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HH supershelter experiences sought

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  • Brian Lewis
    I recently bought a HH ultralight a-sym and the HH supershelter (undercover + underpad, not the overcover); thus far my massive hammock experience is of
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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      I recently bought a HH ultralight a-sym and the HH supershelter
      (undercover + underpad, not the overcover); thus far my massive
      hammock experience is of sleeping in my backyard a couple of nights.

      I'll be doing a 150 mile stretch of the PCT in August and want to
      minimize potential unhappiness. At one point the trail gets up above
      7000 feet or so; I don't tend to get cold at night but am a little
      concerned after reading backpackgeartest.org reviews. It seems that
      --- having now bought the supershelter (which works fine in my
      backyard :-), I'd like to figure out some in-between approach that
      will keep me warm enough at relatively "upper" elevations, but not be
      so beefy + heavy + expensive as to be winter-proof (i.e., a JRB nest
      or the like).

      I'm thinking of buying a second underpad --- at 5-1/2 more ounces and
      $30 this seems like a reasonable idea. Any experience out there in
      using two underpads? How about just buying open-celled foam and
      making my own second underpad? (for $30 maybe not worth the effort)

      I would hope that two underpads might also be enough cushioning in the
      case I have to pitch the hammock as a ground tent (my fellow hikers
      have conventional tents); I don't want to also bring a traditional
      sleeping pad.

      Another issue is how to store the hammock in my backpack. The HH site
      says this:
      "KEEPING IT ALL TOGETHER Once the Undercover and Underpad are
      installed, I suggest leaving the system on the hammock. This makes
      set-up and break-down a breeze and also protects the somewhat fragile
      pad from damage. I just stuff it all into my pack compressing the foam
      UnderPad a lot if my pack is full or less if there is more room. We
      reccommend lashing all of the attachmenty points so that they cannot
      come loose when collalpsed into your pack."

      I like the idea of keeping it all together (and not using snakeskins
      so I can keep the underpad in place)). What I'm considering is
      getting a couple of light stuff sacks, one for the tarp (which could
      be wet and I thus want to store separately), and another for the
      overall hammock plus supershelter with pad(s?) left in. Good approach?

      There are little loops at the far ends of the hammock; any risk if I
      put and just keep mini-beeners there, to include leaving these there
      when I stuff the hammock at the bottom of my backpack? I figure I can
      store significant stuff in a bag at one or both ends without it
      getting in my way.


      Thanks in advance for feedback on any of the above.


      Brian
    • Scott Macri
      Maybe try a space blanket, bag liner and a think closed-foam pad. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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        Maybe try a space blanket, bag liner and a think closed-foam pad.

