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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: cold weather set up

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  • Richard Perlman
    Sorry for the late reply. I m way behind on reading this group. I ve used a 25 x 2 TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the low 20*s and have been
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 3, 2006
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      Sorry for the late reply. I'm way behind on reading this group.

      I've used a 25" x 2" TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the low 20*s
      and have been perfectly warm. I called TR and they said the pad has a R7
      rating.

      The rest of the clothing was medium weight Duofold long underwear, Possum down
      socks, and fleece balaclava. I used a TNF Blue Kazoo (20*) as a quilt on
      top and slept directly on the TR pad.

      This system is awesome, but H E A V Y ! Now that I have a Speer hammock with
      PeaPod and TopBlanket, I'll never sleep on a pad again. I'm totally sold on
      under-the-hammock/around-the-hammock insulation.

      My sleeping kit:
      Speer 8.0A hammock
      Speer 8' x 10' silnylon fly
      Speer PeaPod
      Speer TopBlanket
      HH Explorer UL Asym
      HH Hyperlight
      JRB Shenandoah Summer Quilt/Under Quilt
      TNF Blue Kazoo bag 20*
      Big Agnes Horse Thief bag 35* (top bag, bottom has no insulation)
      Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pullover
      Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pants

      I like HH in summer when bugs are present and Speer in colder temps.

      This "modular" approach allows mixing and matching gear to meet
      the temperature. Being able to use insulated clothing as part of
      my sleep system allows me to use a lighter bag, saving real weight.

      Rich
    • John
      ... low 20*s ... has a R7 ... Possum down ... quilt on ... hammock with ... totally sold on ... temps. ... Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Sorry for the late reply. I'm way behind on reading this group.
        >
        > I've used a 25" x 2" TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the
        low 20*s
        > and have been perfectly warm. I called TR and they said the pad
        has a R7
        > rating.
        >
        > The rest of the clothing was medium weight Duofold long underwear,
        Possum down
        > socks, and fleece balaclava. I used a TNF Blue Kazoo (20*) as a
        quilt on
        > top and slept directly on the TR pad.
        >
        > This system is awesome, but H E A V Y ! Now that I have a Speer
        hammock with
        > PeaPod and TopBlanket, I'll never sleep on a pad again. I'm
        totally sold on
        > under-the-hammock/around-the-hammock insulation.
        >
        > My sleeping kit:
        > Speer 8.0A hammock
        > Speer 8' x 10' silnylon fly
        > Speer PeaPod
        > Speer TopBlanket
        > HH Explorer UL Asym
        > HH Hyperlight
        > JRB Shenandoah Summer Quilt/Under Quilt
        > TNF Blue Kazoo bag 20*
        > Big Agnes Horse Thief bag 35* (top bag, bottom has no insulation)
        > Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pullover
        > Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pants
        >
        > I like HH in summer when bugs are present and Speer in colder
        temps.
        >
        > This "modular" approach allows mixing and matching gear to meet
        > the temperature. Being able to use insulated clothing as part of
        > my sleep system allows me to use a lighter bag, saving real weight.
        >
        > Rich
        >

        Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
        great for me too! All my trips these days are in western Montana
        so, even May thru October, I have to be ready for hard freezes and
        nasty weather. I therefore carry insulated clothing all the time
        and using it for a sleep system gives me double-usage. I use
        Integral Designs' Dolomitti jacket w/hood and Denali pants (since
        replaced by BMW's Cocoon pants). If it's in the middle of summer
        and hard freezes don't look like a realistic possibility I'll leave
        the pants at home. The rest is the typical collection of balaclava,
        fresh wool socks and booties, long underware and fleece mittens. I
        use the 7oz Oware pad and usually clip a light fleece throw to it
        for a total of 21oz for that under insulation. To date, I've only
        used a sleeping bag as a quilt once, all other times I didn't use,
        or need, a top cover/bag. I have added a quilt to extend my range
        but haven't used it in cold weather hammocking yet.

        All this has kept me comfortable to the high-20s which I expected it
        to do. The unanticipated benefit was the late-night Nature
        calls...already dressed including booties, I just drop out of the
        Hennessy, walk to a good tree :) and return. No struggling with
        putting on clothes in the cold, no cold sleeping bag to return to,
        etc. No early morning dressing in the cold, either. I just
        wait 'til temps are 'more comfortable.'

        john
      • dlfrost_1
        ... I ve always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I ve always thought it odd that people don t pay more attention to it. The colder it gets the
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jmgarberson@...> wrote:
          > Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
          > great for me too!

          I've always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I've
          always thought it odd that people don't pay more attention to it. The
          colder it gets the greater the proportion of insulation that must be
          shifted to protective clothing. What's the point of having a
          bombproof cold-weather hammock setup if you freeze yourself numb
          fixing breakfast and packing up?

          Doug Frost
        • tim garner
          i agree. makes sense to me that the clothing that keeps me warm when i`m up, is part of my sleep system. & like you said, makes getting up less of a shock.
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
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            i agree. makes sense to me that the clothing that keeps me warm when i`m up, is part of my sleep system. & like you said, makes getting up less of a shock. ....tim

            dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@...> wrote: --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John" wrote:
            > Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
            > great for me too!

            I've always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I've
            always thought it odd that people don't pay more attention to it. The
            colder it gets the greater the proportion of insulation that must be
            shifted to protective clothing. What's the point of having a
            bombproof cold-weather hammock setup if you freeze yourself numb
            fixing breakfast and packing up?

            Doug Frost







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