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RE: Hammock Camping Clark VS other Hammocks

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  • Ed Speer
    Jeff, I understand your requirement of finding a hammock shelter for multiple seasons. I recently hiked 3,200 miles over 7.5 months on the AT with my Speer
    Message 1 of 3 , May 11 2:41 PM
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      Jeff, I understand your requirement of finding a hammock shelter for multiple seasons.  I recently hiked 3,200 miles over 7.5 months on the AT with my Speer Hammock.  In fact, I designed that hammock while on the trail from the ground up--meaning, I specifically designed the hammock to function well on a long distance trip where conditions of all kinds will be encountered.  The removable bug net, the top entry, the large detached rain canopy, and the 2 lb weight are all based on how the hammock should function in multiple field conditions.  The stand-up shelter is unsurpassed every day and especially in the rain; while setting the shelter on the ground as a bivy and tarp is extremely easy and convinent for those few times when trees or cold temps don't cooperate.  Any of the currently available camping hammocks will serve you well in ideal conditions, but when the weather turns nasty and stays that way for days on end, you'll learn the differences.
       
      As for staying warm, all of the hammocks suffer the same from cold bottoms--but there is hope available. The Clark Hammock's bottom pockets are a step in the right direction; yet other solutions, like those mentioned frequently on this List, also offer effective features that may provide more for less.  For instance, my Speer PeaPod, which is a custom-designed sleeping bag that goes completely around an open hammock, offers considerable warmth and flexibility for multiple conditions since it can be used alone or as a component in a multi-gear stay-warm system.  The Jan issue of Hammock Camping News contains a useful article on how to stay warm (free online at: http://www.hammockcamping.com/Newsletters/NEWS.htm 
      My book also contains a seperate chapter on staying warm in a hammock http://www.hammockcamping.com
       
       
      Hammock camping, of course, is such a drastic change from the normal ground camping that on-hands expereince is the best teacher.  Hopefully you will get the chance to try some different hammocks before purchasing for your journey--however most expereinced outdoors persons can easily imagine how a hammock shelter functions in different conditions. It is wise to be cautious and gain experience before taking off into the backwoods.
       
      Will you be at Trail Days this weekend? If so, look me up in the vendor section.
       
      The postings on this List offer the collective experience of many users and can be very useful in your research. Anyone with a base packweight of 16 lbs has certainly been doing a LOT of research--a hammock shelter is definately in your future!
       
      All the best and keep us informed....Ed
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jeff Walters [mailto:trekdogalpha_1999@...]
      Sent: Sunday, May 11, 2003 11:51 AM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Hammock Camping Clark VS other Hammocks

      Hey guys..
      I have been researching options for a sleep system that will work for
      8 1/2 months, give me relativly nice sleepy times, and hold up well.
      I orginally leaned towards the HH, but was put off by all the tricks
      one must do to stay warm in one while tree hanging in cold temps. I
      have to start the hike by March 1st in Delaware if Im to get over the
      Sierras by the third week in October, and if this year is any
      indication, the first two months are going to be rather cold and very
      wet.
      I then took a look at the Europa II tent - light but still on the
      ground, hence back probs on a long hike. So I am back to a hammock
      again. I recently found Clark Hammocks and am very interested in the
      pocket system they have on the Deluxe that creates dead air spaces
      bettewn the inner and outer walls of the hammock. Since money is
      tight (and when isnt it) and I cant afford to test various makes,
      anyone have any experience with Clark Hammocks and can tell me if I
      am making a good choice or not.
      (a note for the inclined: I have my base pack wieght down to approx
      16 pounds)
      Thank in advance for any help..

      ~Jeff - the wanna be tree hanger!



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