        On 6/13/06, Brian Lewis <brianle@...> wrote:
        >
        > I recently bought a HH ultralight a-sym and the HH supershelter
        > (undercover + underpad, not the overcover); thus far my massive
        > hammock experience is of sleeping in my backyard a couple of nights.
        >
        > I'll be doing a 150 mile stretch of the PCT in August and want to
        > minimize potential unhappiness. At one point the trail gets up above
        > 7000 feet or so; I don't tend to get cold at night but am a little
        > concerned after reading backpackgeartest.org reviews. It seems that
        > --- having now bought the supershelter (which works fine in my
        > backyard :-), I'd like to figure out some in-between approach that
        > will keep me warm enough at relatively "upper" elevations, but not be
        > so beefy + heavy + expensive as to be winter-proof (i.e., a JRB nest
        > or the like).
        >
        > I'm thinking of buying a second underpad --- at 5-1/2 more ounces and
        > $30 this seems like a reasonable idea. Any experience out there in
        > using two underpads? How about just buying open-celled foam and
        > making my own second underpad? (for $30 maybe not worth the effort)
        >
        > I would hope that two underpads might also be enough cushioning in the
        > case I have to pitch the hammock as a ground tent (my fellow hikers
        > have conventional tents); I don't want to also bring a traditional
        > sleeping pad.
        >
        > Another issue is how to store the hammock in my backpack. The HH site
        > says this:
        > "KEEPING IT ALL TOGETHER Once the Undercover and Underpad are
        > installed, I suggest leaving the system on the hammock. This makes
        > set-up and break-down a breeze and also protects the somewhat fragile
        > pad from damage. I just stuff it all into my pack compressing the foam
        > UnderPad a lot if my pack is full or less if there is more room. We
        > reccommend lashing all of the attachmenty points so that they cannot
        > come loose when collalpsed into your pack."
        >
        > I like the idea of keeping it all together (and not using snakeskins
        > so I can keep the underpad in place)). What I'm considering is
        > getting a couple of light stuff sacks, one for the tarp (which could
        > be wet and I thus want to store separately), and another for the
        > overall hammock plus supershelter with pad(s?) left in. Good approach?
        >
        > There are little loops at the far ends of the hammock; any risk if I
        > put and just keep mini-beeners there, to include leaving these there
        > when I stuff the hammock at the bottom of my backpack? I figure I can
        > store significant stuff in a bag at one or both ends without it
        > getting in my way.
        >
        > Thanks in advance for feedback on any of the above.
        >
        > Brian
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Stuhr, Tim
        I have the HH Expedition with the SuperShelter. If you get the largest snakeskins you can close up the hammock, undercover and underpad in them, but they are
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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          I have the HH Expedition with the SuperShelter.

          If you get the largest snakeskins you can close up the hammock, undercover and underpad in them, but they are snug. The tarp will need to be stored separately or in another set of snakeskins. You will still need some other pad below you to get down near or at freezing temperatures and I'm not sure another underpad will do it, and it certainly will not offer much comfort or protection on the ground. Each pad is only 1/4" open cell foam so it will compress a lot.

          I slept warm to the high 20's / low 30's with the undercover, underpad, a 3/4 length Thermarest Ultralight pad and a 20 degree down bag. Probably the same size closed cell pad will do about the same as the Thermarest. The extra padding can be put on top of the underpad instead of inside the hammock. I use a 9X9 Kelty tarp on top.

          Tim










          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Bill in Houston
          You could use a ccf pad in the hammock. Not ideal, but simple and inexpensive and useful for groundsleeping or pack stiffening. Bill in Houston ... wrote: At
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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            You could use a ccf pad in the hammock. Not ideal, but simple and
            inexpensive and useful for groundsleeping or pack stiffening.

            Bill in Houston

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@...>
            wrote:
            At one point the trail gets up above
            > 7000 feet or so; I don't tend to get cold at night but am a little
            > concerned after reading backpackgeartest.org reviews. It seems that
            > --- having now bought the supershelter (which works fine in my
            > backyard :-), I'd like to figure out some in-between approach that
            > will keep me warm enough at relatively "upper" elevations, but not be
            > so beefy + heavy + expensive as to be winter-proof (i.e., a JRB nest
            > or the like).
          • Scott Macri
            Sheesh, how much does that setup weigh? ... -- Scott A. Macri www.HikeHaven.com [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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              Sheesh, how much does that setup weigh?

              On 6/13/06, Stuhr, Tim <tstuhr@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have the HH Expedition with the SuperShelter.
              >
              > If you get the largest snakeskins you can close up the hammock, undercover
              > and underpad in them, but they are snug. The tarp will need to be stored
              > separately or in another set of snakeskins. You will still need some other
              > pad below you to get down near or at freezing temperatures and I'm not sure
              > another underpad will do it, and it certainly will not offer much comfort or
              > protection on the ground. Each pad is only 1/4" open cell foam so it will
              > compress a lot.
              >
              > I slept warm to the high 20's / low 30's with the undercover, underpad, a
              > 3/4 length Thermarest Ultralight pad and a 20 degree down bag. Probably the
              > same size closed cell pad will do about the same as the Thermarest. The
              > extra padding can be put on top of the underpad instead of inside the
              > hammock. I use a 9X9 Kelty tarp on top.
              >
              > Tim
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > .
              >
              >
              >



              --
              Scott A. Macri

              www.HikeHaven.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Thomas Vickers
              I have seen the HH with undercover, underpad, and a silver safety blanket keep someone warm down to 26 F in a HH. They had a down bag 30-40 F range and clothes
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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                I have seen the HH with undercover, underpad, and a silver safety
                blanket keep someone warm down to 26 F in a HH.

