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Re: cold weather set up

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  • robert hanlon
    yea i would like to know more, i went camping last weekend and i just about froze! i ended up gettting up at about 2 in the morning, taking my tarp down and
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 29, 2006
      yea i would like to know more, i went camping last weekend and i just
      about froze! i ended up gettting up at about 2 in the morning, taking
      my tarp down and using it as a back pad. that helped. Also, i posted a
      comment a couple weeks ago about keeping the rain out. I tied chords
      to my strings and i got soaked none the less, so i was convieniently
      cold and wet, the whole weekend. Luckily it rained on our first night,
      making sure everything was soaked for the whole trip. oh well, i felt
      like one hell of a trooper for 3 days.
      > >
      > > If anyone would like to see some pics, I can post
      > > some. Let me know.
      >
      > You kiddin?! Pics are always needed!!
      >
      > Never thought about using a Weather Shield with a bag like that. Let
      > us know how it works when you try it.
      >
      > Jeff
      >
    • Nathan Denn
      I currently away from home for a few days and will post some pics as soon as I get back. My hammock is still set up in the back yard minus the sleeping bag!
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 3, 2006
        I currently away from home for a few days and will post some pics as soon as I get back. My hammock is still set up in the back yard minus the sleeping bag! As for adjustment on the bag, it has two places to cinch it up inside. One is around the shoulder and the other is around the midsection. When around the hammock these cinches are above my head and at my shoulder respectively. This really brings it in close to the hammock. Unfortunately when I had the zipper installed in the footbox, I didnt have a double zipper installed. I thought of this much too late.

        Right now I zip it closed as much as possible. The bag is a litttle lop sided but doesnt seem to be a problem. I think I have a way to keep the zipper closed. I will try it out sometime when I get home.

        I emailed the guy from kick ass quilts to see if he could sew me a weather shield similiar to his quilts. I am sure he is uber busy and I havent heard back yet. If not, I think I will try to sew one myself. I few months back I rigged a tarp underneath the hammock taco style and seemed to work well. It is just heavy.

        Pics say a thousand words and this will be true once I get them posted.


        -Nate

        Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountain is going home; that wildness is necessity; that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.
        -John Muir






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      • Richard Perlman
        Sorry for the late reply. I m way behind on reading this group. I ve used a 25 x 2 TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the low 20*s and have been
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 3, 2006
          Sorry for the late reply. I'm way behind on reading this group.

          I've used a 25" x 2" TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the low 20*s
          and have been perfectly warm. I called TR and they said the pad has a R7
          rating.

          The rest of the clothing was medium weight Duofold long underwear, Possum down
          socks, and fleece balaclava. I used a TNF Blue Kazoo (20*) as a quilt on
          top and slept directly on the TR pad.

          This system is awesome, but H E A V Y ! Now that I have a Speer hammock with
          PeaPod and TopBlanket, I'll never sleep on a pad again. I'm totally sold on
          under-the-hammock/around-the-hammock insulation.

          My sleeping kit:
          Speer 8.0A hammock
          Speer 8' x 10' silnylon fly
          Speer PeaPod
          Speer TopBlanket
          HH Explorer UL Asym
          HH Hyperlight
          JRB Shenandoah Summer Quilt/Under Quilt
          TNF Blue Kazoo bag 20*
          Big Agnes Horse Thief bag 35* (top bag, bottom has no insulation)
          Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pullover
          Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pants

          I like HH in summer when bugs are present and Speer in colder temps.

          This "modular" approach allows mixing and matching gear to meet
          the temperature. Being able to use insulated clothing as part of
          my sleep system allows me to use a lighter bag, saving real weight.

