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Buying from Wally world

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  • dexstrom
    How do you know you have 1.9oz ripstop when buying at wally world? I ve been checking the local store and the nylon looking stuff always says made from
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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      How do you know you have 1.9oz ripstop when buying at wally world?
      I've been checking the local store and the nylon looking stuff always
      says "made from unknown material, unknown source" Is the ripstop
      labled as "ripstop nylon", and I just have to keep checking the bins
      or is there some other wording that will tell me that it is what I
      want?

      Daniel
      HH Asym
    • Jeff
      What you ll find at Walmart... You kinda have to guess at the weights, but it ll come to you. Search the archives...this topic comes up regularly. Ripstop
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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        What you'll find at Walmart...

        You kinda have to guess at the weights, but it'll come to you.
        Search the archives...this topic comes up regularly.

        Ripstop simply refers to the pattern of squares in the nylon. The
        squares are made from thicker threads that function to...you guessed
        it...stop rips before they get too big. Ripstop may or may not have
        a treatment on it, frays very easily, and you can easily blow
        through it (and so can the wind). It's great for summer hammocks
        and isn't water resistant at all.

        Durable Water Repellent (DWR) is a treatment added to ripstop nylon
        (and other fabrics). It'll usually be shiny, feel slippier, and be
        pretty hard to blow through. It'll still fray. Depending on the
        treatment, it can be very water resistant or not really resistant at
        all. It is breathable, but how breathable depends on the fabric
        weight and treatment. Lots of folks prefer DWR for hammocks,
        windsuits, stuff sacks, quilt and sleeping bag shells, etc.

        Silnylon is very slippery, hardly frays at all when new, and you
        can't blow through it. It's not breathable so condensation can be
        an issue with certain uses (rain gear, hammocks). It's waterproof
        to a certain water pressure depending on fabric weight and
        thickness. Sil is good for tarps, stuff sacks, snakeskins, ponchos,
        etc. Not many hammock models are made from non-breathable materials
        like silnylon.

        Weights given are usually for the fabric before any treatment is
        applied, so 1.1 oz silnylon may actually weigh ~1.3 oz per square
        yard. I've found LOTS of 1.9 oz untreated ripstop, quite a bit of
        1.1 oz DWR (mostly gray/silver), and a bit of 1.9 oz silnylon.

        What kind of HH model do you have? Check the HH website for the
        weight of your fly and use that as a basis for your guesses on
        Walmart's fabric. Or drop the $4 on a sample pack from owfinc.com
        so you'll know for sure.

        Sooo...ripstop describes the fabric itself, DWR and sil are
        treatments added to the ripstop, and the ladies there will probably
        have no idea what the differences are. And don't mind the funny
        looks you'll get for being a guy who ACTUALLY shops in the fabric
        section. :p

        Jeff
      • Bill III
        Hello, I can t say what the stuff is, But I bought two different types. One is a little thicker than the other. It seems to work great. But I need to trim the
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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          Hello, I can't say what the stuff is, But I bought two
          different types. One is a little thicker than the
          other. It seems to work great. But I need to trim the
          length and the width. Anyone have some good starting
          sizes? The thinner nylon? is still waiting for it's
          turn to be tested.


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        • tim garner
          i was blowing through the fabric too (& getting some funny looks from women in the fabric/craft area)... untill ed told me to try taking a breath IN through
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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            i was blowing through the fabric too (& getting some funny looks from women in the fabric/craft area)... untill ed told me to try taking a breath IN through it.
            they both work, but it seams that trying to pull air in through the fabric is a little quicker :~)
            plain untreated... you can breath freely through it.
            DWR... like jeff said it varies, but you`ll probably have to work to get a breath.
            silnylon or waterproofed fabric... like trying to breath w/ plastic over your face.

            Jeff <jwj32542@...> wrote:
            What you'll find at Walmart...

            You kinda have to guess at the weights, but it'll come to you.
            Search the archives...this topic comes up regularly.

            Ripstop simply refers to the pattern of squares in the nylon. The
            squares are made from thicker threads that function to...you guessed
            it...stop rips before they get too big. Ripstop may or may not have
            a treatment on it, frays very easily, and you can easily blow
            through it (and so can the wind). It's great for summer hammocks
            and isn't water resistant at all.