                They had a down bag 30-40 F range and clothes on, but it was
                comfortable.
                The altitude was between 9,500 and 10,500 feet

                TV
              • André Corterier
                Based on *some* experience with it, I very much doubt that open- celled foam will do much for you by way of insulation when on the ground - particularly if
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 13, 2006
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                  Based on *some* experience with it, I very much doubt that open-
                  celled foam will do much for you by way of insulation when on the
                  ground - particularly if the temps are such that you're going to
                  ground because you get chilled when hanging.
                  For the ground option, you absolutely *need* something which won't
                  compress underneath you. DownAirMat, Big Agnes Insulated Air Core,
                  ccf pads all work - with the ccf pads being the simplest and cheapest
                  option. *Or* you decide that when you see a night coming in which
                  you'll have to go to ground, you start looking for a camp site early
                  on and find one where you can gather a lot of natural insulation
                  (dead leaves and the like) to build a nest. Not necessarily
                  comfortable, but nothing short of a DAM will feel comfortable on the
                  ground once you're used to hammocking.

                  André

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I recently bought a HH ultralight a-sym and the HH supershelter
                  > (undercover + underpad, not the overcover); thus far my massive
                  > hammock experience is of sleeping in my backyard a couple of
                  nights.
                  >
                  > I'll be doing a 150 mile stretch of the PCT in August and want to
                  > minimize potential unhappiness. At one point the trail gets up above
                  > 7000 feet or so; I don't tend to get cold at night but am a little
                  > concerned after reading backpackgeartest.org reviews. It seems
                  that
                  > --- having now bought the supershelter (which works fine in my
                  > backyard :-), I'd like to figure out some in-between approach that
                  > will keep me warm enough at relatively "upper" elevations, but not
                  be
                  > so beefy + heavy + expensive as to be winter-proof (i.e., a JRB nest
                  > or the like).
                  >
                  > I'm thinking of buying a second underpad --- at 5-1/2 more ounces
                  and
                  > $30 this seems like a reasonable idea. Any experience out there in
                  > using two underpads? How about just buying open-celled foam and
                  > making my own second underpad? (for $30 maybe not worth the effort)
                  >
                  > I would hope that two underpads might also be enough cushioning in
                  the
                  > case I have to pitch the hammock as a ground tent (my fellow hikers
                  > have conventional tents); I don't want to also bring a traditional
                  > sleeping pad.
                  >
                  > Another issue is how to store the hammock in my backpack. The HH
                  site
                  > says this:
                  > "KEEPING IT ALL TOGETHER Once the Undercover and Underpad are
                  > installed, I suggest leaving the system on the hammock. This makes
                  > set-up and break-down a breeze and also protects the somewhat
                  fragile
                  > pad from damage. I just stuff it all into my pack compressing the
                  foam
                  > UnderPad a lot if my pack is full or less if there is more room. We
                  > reccommend lashing all of the attachmenty points so that they cannot
                  > come loose when collalpsed into your pack."
                  >
                  > I like the idea of keeping it all together (and not using snakeskins
                  > so I can keep the underpad in place)). What I'm considering is
                  > getting a couple of light stuff sacks, one for the tarp (which could
                  > be wet and I thus want to store separately), and another for the
                  > overall hammock plus supershelter with pad(s?) left in. Good
                  approach?
                  >
                  > There are little loops at the far ends of the hammock; any risk if I
                  > put and just keep mini-beeners there, to include leaving these there
                  > when I stuff the hammock at the bottom of my backpack? I figure I
                  can
                  > store significant stuff in a bag at one or both ends without it
                  > getting in my way.
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks in advance for feedback on any of the above.
                  >
                  >
                  > Brian
                  >
                • Brian Lewis
                  Thanks, André --- it s very helpful getting different perspectives on this stuff, I think *particularly* where we end up making different assumptions (!). I
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jun 14, 2006
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                    Thanks, André --- it's very helpful getting different perspectives on
                    this stuff, I think *particularly* where we end up making different
                    assumptions (!). I wasn't at all thinking of "going to ground" based
                    on temperature, though that's a very logical issue and concern. It's
                    just that until I've backpacked with it a fair bit, I'm not confident
                    that I'll always find two sufficiently strong trees at the requisite
                    distance, not too thick to wrap straps around, sufficiently clear
                    between them of tall brush or other trees. And in a location that's
                    sufficiently close to where my non-hammock fellow party members decide
                    to sleep. I hike in the Pacific Northwest, so that seems laughable in
                    a way, but I guess I'm by nature a bit pessimistic (realistic? <g>).

