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Hamocking in the heat...

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  • Amy
    I am considering making a hammock, using either Ed s kit or just the plans from the book. One thing I am thinking about is that a lot of our local hikes are
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 22, 2006
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      I am considering making a hammock, using either Ed's kit or just the
      plans from the book. One thing I am thinking about is that a lot of
      our local hikes are very sun-exposed, especially this time of year. I
      thought it might be nice during the middle of the day to stop and hang
      out (ha, ha, I'm sure that's an old one). Has anyone tried somehow
      fastening a space blanket/mylar to the tarp portion, to block the sun
      and heat? Is this a feasible idea? My initial thought was some kind
      of spray glue to permanently attach the mylar... but my husband
      thought that it would be awfully noisy (probably true)... and would
      the mylar be likely to get damaged?
    • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
      ... From: Amy Date: Thursday, June 22, 2006 1:50 pm Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hamocking in the heat... To:
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 22, 2006
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Amy <sandpiperhiker@...>
        Date: Thursday, June 22, 2006 1:50 pm
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hamocking in the heat...
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

        > I am considering making a hammock, using either Ed's kit or just the
        > plans from the book. One thing I am thinking about is that a lot of
        > our local hikes are very sun-exposed, especially this time of
        > year.

        Amy,
        Although I haven't tried anything reflective over me, I've carried two
        tarps before and set them up one over the other so that there was 4" to
        6" of space in between them. The drop in temperature under the two
        tarps was amazing. I believe it stops a lot of the convection heat
        from being tranfered below the bottom tarp. I know it's more weight
        but I believe that summer in hot areas is a lot like winter in cold
        areas in that you might consider carrying extra weight in order to be
        more comfortable.

        Brian
        T-BACK
      • Rob
        When I use mine in the sun, I string my tarp with the sides higher than when raining. I situate it so the sun is blocked and the breeze can still flow over me.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 23, 2006
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          When I use mine in the sun, I string my tarp with the sides higher than when
          raining. I situate it so the sun is blocked and the breeze can still flow
          over me.

          http://360.yahoo.com/snaresman

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Amy" <sandpiperhiker@...>


          > I am considering making a hammock, using either Ed's kit or just the
          > plans from the book. One thing I am thinking about is that a lot of
          > our local hikes are very sun-exposed, especially this time of year. I
          > thought it might be nice during the middle of the day to stop and hang
          > out (ha, ha, I'm sure that's an old one). Has anyone tried somehow
          > fastening a space blanket/mylar to the tarp portion, to block the sun
          > and heat? Is this a feasible idea? My initial thought was some kind
          > of spray glue to permanently attach the mylar... but my husband
          > thought that it would be awfully noisy (probably true)... and would
          > the mylar be likely to get damaged?
        • Rat
          T-Back s solution works very well, two tarps one above the other. This is how the Darnell Tents we used in Iraq are constructed and it makes a big difference
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 23, 2006
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            T-Back's solution works very well, two tarps one above the other.
            This is how the Darnell Tents we used in Iraq are constructed and it
            makes a big difference in the heat load. Using a mylar blanket as
            the top tarp would be even more effective as well. And it would add
            little if no (if you already carry one) weight at all. I am going to
            try this out this weekend.

            Some other tips for high heat areas:

            Hang in areas that have good airflow. Angle the hammock so that your
            entire body is exposed to the wind not just the feet or head end.

            Hang in low areas. Cold air settles so low lying areas will be
            cooler than higher areas. Also hang the hammock lower to the ground.

            Set up near creeks or rivers. Running water is a natural heat sink
            and the immeadiate area surrounding it will be a few degrees cooler.
            They are usually the low spots as well.

            I use a piece of cord tied to a tree or rock to use to swing myself.
            Usually I can get to sleep while I am swinging (and cool) and stay
            that way after I stop.

            I use a cotton sheet for the really hot days (112* last year on
            Memorial Day). I get it wet and that lay it over me like my quilt,
            get the swing going and it can get downright nice!

            Hammocks may be more trouble in the winter (for the uninformed), but
            they are a million times better in the heat than the floor of a
            tent! :]

            Rat
          • Amy
            Thanks, Rat! I will save this post. How would you tie out a space blanket (and yes, I do already carry one in my emergency kit... although there would go the
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 23, 2006
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              Thanks, Rat! I will save this post. How would you tie out a space
              blanket (and yes, I do already carry one in my emergency kit...
              although there would go the compactness for sure! *lol*)? Small
              pebbles in the corner? Or would the mylar tear too easily?

              Please do let me know how it works out! And thank you both - I
              wouldn't have thought of a double tarp (well, maybe in a few dozen
              years...).


              > T-Back's solution works very well, two tarps one above the other.
              > This is how the Darnell Tents we used in Iraq are constructed and it
              > makes a big difference in the heat load. Using a mylar blanket as
              > the top tarp would be even more effective as well. And it would add
              > little if no (if you already carry one) weight at all. I am going to
              > try this out this weekend.
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