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  • rollerblaz123
    I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth, but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just the stretch issue?
    Message 1 of 8 , May 21, 2006
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      I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth,
      but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just
      the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
      pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a source
      for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i must,
      esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
      thanks!
      mike!
      btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock users.
      and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!
    • RevT
      I m going off memory here because I dont have eds book in front of me, but I think its because its just not strong enough for most people. Brian ... [Non-text
      Message 2 of 8 , May 21, 2006
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        I'm going off memory here because I dont have eds book in front of me, but I
        think its because its just not strong enough for most people.

        Brian

        On 5/21/06, rollerblaz123 <rollerblaz@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth,
        > but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just
        > the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
        > pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a source
        > for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i must,
        > esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
        > thanks!
        > mike!
        > btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock users.
        > and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bill in Houston
        I think that if you weigh just 145, and are really careful getting in and out, watch your elbows and knees and heels, and don t do anything in construction
        Message 3 of 8 , May 22, 2006
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          I think that if you weigh just 145, and are really careful getting in
          and out, watch your elbows and knees and heels, and don't do anything
          in construction that makes a weak sport or stress riser, a hammock of
          1.1 RN could last a while. I would make sure to always have a backup
          plan in mind in case it lets go unexpectedly.

          It's cool how easily you can customize this system for your height and
          weight, huh?

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rollerblaz123" <rollerblaz@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth,
          > but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just
          > the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
          > pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a source
          > for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i
          must,
          > esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
          > thanks!
          > mike!
          > btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock users.
          > and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!
          >
        • Coy
          I ll bet someone has already done the math and probably posted the results here (a long time ago maybe) but I wonder just how much weight you are saving going
          Message 4 of 8 , May 22, 2006
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            I'll bet someone has already done the math and probably posted the
            results here (a long time ago maybe) but I wonder just how much
            weight you are saving going from 1.9 oz to 1.1 oz fabric. about 3
            oz if my quick math is correct. now 3 oz is 3 oz (LOL) but is 3 oz
            really worth fretting over in this case. If it works good for a 145
            lb individual then fine but the 1.9 oz fabric will give you a lot
            more peace of mind. I believe the HH racer used a really light
            nylon for the bottom and the one I saw worked good for a 170 lb guy
            but I did not even attempt to get in it. did not want to buy him a
            new one.

            Coy Boy

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rollerblaz123"
            <rollerblaz@...> wrote:
            >
            > I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in
            depth,
            > but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it
            just
            > the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
            > pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a
            source
            > for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i
            must,
            > esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
            > thanks!
            > mike!
            > btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock
            users.
            > and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!
            >
          • tim garner
            another point that has come to mind latley is the type pad you use. i use one of two air pads; the big agness insulated air core or the exped DAM. and i`m
            Message 5 of 8 , May 22, 2006
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              another point that has come to mind latley is the type pad you use.
              i use one of two air pads; the big agness insulated air core or the exped DAM.
              and i`m carefull about elbows, etc as bill mentioned.
              with a thicker pad like that your weight is much better distributed & you can get by w/ a lighter fabric.

              but of course cody has a good point about how much is 2 or 3 ozs when you increace the chances very much to be "let down". ...tim

              rollerblaz123 <rollerblaz@...> wrote:
              I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth,
              but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just
              the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
              pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a source
              for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i must,
              esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
              thanks!
              mike!
              btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock users.
              and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!






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            • kbwaddy
              has anyone actually had a 1.1 oz hammock fail under normal conditions? i use one and have never had any problems(160lbs.), nor have i been extra careful. i
              Message 6 of 8 , May 23, 2006
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                has anyone actually had a 1.1 oz hammock fail under normal conditions? i
                use one and have never had any problems(160lbs.), nor have i been extra
                careful. i actually got into it once with a tent stake in my back pocket. when i
                pulled myself toward one end i heard it tear. the end of the stake tore a 1 inch
                gash under my rear, but it didn't cause any kind of failure. i sewed on a patch
                and there have been no problems since. i never even realised people
                shunned 1.1 oz fabric. has anyone done any kind of test to see how much
                weight it takes to fail a 1.1 oz hammock? maybe i 'll try that, i've wondered
                about it before.


                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rollerblaz123" <rollerblaz@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > I know this has been gone over before, so no need to replie in depth,
                > but why is 1.1 oz nylon frowned apon for hamomck building? is it just
                > the stretch issue? or is it just a durability issue? im only 145
                > pounds, so im woundering if its just a weight issue. I found a source
                > for pretty cheap nylon, but dont want to spend more money then i must,
                > esp if i want to someday afford an underquilt :D
                > thanks!
                > mike!
                > btw: gossamergear.com has new sized thinlight pads for hammock users.
                > and no im not affiliated with them... though i wish i was!
                >
              • Bill in Houston
                I have a double layer 1.1 oz hammock that developed a hole in one layer while some, umm less coordinated people were using it on a car camping trip. I did not
                Message 7 of 8 , May 23, 2006
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                  I have a double layer 1.1 oz hammock that developed a hole in one
                  layer while some, umm less coordinated people were using it on a car
                  camping trip. I did not see it happen and therefore do not know the
                  exact failure mechanism. It started as a hole in the bottom layer in
                  about the spot where a less coordinated person would think it was
                  good to put her foot while getting in or out. But I'm not sure if it
                  was foot or elbow or switchblade knife that got it started. Once it
                  was started, it eventually spread most of the way across the body of
                  the hammock. If it had been a single layer, I think it would have
                  been a pretty abrupt failure, on the order of 3 to 6 seconds.

                  That said, I sewed it up by making a sizeable overlap and using a
                  large zigzag stitch, and there is no sign of a repeat failure.

                  I think that a new, well-constructed 1.1 oz RN hammock would hold
                  lots and lots of weight if it was smooth and evenly distributed. You
                  could probably easily put 400 lbs of eggs or flour in a hammock. But
                  long-term real world usage would be different.

                  Bill in Houston

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "kbwaddy" <kbwaddy@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > has anyone actually had a 1.1 oz hammock fail under normal
                  conditions? i
                  > use one and have never had any problems(160lbs.), nor have i been
                  extra
                  > careful. i actually got into it once with a tent stake in my back
                  pocket. when i
                  > pulled myself toward one end i heard it tear. the end of the stake
                  tore a 1 inch
                  > gash under my rear, but it didn't cause any kind of failure. i
                  sewed on a patch
                  > and there have been no problems since. i never even realised people
                  > shunned 1.1 oz fabric. has anyone done any kind of test to see how
                  much
                  > weight it takes to fail a 1.1 oz hammock? maybe i 'll try that,
                  i've wondered
                  > about it before.
                • jwj32542
                  ... I think this is how they test bridges before they let traffic cross. Except they hold more than 400 lbs. Jeff
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 23, 2006
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bill in Houston"
                    <zippydooda@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > You could probably easily put 400 lbs of eggs or flour in a hammock.

                    I think this is how they test bridges before they let traffic cross.
                    Except they hold more than 400 lbs.

                    Jeff
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