                    I tried another variation of sleeping in it again last night (as a
                    hammock), so your last comment about "more comfort" really grabbed my
                    attention. Despite the above, the primary attraction for me is the
                    flexibility of finding a camping spot; I'm still not sold on the
                    "comfort" part yet. It can be comfortable for limited periods. After
                    3 different nights, I'm finding that when I sleep on my back
                    (otherwise the most comfortable), after several hours of having my
                    shoulders rounded forward I end up with a sort of minor pulled muscle
                    feeling in between the shoulders near the spine. It seems hard to
                    believe I'm doing something wrong, other than having the musculature
                    and bone structure I'm currently blessed with (yes, I understand the
                    a-sym aspect). Likely this is related to a lifestyle that has me
                    sitting at a computer a lot (which also rounds the shoulders forward).

                    I generally sleep fine on the ground, with just a 3/4 length
                    thermarest prolite 3 (13 oz). I tried adding that to the mix last
                    night; putting it between hammock and undercover was definitely wrong;
                    the fully inflated mattress is stiff, and I think that pushed the
                    overcover out to increase rather than decrease cold spots. I moved it
                    inside the hammock and that seemed to work okay, so maybe I'll accept
                    yet another 13 oz of weight and hopefully be fine for temperature in
                    the air or for cushioning when on the ground.


                    Brian


                    > Based on *some* experience with it, I very much doubt that open-
                    > celled foam will do much for you by way of insulation when on the
                    > ground - particularly if the temps are such that you're going to
                    > ground because you get chilled when hanging.
                    > For the ground option, you absolutely *need* something which won't
                    > compress underneath you. DownAirMat, Big Agnes Insulated Air Core,
                    > ccf pads all work - with the ccf pads being the simplest and cheapest
                    > option. *Or* you decide that when you see a night coming in which
                    > you'll have to go to ground, you start looking for a camp site early
                    > on and find one where you can gather a lot of natural insulation
                    > (dead leaves and the like) to build a nest. Not necessarily
                    > comfortable, but nothing short of a DAM will feel comfortable on the
                    > ground once you're used to hammocking.
                  • Bill in Houston
                    Could you sleep on your side? Would that help? Bill in Houston
                    Message 9 of 16 , Jun 14, 2006
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                      Could you sleep on your side? Would that help?