            Durable Water Repellent (DWR) is a treatment added to ripstop nylon
            (and other fabrics). It'll usually be shiny, feel slippier, and be
            pretty hard to blow through. It'll still fray. Depending on the
            treatment, it can be very water resistant or not really resistant at
            all. It is breathable, but how breathable depends on the fabric
            weight and treatment. Lots of folks prefer DWR for hammocks,
            windsuits, stuff sacks, quilt and sleeping bag shells, etc.

            Silnylon is very slippery, hardly frays at all when new, and you
            can't blow through it. It's not breathable so condensation can be
            an issue with certain uses (rain gear, hammocks). It's waterproof
            to a certain water pressure depending on fabric weight and
            thickness. Sil is good for tarps, stuff sacks, snakeskins, ponchos,
            etc. Not many hammock models are made from non-breathable materials
            like silnylon.

            Weights given are usually for the fabric before any treatment is
            applied, so 1.1 oz silnylon may actually weigh ~1.3 oz per square
            yard. I've found LOTS of 1.9 oz untreated ripstop, quite a bit of
            1.1 oz DWR (mostly gray/silver), and a bit of 1.9 oz silnylon.

            What kind of HH model do you have? Check the HH website for the
            weight of your fly and use that as a basis for your guesses on
            Walmart's fabric. Or drop the $4 on a sample pack from owfinc.com
            so you'll know for sure.

            Sooo...ripstop describes the fabric itself, DWR and sil are
            treatments added to the ripstop, and the ladies there will probably
            have no idea what the differences are. And don't mind the funny
            looks you'll get for being a guy who ACTUALLY shops in the fabric
            section. :p

            Jeff







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          • tim garner
            bill... i`d be interrested in hearing the widths & lenghts from more of the people here that have been making & using there own hammocks too... because i`m
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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              bill... i`d be interrested in hearing the widths & lenghts from more of the people here that have been making & using there own hammocks too... because i`m getting ready to make another hammock or two.
              but im leaning pretty heavy towards about 50" wide & 10' long.
              if you`d like to figure the actual weight of that material, ed`s book, "hammock camping" gives a simple method to do that. it`s got lots of helpful information in it.
              ...tim

              Bill III <theocles45@...> wrote:

              Hello, I can't say what the stuff is, But I bought two
              different types. One is a little thicker than the
              other. It seems to work great. But I need to trim the
              length and the width. Anyone have some good starting
              sizes? The thinner nylon? is still waiting for it's
              turn to be tested.


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            • Matthew
              Great post Jeff. Very well described and extremely informative. Oh, and yeah, I ve learned to ignore the funny looks in the fabric section also. :) Matt ...
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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                Great post Jeff. Very well described and extremely informative. Oh,
                and yeah, I've learned to ignore the funny looks in the fabric
                section also. :)

