

              > An interesting idea Amy!  I've also noticed the accumulated water when
              > using a z-rest pad. Not sure if drain holes would work or not, but
              > would be interested to find out.  It would probably take fairly large
              > holes, and as you mentioned, this might ruin the pad's warmth. How
              > would you make the holes?  Burn them in with a hot ice pick or screw
              > driver?  I suspect holes large enough to drain liquid water would have
              > to be 1/16-1/8" diameter and this would defeat the purpose of the
              > traped air space in each dimple.  Instead could you keep the holes
              > very tight by piercing each dimple with a hot paperclip and then place
              > a short piece of wicking yarn thru each one?  However, this may be too
              > much work and the yarn may not stay in place; the wet yarn may also
              > transmit heat away--just thinking out loud...Ed
              >

              I'll have to do some testing, obviously. Good idea with the yarn. I
              have no idea
              if wet yarn would pump heat out or not. I can think of arguments for
              and
              against.

              -amy
            • Rick
              Hi Amy, Another approach is the double bottomed hammock some of us are experimenting with. With a layer of cloth against the skin, the sweat is absorbed by
              Message 6 of 6 , May 30 5:06 PM
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                Hi Amy,

                Another approach is the double bottomed hammock some of us are
                experimenting with. With a layer of cloth against the skin, the
                sweat is absorbed by the cloth and has more of a chance to evaporate.

                Rick

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, amy <askowronek@m...> wrote:
                > I was thinking about all the sweat/water that ends up in the dimples
                > of my Z-rest under me in my Hennessey. The bottom of the hammock
                > isn't waterproof. If I put some holes in the dimples, the water
                could
                > drain
                > and should evaporate off the bottom of the hammock.
                >
                > Sound reasonable? Or would holes large enough to do that allow
                > enough air movement to make the pad useless?
                >
                > -amy
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