                      Bill in Houston

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@...>
                      wrote:
                      > I tried another variation of sleeping in it again last night (as a
                      > hammock), so your last comment about "more comfort" really grabbed my
                      > attention. Despite the above, the primary attraction for me is the
                      > flexibility of finding a camping spot; I'm still not sold on the
                      > "comfort" part yet. It can be comfortable for limited periods. After
                      > 3 different nights, I'm finding that when I sleep on my back
                      > (otherwise the most comfortable), after several hours of having my
                      > shoulders rounded forward I end up with a sort of minor pulled muscle
                      > feeling in between the shoulders near the spine.
                    • Brian Lewis
                      Bill asked: Could you sleep on your side? Would that help? Sure, part of the time (I do), but I don t think I d be happy side-sleeping all night --- or even
                      Message 10 of 16 , Jun 14, 2006
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                        Bill asked: "Could you sleep on your side? Would that help?"

                        Sure, part of the time (I do), but I don't think I'd be happy
                        side-sleeping all night --- or even be *able* to sleep all night that
                        way (I suspect I'd shift when not [fully] conscious).

                        Sleeping on my back seems to be the most natural thing in a hammock.
                        Unlike ground (or bed) sleeping, however, it's not so
                        black-and-white, i.e., you can sleep in a position that's partway
                        between "on your back" and "on your side". The more "on my back" I
                        am, I think the more my upper-mid back starts to get sore over time
                        --- based on pretty limited experience.

                        If I stick with this and get the long-term experience some of you "old
                        timer" hammock campers have, maybe I'll eventually figure this out!
                        <grin> In any event, I sure do appreciate the feedback (I'd rather
                        learn from someone *elses* pain and suffering!)


                        Brian
                      • chcoa
                        Hi Brian, As a HH user and SuperShelter tester for Backackgeartest.org, my suggestion to you is to carry an extra section of CLOSED cell foam. If you cut it to
                        Message 11 of 16 , Jun 14, 2006
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                          Hi Brian,

                          As a HH user and SuperShelter tester for Backackgeartest.org, my
                          suggestion to you is to carry an extra section of CLOSED cell foam.
                          If you cut it to 3/4 length, trip the corners, and put a couple of V
                          shapes in the center around your waist area you will save some wait
                          and it will lay better in the hammock.

                          The CCF pad is more versitile than the open cell foam in my
                          opinion. Not only does it provide extra insulation for minimal
                          weight, it can also be used on the ground if you must go there, it
                          makes a nice sit pad around camp, and if not in use you can put it
                          under your hammack as a little foot mat or lay gear on it when your
                          breaking down your setup.

                          It does detract from the comfort of the hammock in my opinion but
                          it's worth having if you need some quick extra warmth. Mine has
                          saved me a couple of times.

