Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Primaloft pod tested along with partial nudity

Expand Messages
  • David Wills
    It was really cold last night on Trey Mt. It was 38* at 10pm when I went to bed with a strong wind. I would imagine about 35* was the low, as it was about 38
    Message 1 of 5 , May 16, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      It was really cold last night on Trey Mt. It was 38* at 10pm when I
      went to bed with a strong wind. I would imagine about 35* was the
      low, as it was about 38 when i woke. I used a 1.3" primaloft peapod
      looking thing for insulation and was about at its limit.
      I tried to see the difference between clothes and no clothes out of
      curiosity, and wore polartec 200 pants, swim trunks and no shirt. I
      was suprised to find my upper body was a lot warmer than my legs. I
      dont know why it works that way, but it gives me an excuse to bring
      less clothes! I also found 1 midweight capiline doesnt work well in
      near freezing temps by itself. Anyone else got experience with
      sleeping naked?

      -Dave with no trailname
    • jwj32542
      ... I find that if I have a gap between the insulation and hammock, it happens under my legs. That may be the cause for your cold legs, too. Jeff
      Message 2 of 5 , May 16, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
        <little_daddy979@...> wrote:

        > was suprised to find my upper body was a lot warmer than my legs. I
        > dont know why it works that way

        I find that if I have a gap between the insulation and hammock, it
        happens under my legs. That may be the cause for your cold legs, too.

        Jeff
      • Bill in Houston
        For me, my feet always get coldest, no matter what I wear, and I don t have a gap between the insulation and hammock, since I use a ccf pad. I think it is
        Message 3 of 5 , May 16, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          For me, my feet always get coldest, no matter what I wear, and I don't
          have a gap between the insulation and hammock, since I use a ccf pad.
          I think it is caused by a combination of factors.
          -difficulty pumping blood uphill
          -farthest point from your core where heat is generated
          -easy to compress your top insulation and make thin spots at rear end,
          knees, or feet
          -easy for knees or feet to hang off the edge of a pad beneath you

          Definitely don't wear socks that might reduce circulation. I would
          think that fleece pants would help, though.

          A couple of times I have ended up sleeping in a ball just to try to
          get my feet warmer.

          Thanks for posting your results. Good to have that info on insulation
          thickness and temperature.

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
          > <little_daddy979@> wrote:
          >
          > > was suprised to find my upper body was a lot warmer than my legs.
          I
          > > dont know why it works that way
          >
          > I find that if I have a gap between the insulation and hammock, it
          > happens under my legs. That may be the cause for your cold legs,
          too.
          >
          > Jeff
          >
        • Chuck Haak
          Bill in Houston wrote: Definitely don t wear socks that might reduce circulation. Chuck s response: I have made several pair of fleece socks from the Green
          Message 4 of 5 , May 17, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Bill in Houston wrote:
            Definitely don't wear socks that might reduce circulation.

            Chuck's response:
            I have made several pair of fleece socks from the Green Pepper pattern and I
            like them. I don't typically wear them inside of shoes, but I do like them
            for hammock use. The pattern is multi-sized, so you can make them big enough
            that they won't impair circulation. The sewing is a little fussier than some
            other projects because you are sewing about 1/8" away from the edge of the
            fabric rather than the usual nice comfortable 1/2" or 5/8" seam. I would
            recommend that you trace your size onto tracing paper and leave the pattern
            intact for other sizes. You can see the pattern here:

            http://www.thegreenpepper.com/packs.html

            In regard to the partial nudity mentioned in the subject line, my fleece
            socks are probably the last thing I would take off in a hammock. And if
            nudity (partial or otherwise) is going to be a part of your hammocking
            experience, I recommend a supplex hammock. The silk ones I hear about might
            be even better.
          • David Wills
            ... I forgot to mention that I think I sleep really warm and don t mind being cool. -Dave
            Message 5 of 5 , May 17, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              > Thanks for posting your results. Good to have that info on insulation
              > thickness and temperature.
              >
              > Bill in Houston


              I forgot to mention that I think I sleep really warm and don't mind
              being cool.

              -Dave
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.