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1st hammock

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  • Laurie
    Hi everyone, I am new to the group and have been lurking for the last few weeks. I stumbled upon this group when I was doing some hammock research. I have been
    Message 1 of 5 , May 10, 2003
      Hi everyone,
      I am new to the group and have been lurking for the last few weeks. I
      stumbled upon this group when I was doing some hammock research. I
      have been canoe and kayak camping for years and am starting to get
      into hiking. I am by no means an ultralight fanatic, but there is no
      way I am going to lug my 5lb tent around with me this summer!
      So... I am left with the decision about what hammock to purchase. I
      do not know how to sew, so making my own is not an option. ( I am
      going to start sewing this summer, but start with stuff sacks and
      maybe a tarp). I need a hammock that has the mosquito netting as
      there are a lot of black flies and mosquitos here.
      I would like to stay under the 3lb mark.

      What are your recommendations? Things I should look for when choosing
      my hammock?
    • Shane Steinkamp
      ... If you re going to need the netting all the time, I d recommend the Hennessy. Since it s an integrated solution, you don t need to know much, and the
      Message 2 of 5 , May 10, 2003
        > So... I am left with the decision about what hammock to purchase.
        > I do not know how to sew, so making my own is not an option. ( I
        > am going to start sewing this summer, but start with stuff sacks
        > and maybe a tarp). I need a hammock that has the mosquito netting
        > as there are a lot of black flies and mosquitoes here. I would
        > like to stay under the 3lb mark.

        If you're going to need the netting all the time, I'd recommend the
        Hennessy. Since it's an integrated solution, you don't need to know much,
        and the snakeskins help a lot with setting up and taking down. Of course, a
        Speer would work for you as well. You'll have to decide which features are
        most important to YOU.

        Shane
      • Ed Speer
        Welcome Laurie You can also buy a Speer hammock rather than make one--check out http://www.speerhammocks.com The SH also shines when necessity requires the
        Message 3 of 5 , May 11, 2003
          Message
          Welcome Laurie
           
          You can also buy a Speer hammock rather than make one--check out http://www.speerhammocks.com
          The SH also shines when necessity requires the shelter be set up on the ground--easy to get into and out of, plus plenty of rain canopy to keep you dry in a storm.
           
          Any chance you will be at Trail Days in Damascus, VA this coming weekend? I'll be there showing my hammocks and will have demos out for testing.  Come by if you can...Ed
           

           
          Hi everyone,
          I am new to the group and have been lurking for the last few weeks. I
          stumbled upon this group when I was doing some hammock research. I
          have been canoe and kayak camping for years and am starting to get
          into hiking. I am by no means an ultralight fanatic, but there is no
          way I am going to lug my 5lb tent around with me this summer!
          So... I am left with the decision about what hammock to purchase. I
          do not know how to sew, so making my own is not an option. ( I am
          going to start sewing this summer, but start with stuff sacks and
          maybe a tarp). I need a hammock that has the mosquito netting as
          there are a lot of black flies and mosquitos here.
          I would like to stay under the 3lb mark.

          What are your recommendations? Things I should look for when choosing
          my hammock?



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        • Rick
          Hi Laurie, I also stumbled into hammock camping from canoeing and kayaking. You asked what should you be looking for: My $.02 is here: 1. a way to stay out of
          Message 4 of 5 , May 12, 2003
            Hi Laurie,

            I also stumbled into hammock camping from canoeing and kayaking. You
            asked what should you be looking for:

            My $.02 is here:

            1. a way to stay out of the bugs
            2. a way to stay out of the rain
            3. light weight
            4. a way to stay warm in the cold
            5. a way to not hurt the trees

            Most of the camping hammocks have bug nets either always or as
            needed. Avoid the simple little hammocks meant for a nap in the
            afternoon.