                          Jamie in AZ

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > I recently bought a HH ultralight a-sym and the HH supershelter
                          > (undercover + underpad, not the overcover); thus far my massive
                          > hammock experience is of sleeping in my backyard a couple of
                          nights.
                          >
                          > I'll be doing a 150 mile stretch of the PCT in August and want to
                          > minimize potential unhappiness. At one point the trail gets up
                          above
                          > 7000 feet or so; I don't tend to get cold at night but am a little
                          > concerned after reading backpackgeartest.org reviews. It seems
                          that
                          > --- having now bought the supershelter (which works fine in my
                          > backyard :-), I'd like to figure out some in-between approach that
                          > will keep me warm enough at relatively "upper" elevations, but not
                          be
                          > so beefy + heavy + expensive as to be winter-proof (i.e., a JRB
                          nest
                          > or the like).
                          >
                          > I'm thinking of buying a second underpad --- at 5-1/2 more ounces
                          and
                          > $30 this seems like a reasonable idea. Any experience out there in
                          > using two underpads? How about just buying open-celled foam and
                          > making my own second underpad? (for $30 maybe not worth the
                          effort)
                          >
                          > I would hope that two underpads might also be enough cushioning in
                          the
                          > case I have to pitch the hammock as a ground tent (my fellow hikers
                          > have conventional tents); I don't want to also bring a traditional
                          > sleeping pad.
                          >
                          > Another issue is how to store the hammock in my backpack. The HH
                          site
                          > says this:
                          > "KEEPING IT ALL TOGETHER Once the Undercover and Underpad are
                          > installed, I suggest leaving the system on the hammock. This makes
                          > set-up and break-down a breeze and also protects the somewhat
                          fragile
                          > pad from damage. I just stuff it all into my pack compressing the
                          foam
                          > UnderPad a lot if my pack is full or less if there is more room. We
                          > reccommend lashing all of the attachmenty points so that they
                          cannot
                          > come loose when collalpsed into your pack."
                          >
                          > I like the idea of keeping it all together (and not using
                          snakeskins
                          > so I can keep the underpad in place)). What I'm considering is
                          > getting a couple of light stuff sacks, one for the tarp (which
                          could
                          > be wet and I thus want to store separately), and another for the
                          > overall hammock plus supershelter with pad(s?) left in. Good
                          approach?
                          >
                          > There are little loops at the far ends of the hammock; any risk if
                          I
                          > put and just keep mini-beeners there, to include leaving these
                          there
                          > when I stuff the hammock at the bottom of my backpack? I figure I
                          can
                          > store significant stuff in a bag at one or both ends without it
                          > getting in my way.
                          >
                          >
                          > Thanks in advance for feedback on any of the above.
                          >
                          >
                          > Brian
                          >
                        • chcoa
                          Brian, You may already be doing this but it s really helpful to make sure the head end of the hammock is slightly lower than your foot end. This helped me
                          Message 12 of 16 , Jun 14, 2006
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                            Brian,

                            You may already be doing this but it's really helpful to make sure
                            the head end of the hammock is slightly lower than your foot end.
                            This helped me right away nad I was having some of the same types of
                            pains as you mentioned on my first few nights.

                            jamie in az

                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Bill asked: "Could you sleep on your side? Would that help?"
                            >
                            > Sure, part of the time (I do), but I don't think I'd be happy
                            > side-sleeping all night --- or even be *able* to sleep all night
                            that
                            > way (I suspect I'd shift when not [fully] conscious).
                            >
                            > Sleeping on my back seems to be the most natural thing in a
                            hammock.
                            > Unlike ground (or bed) sleeping, however, it's not so
                            > black-and-white, i.e., you can sleep in a position that's partway
                            > between "on your back" and "on your side". The more "on my back"
                            I
                            > am, I think the more my upper-mid back starts to get sore over time
                            > --- based on pretty limited experience.
                            >
                            > If I stick with this and get the long-term experience some of
                            you "old
                            > timer" hammock campers have, maybe I'll eventually figure this
                            out!
                            > <grin> In any event, I sure do appreciate the feedback (I'd
                            rather
                            > learn from someone *elses* pain and suffering!)
                            >
                            >
                            > Brian
                            >
                          • Brian Lewis
                            Jamie said: As a HH user and SuperShelter tester for Backackgeartest.org, my suggestion to you is to carry an extra section of CLOSED cell foam. If you cut it
                            Message 13 of 16 , Jun 15, 2006
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                              Jamie said:
                              "As a HH user and SuperShelter tester for Backackgeartest.org, my
                              suggestion to you is to carry an extra section of CLOSED cell foam.
                              If you cut it to 3/4 length, trip the corners, and put a couple of V
                              shapes in the center around your waist area you will save some wait
                              and it will lay better in the hammock."

                              Thanks, Jamie. In fact, I carry a sit-on sized ccf pad and have long
                              used that to augment my 3/4" light thermarest. What I had not
                              considered --- and you got me looking at (thanks!) is that a 3/4
                              length ccf pad is lighter than my light-weight 3/4 length thermarest
                              (and of course more bullet-proof).

                              Looking at REI's site right now I see that (untrimmed) a basic/simple
                              blue ccf 3/4 pad is 7.5 ounces. There are also the 47" long z-light
                              (egg carton pattern) at 11 ounces or the grey/black "ridge" pattern
                              ccf at 9 ounces for the 47" length version.