          Rich
        • John
          ... low 20*s ... has a R7 ... Possum down ... quilt on ... hammock with ... totally sold on ... temps. ... Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Richard Perlman <richard@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Sorry for the late reply. I'm way behind on reading this group.
            >
            > I've used a 25" x 2" TR in a HH Explorer UL Asym many times to the
            low 20*s
            > and have been perfectly warm. I called TR and they said the pad
            has a R7
            > rating.
            >
            > The rest of the clothing was medium weight Duofold long underwear,
            Possum down
            > socks, and fleece balaclava. I used a TNF Blue Kazoo (20*) as a
            quilt on
            > top and slept directly on the TR pad.
            >
            > This system is awesome, but H E A V Y ! Now that I have a Speer
            hammock with
            > PeaPod and TopBlanket, I'll never sleep on a pad again. I'm
            totally sold on
            > under-the-hammock/around-the-hammock insulation.
            >
            > My sleeping kit:
            > Speer 8.0A hammock
            > Speer 8' x 10' silnylon fly
            > Speer PeaPod
            > Speer TopBlanket
            > HH Explorer UL Asym
            > HH Hyperlight
            > JRB Shenandoah Summer Quilt/Under Quilt
            > TNF Blue Kazoo bag 20*
            > Big Agnes Horse Thief bag 35* (top bag, bottom has no insulation)
            > Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pullover
            > Bozeman Mt. Works Cocoon pants
            >
            > I like HH in summer when bugs are present and Speer in colder
            temps.
            >
            > This "modular" approach allows mixing and matching gear to meet
            > the temperature. Being able to use insulated clothing as part of
            > my sleep system allows me to use a lighter bag, saving real weight.
            >
            > Rich
            >

            Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
            great for me too! All my trips these days are in western Montana
            so, even May thru October, I have to be ready for hard freezes and
            nasty weather. I therefore carry insulated clothing all the time
            and using it for a sleep system gives me double-usage. I use
            Integral Designs' Dolomitti jacket w/hood and Denali pants (since
            replaced by BMW's Cocoon pants). If it's in the middle of summer
            and hard freezes don't look like a realistic possibility I'll leave
            the pants at home. The rest is the typical collection of balaclava,
            fresh wool socks and booties, long underware and fleece mittens. I
            use the 7oz Oware pad and usually clip a light fleece throw to it
            for a total of 21oz for that under insulation. To date, I've only
            used a sleeping bag as a quilt once, all other times I didn't use,
            or need, a top cover/bag. I have added a quilt to extend my range
            but haven't used it in cold weather hammocking yet.

            All this has kept me comfortable to the high-20s which I expected it
            to do. The unanticipated benefit was the late-night Nature
            calls...already dressed including booties, I just drop out of the
            Hennessy, walk to a good tree :) and return. No struggling with
            putting on clothes in the cold, no cold sleeping bag to return to,
            etc. No early morning dressing in the cold, either. I just
            wait 'til temps are 'more comfortable.'

            john
          • dlfrost_1
            ... I ve always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I ve always thought it odd that people don t pay more attention to it. The colder it gets the
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jmgarberson@...> wrote:
              > Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
              > great for me too!

              I've always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I've
              always thought it odd that people don't pay more attention to it. The
              colder it gets the greater the proportion of insulation that must be
              shifted to protective clothing. What's the point of having a
              bombproof cold-weather hammock setup if you freeze yourself numb
              fixing breakfast and packing up?

              Doug Frost
            • tim garner
              i agree. makes sense to me that the clothing that keeps me warm when i`m up, is part of my sleep system. & like you said, makes getting up less of a shock.
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 4, 2006
                i agree. makes sense to me that the clothing that keeps me warm when i`m up, is part of my sleep system. & like you said, makes getting up less of a shock. ....tim

                dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@...> wrote: --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John" wrote:
                > Incorporating insulated clothing into my sleep system has worked out
                > great for me too!

                I've always done this, even before converting to hammocks. I've
                always thought it odd that people don't pay more attention to it. The
                colder it gets the greater the proportion of insulation that must be
                shifted to protective clothing. What's the point of having a
                bombproof cold-weather hammock setup if you freeze yourself numb
                fixing breakfast and packing up?

                Doug Frost







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