                Matt

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jwj32542@...> wrote:
                >
                > What you'll find at Walmart...
                >
                > You kinda have to guess at the weights, but it'll come to you.
                > Search the archives...this topic comes up regularly.
                >
                > Ripstop simply refers to the pattern of squares in the nylon. The
                > squares are made from thicker threads that function to...you
                guessed
                > it...stop rips before they get too big. Ripstop may or may not
                have
                > a treatment on it, frays very easily, and you can easily blow
                > through it (and so can the wind). It's great for summer hammocks
                > and isn't water resistant at all.
                >
                > Durable Water Repellent (DWR) is a treatment added to ripstop
                nylon
                > (and other fabrics). It'll usually be shiny, feel slippier, and
                be
                > pretty hard to blow through. It'll still fray. Depending on the
                > treatment, it can be very water resistant or not really resistant
                at
                > all. It is breathable, but how breathable depends on the fabric
                > weight and treatment. Lots of folks prefer DWR for hammocks,
                > windsuits, stuff sacks, quilt and sleeping bag shells, etc.
                >
                > Silnylon is very slippery, hardly frays at all when new, and you
                > can't blow through it. It's not breathable so condensation can be
                > an issue with certain uses (rain gear, hammocks). It's waterproof
                > to a certain water pressure depending on fabric weight and
                > thickness. Sil is good for tarps, stuff sacks, snakeskins,
                ponchos,
                > etc. Not many hammock models are made from non-breathable
                materials
                > like silnylon.
                >
                > Weights given are usually for the fabric before any treatment is
                > applied, so 1.1 oz silnylon may actually weigh ~1.3 oz per square
                > yard. I've found LOTS of 1.9 oz untreated ripstop, quite a bit of
                > 1.1 oz DWR (mostly gray/silver), and a bit of 1.9 oz silnylon.
                >
                > What kind of HH model do you have? Check the HH website for the
                > weight of your fly and use that as a basis for your guesses on
                > Walmart's fabric. Or drop the $4 on a sample pack from owfinc.com
                > so you'll know for sure.
                >
                > Sooo...ripstop describes the fabric itself, DWR and sil are
                > treatments added to the ripstop, and the ladies there will
                probably
                > have no idea what the differences are. And don't mind the funny
                > looks you'll get for being a guy who ACTUALLY shops in the fabric
                > section. :p
                >
                > Jeff
                >
              • Ralph Oborn
                but im leaning pretty heavy towards about 50 wide & 10 long. if you`d like to figure the actual weight of that material, ed`s book, hammock camping gives a
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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                  but im leaning pretty heavy towards about 50" wide & 10' long.
                  if you`d like to figure the actual weight of that material, ed`s book,
                  "hammock camping" gives a simple method to do that. it`s got lots of
                  helpful information in it.
                  ...tim


                  I make my risk test hammocks with 4 yards of materiel, I lose about 6 inches
                  on each end for the bight on the double sheetbend. So knot to knot is about
                  11 foot. At this length it doesn't seem to "close in" on you.

                  Ralph (5' 13" tall)


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jeff
                  ... I ve experimented with several different sizes, but I m kinda settling into a starting piece that s 9.5 x 54 . Kinda depends on the material, too - 1.1
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill III <theocles45@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Anyone have some good starting sizes?

                    I've experimented with several different sizes, but I'm kinda settling
                    into a starting piece that's 9.5' x 54". Kinda depends on the
                    material, too - 1.1 oz stretches a lot so smaller sizes aren't as
                    comfortable (shoulder squeeze). 1.9 oz doesn't stretch so much and I
                    find it's more comfortable...worth the extra 2-3 oz for the hammock,
                    IMO.

                    FWIW, I'm 5'10" and currently on the heavy side of 185-200 lbs
                    (hopefully coming down again)...

                    Jeff
                  • tim garner
                    5 13 tall ...how wide... the hammock i mean? ...tim Ralph Oborn wrote: . I make my risk test hammocks with 4 yards of
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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                      5' 13" tall <G> ...how wide... the hammock i mean? ...tim

                      Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@...> wrote: .
                      I make my risk test hammocks with 4 yards of materiel, I lose about 6 inches
                      on each end for the bight on the double sheetbend. So knot to knot is about
                      11 foot. At this length it doesn't seem to "close in" on you.

                      Ralph (5' 13" tall)


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                    • Ralph Oborn
                      ... Either 50 or 60 inches, whatever wally world was selling. When I do NO sewing, I also want to do NO cutting. I use my HH, I make the Risk hammocks for my
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 28, 2006
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                        On 8/28/06, tim garner <slowhike@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > 5' 13" tall <G> ...how wide... the hammock i mean? ...tim



                        Either 50 or 60 inches, whatever wally world was selling.
                        When I do NO sewing, I also want to do NO cutting.

                        I use my HH, I make the Risk hammocks for my scouts.
                        Once we get the kids in them, we'll start discussion weight reduction.


                        Ralph


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Rosaleen Sullivan
                        Daniel- I can t speak for others, but I can t necessarily tell polyester from nylon. Ripstop should be discernable from the grid pattern visible. Weight?
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 29, 2006
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                          Daniel-

                          I can't speak for others, but I can't necessarily tell polyester from nylon. Ripstop should be discernable from the grid pattern visible. Weight? Without a scale, I'd have to guess by heft and experience with other known material. I'm not there, yet.

                          Good luck!