            Be careful with the rain fly/tarp. Some of the rain flys are a
            little to skimpy for my tastes... They work if the rain comes
            straight down, but especially at the ends, could be a little iffy.
            In this I would like to hear Shane's observation... The HH
            asymetrical fly seemed to only barely cover the ends of the
            hammock... I used it only in snow, but had the impression that I was
            looking nearly straight up and seeing stars... Perhaps Shane can
            address this specifically. I know he has been well pleased in
            general with all the HHs and that his native Louisiana is wet enough
            to have given him many rainy nights. How big that tarp should be is
            open to lots of interpretation. I have made tarps as small as 5x10
            feet and as large as 10x10 feet. If I knew it was going to rain
            every day and there were no shelters to sit down occasionally, I
            would opt for the 10x10. For the AT, I will carry a 5x10.

            There are a few very heavy hammocks out there, but most serious
            camping hammocks are generally in the 2 pound range. Absolutely (my
            opinion here) avoid all hammocks made of cotton for real camping.
            They are too heavy, if wet get REALLY heavy, dry as slowly as a pair
            of blue jeans, are prone to getting weaker if they start mildewing.
            Avoid them for the same reasons one avoids hiking in the woods with
            blue jeans in general.

            You will need insulation under the hammock to stay warm, for any
            night below 80 degrees. This may be a pad in the hammock, or a pea-
            pod under insulating sleeping bag, or an air space like the
            various "taco" insulators. Try out what you will use. After
            condiderable experimentation, I am most comfortable with a pad held
            between two layers of fabric in the hammock itself.

            Lastly, you can end up with a hammock held up by ropes or by straps.
            The straps seem to slide less and do less damage to the bark of the
            tree. If you do have a hammock with ropes, I would suggest making a
            strap system like the Hennessey "Tree Hugger" concept. It would work
            with any rope system. Personally, I use Ed Speer's strap system and
            find it works out very well.

            Welcome! Let us know how your experiences go.

            Rick <><
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Laurie" <roocraw4d@h...>
            wrote:
            > Hi everyone,
            > I am new to the group and have been lurking for the last few weeks.
            I
            > stumbled upon this group when I was doing some hammock research. I
            > have been canoe and kayak camping for years and am starting to get
            > into hiking. I am by no means an ultralight fanatic, but there is
            no
            > way I am going to lug my 5lb tent around with me this summer!
            > So... I am left with the decision about what hammock to purchase. I
            > do not know how to sew, so making my own is not an option. ( I am
            > going to start sewing this summer, but start with stuff sacks and
            > maybe a tarp). I need a hammock that has the mosquito netting as
            > there are a lot of black flies and mosquitos here.
            > I would like to stay under the 3lb mark.
            >
            > What are your recommendations? Things I should look for when
            choosing
            > my hammock?
          • Shane
            ... Happy to oblige... The Asym flies are said to be 30% larger. I still haven t figured out 30% larger than WHAT, but I ll ask Tom when I talk to him... The
            Message 5 of 5 , May 12, 2003
              > Some of the rain flys are a little to skimpy for my
              > tastes... They work if the rain comes straight down,
              > but especially at the ends, could be a little iffy.
              > In this I would like to hear Shane's observation...
              > The HH asymetrical fly seemed to only barely cover
              > the ends of the hammock...

              Happy to oblige...

              The Asym flies are said to be 30% larger. I still haven't figured out 30%
              larger than WHAT, but I'll ask Tom when I talk to him... The original HHs
              definitely had flies that were too small. The Asym flies ARE large enough,
              but you have to know how to pitch them properly - and there aren't any
              instructions. Sgt Rock gives really good instructions for this.

              Essentially you have to pull the sides OUT and DOWN really tight first THEN
              tension along the ridge cord. Having the fly properly centered is very
              important. With the fly properly tensioned I do not get wet - even in
              blowing rains.

              I would STILL prefer a larger tarp. Even an additional 6 inches on a side
              would go a LONG way to make me feel better about it. It doesn't NEED to be
              any bigger - but it is at the bare minimum. Really, a few ounces of
              silnylon is a LOT, and I'd prefer to have the extra ounces and be covered.
              The bottom line is that it does work, but it could still be bigger.

              The good news is that HH is coming out with a hexagonal fly that is supposed
              to provide a lot more coverage. I haven't seen one yet, but I hope to soon.

              If I know that the weather is going to be particularly nasty, I pack a 10x10
              tarp like you do. It's nice to have 100 square feet of dry space when the
              rain gods are angry...

              Shane
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