                              I'm game (and these are cheap) --- I'll try one out.

                              Even though the lightest, I wonder if the simple/flat blue one is
                              best? I think I've read something about condensation issues with ccf,
                              and I'm thinking particularly about me sleeping directly on it (using
                              my sleeping bag as a blanket). Perhaps the slightly heavier "ridge"
                              model would be better?

                              BTW, from your other message, I switched to hanging my head end a
                              little lower after the first night (when I woke to find my feet
                              distinctly "up hill"). I guess I'll just hope that the sore back
                              thing will go away over time --- or at least be less of a factor after
                              a long day of hiking lets me sleep through anything! <grin>


                              Brian
                            • chcoa
                              Hi Brian, ... ccf, and I m thinking particularly about me sleeping directly on it (using my sleeping bag as a blanket). Perhaps the slightly heavier ridge
                              Message 14 of 16 , Jun 16, 2006
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                                Hi Brian,

                                > Even though the lightest, I wonder if the simple/flat blue one is
                                > best? I think I've read something about condensation issues with
                                ccf, and I'm thinking particularly about me sleeping directly on it
                                (using my sleeping bag as a blanket). Perhaps the slightly
                                heavier "ridge" model would be better?

                                I have experienced some chilling due to condensation, but if youa re
                                wearing the right clothing, this will not much of an issue. In cooler
                                temps where I was wearing fleece or at least a thicker moisture
                                wicking material I did not notice the condensation problems.

                                jamie in az
                              • kbwaddy
                                hey brian, if you are expierencing the same thing i sometimes feel, it may help to use a ccf pad in the hammock. this seems to keep the hammock from squeezing
                                Message 15 of 16 , Jun 16, 2006
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                                  hey brian, if you are expierencing the same thing i sometimes feel, it may help
                                  to use a ccf pad in the hammock. this seems to keep the hammock from
                                  squeezing so much on the sides of your shoulders. it makes the hammock
                                  feel flatter(from side to side, not so much lengthwise). also try throwing one of
                                  your arms up over your head and resting your head on your forarm. this
                                  seems to help too. hope that helps...Brandon



                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bill in Houston" <
                                  zippydooda@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Could you sleep on your side? Would that help?
                                  >
                                  > Bill in Houston
                                  >
                                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Lewis" <brianle@>
                                  > wrote:
                                  > > I tried another variation of sleeping in it again last night (as a
                                  > > hammock), so your last comment about "more comfort" really grabbed my
                                  > > attention. Despite the above, the primary attraction for me is the
                                  > > flexibility of finding a camping spot; I'm still not sold on the
                                  > > "comfort" part yet. It can be comfortable for limited periods. After
                                  > > 3 different nights, I'm finding that when I sleep on my back
                                  > > (otherwise the most comfortable), after several hours of having my
                                  > > shoulders rounded forward I end up with a sort of minor pulled muscle
                                  > > feeling in between the shoulders near the spine.
                                  >
                                • Scott Macri
                                  ... Make sure the hammock is taunt and the trees are the correct distance apart. I noticed if the ropes are not tight, or the trees are too close it feels a
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Jun 16, 2006
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                                    On 6/16/06, kbwaddy <kbwaddy@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > hey brian, if you are expierencing the same thing i sometimes feel, it
                                    > may help
                                    > to use a ccf pad in the hammock. this seems to keep the hammock from
                                    > squeezing so much on the sides of your shoulders. it makes the hammock
                                    > feel flatter(from side to side, not so much lengthwise). also try throwing
                                    > one of
                                    > your arms up over your head and resting your head on your forarm. this
                                    > seems to help too. hope that helps...Brandon
                                    >





                                    Make sure the hammock is taunt and the trees are the correct distance
                                    apart. I noticed if the ropes are not tight, or the trees are too close it
                                    feels a lot different; more uncomfortable.


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