                          Rosaleen

                          Buying from Wally world
                          Posted by: "dexstrom" indyflyer@...<mailto:indyflyer@...> dexstrom
                          Date: Mon Aug 28, 2006 3:45 pm (PDT)

                          How do you know you have 1.9oz ripstop when buying at wally world?
                          I've been checking the local store and the nylon looking stuff always
                          says "made from unknown material, unknown source" Is the ripstop
                          labled as "ripstop nylon", and I just have to keep checking the bins
                          or is there some other wording that will tell me that it is what I
                          want?

                          Daniel
                          HH Asym

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Jeff
                          ... from nylon. That s a good point - I can t either. Is there a difference in how either performs as a hammock? Maybe one is more stretchy or something?
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 29, 2006
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                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rosaleen Sullivan"
                            <rosaleen43@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I can't speak for others, but I can't necessarily tell polyester
                            from nylon.

                            That's a good point - I can't either. Is there a difference in how
                            either performs as a hammock? Maybe one is more stretchy or something?

                            Jeff
                          • Chuck Haak
                            Rosaleen wrote: I can t necessarily tell polyester from nylon My experience is that polyester and nylon act differently when you put a flame to them. Nylon
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 29, 2006
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                              Rosaleen wrote: I can't necessarily tell polyester from nylon





                              My experience is that polyester and nylon act differently when you put a
                              flame to them. Nylon melts while polyester just sort of chars. Not that I
                              would recommend that you light fabric on fire in Walmart.



                              Chuck




                              .


                              <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714&grpId=8969804&grpspId=1600065843&msgId
                              =15566&stime=1156849731&nc1=1&nc2=2&nc3=3>




                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Carey Parks
                              Yes, please don t light the fabric in Wal-Mart! I just went looking for marine emegency flares at my local Wal-Mart (of course everyone has a local Wal-Mart
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 29, 2006
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                                Yes, please don't light the fabric in Wal-Mart! I just went looking for
                                marine emegency flares at my local Wal-Mart (of course everyone has a local
                                Wal-Mart now) and was told they stopped selling them four months ago when a
                                kid lit one off in that store. The whole chain stopped selling them. So,
                                don't light any fabric lest they stop selling it too.

                                Carey

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Chuck Haak
                                Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2006 11:46 AM
                                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Buying from Wally world


                                Rosaleen wrote: I can't necessarily tell polyester from nylon

                                My experience is that polyester and nylon act differently when you put a
                                flame to them. Nylon melts while polyester just sort of chars. Not that I
                                would recommend that you light fabric on fire in Walmart.

                                Chuck

                                .

                                <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714&grpId=8969804&grpspId=1600065843&msg
                                Id
                                =15566&stime=1156849731&nc1=1&nc2=2&nc3=3>


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • dexstrom
                                Thanks for all the information it is a big help. Monday I found some waterproof ripstop nylon in the $1 bin and bought some. Boy is that stuff slippery!
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 5, 2006
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                                  Thanks for all the information it is a big help. Monday I found some
                                  waterproof ripstop nylon in the $1 bin and bought some. Boy is that
                                  stuff slippery! Wife sewed some snake skins with it to practice
                                  sewing nylon.

                                  Yesterday my wife found some ripstop in the $1 bin, and knew how to do
                                  the 'breathing through the fabric' test (not the fire test) to see if
                                  it was suitable for a hammock. Bought enough for a zhammock, which
                                  she sewed up today on her new machine. Glad she bought that new
                                  sewing machine, even sewing a hammock is fun, so far. I like my HH
                                  Expedition but she doesn't like the confined feel and I think she will
                                  like the open hammock, we'll find out this weekend. I promised her a
                                  DAM for the cooler weather ahead.


                                  Daniel



                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Carey Parks" <cjp129@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Yes, please don't light the fabric in Wal-Mart! I just went looking
                                  for
                                  > marine emegency flares at my local Wal-Mart (of course everyone has
                                  a local
                                  > Wal-Mart now) and was told they stopped selling them four months ago
                                  when a
                                  > kid lit one off in that store. The whole chain stopped selling them.
                                  So,
                                  > don't light any fabric lest they stop selling it too.
                                  >
                                  > Carey
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