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Re: Speer or Hennessey

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  • Rick
    Hi Chet, Just getting back from a business trip. Shane s response is very complete. I d quibble, however about not being able to sleep on a diagonal... My
    Message 1 of 11 , May 9, 2003
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      Hi Chet,

      Just getting back from a business trip. Shane's response is very
      complete. I'd quibble, however about not being able to sleep on a
      diagonal... My experience is that both work about the same that way,
      each allows sleeping on my side.

      "chetc43537" <cclocksin@a...> wrote:
      > To anyone who has actual experience with BOTH the HH and the Speer
      > hammocks:
      >
      > So......Here are my main questions:
      >
      > 1) In photos of the Speer Hammock, it looks like it is not as roomy
      > as the HH, and appears to really "wrap up" the occupant. Is this
      the
      > case? Or is this just something of an illusion? This is important
      > for me because I am a fairly big (wide) guy.

      I am 6 foot and 190 pounds. A speer type hammock has LOTS of room.
      Fact is, even a speer type hammock made from 4 foot wide material has
      a lot of room too.
      >
      > 2) Do you lie diagonally in the Speer Hammock, relatively flat?

      Yep... covered above. It does seem to matter which material you
      use. Ripstop makes a better pocket for the feet than something more
      stretchy like double knit polyester. Also, pulling up the edges an
      inch or so before making the overhand knot adds to the feeling of a
      pocket for the shoulder and the feet while lying diagonally.
      >
      > 3) Which do you prefer: Bottom entry on the HH, or top entry on the
      > Speer? Why?

      Slight preference for the top opening, because during the mosquitoe
      free day, I like to read in the hammock with a real breeze instead of
      one filtered by bug netting.
      >
      > 4) It seems like it could be diffuclt to open and close the bug net
      > on the Speer while lying in the hammock. Is it?

      It takes about 15 seconds when you use velcro. However if you just
      hang one edge over the edge to seal, like I have mentioned here, it
      is easier and seems to be just as bug tight.
      >
      > I realize that personal preference will vary, and as I said, I am
      > sure both products are fantastic. I am just hoping to get some
      > honest opinions from anybody who has used both styles of hammock.
      >
      I agree with Shane... you likely need to use both hammocks to know
      your real feelings. You are partway down your education, you have
      experience with the HH... Now you have the hope of trying out a
      speer (or CC) hammock.

      Don't be afraid of Ed's kit. If you can sew a hem, you can sew the
      hammock. You will save half the bucks by doing it yourself and will
      enjoying knowing you can make modifications.

      Rick
    • Chester Clocksin
      Rick, thanks for the reply. Sounds like its pretty much unanimous, both styles of hammock have their place depending on the conditions. I am not as confident
      Message 2 of 11 , May 9, 2003
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        Rick, thanks for the reply. Sounds like its pretty much unanimous, both styles of hammock have their place depending on the conditions. I am not as confident as you about the hammock kit, or maybe I'm just lazy  ;)
        I've read many of your postings, and seen some of your handi-work, and after seeing some those hammocks you made (very impressive) I may try making my own hammock. Thanks again.
         
        Chet

        Rick <geoflyfisher@...> wrote:
        Hi Chet,

        Just getting back from a business trip.  Shane's response is very
        complete.  I'd quibble, however about not being able to sleep on a
        diagonal...  My experience is that both work about the same that way,
        each allows sleeping on my side. 

        "chetc43537" <cclocksin@a...> wrote:
        >  To anyone who has actual experience with BOTH the HH and the Speer
        > hammocks:
        >
        > So......Here are my main questions:
        >
        > 1) In photos of the Speer Hammock, it looks like it is not as roomy
        > as the HH, and appears to really "wrap up" the occupant. Is this
        the
        > case? Or is this just something of an illusion? This is important
        > for me because I am a fairly big (wide) guy.

        I am 6 foot and 190 pounds.  A speer type hammock has LOTS of room. 
        Fact is, even a speer type hammock made from 4 foot wide material has
        a lot of room too.
        >
        > 2) Do you lie diagonally in the Speer Hammock, relatively flat?

        Yep... covered above.  It does seem to matter which material you
        use.  Ripstop makes a better pocket for the feet than something more
        stretchy like double knit polyester.  Also, pulling up the edges an
        inch or so before making the overhand knot adds to the feeling of a
        pocket for the shoulder and the feet while lying diagonally.
        >
        > 3) Which do you prefer: Bottom entry on the HH, or top entry on the
        > Speer? Why?

        Slight preference for the top opening, because during the mosquitoe
        free day, I like to read in the hammock with a real breeze instead of
        one filtered by bug netting. 
        >
        > 4) It seems like it could be diffuclt to open and close the bug net
        > on the Speer while lying in the hammock. Is it?

        It takes about 15 seconds when you use velcro.  However if you just
        hang one edge over the edge to seal, like I have mentioned here, it
        is easier and seems to be just as bug tight.
        >
        > I realize that personal preference will vary, and as I said, I am
        > sure both products are fantastic. I am just hoping to get some
        > honest opinions from anybody who has used both styles of hammock.
        >
        I agree with Shane... you likely need to use both hammocks to know
        your real feelings.  You are partway down your education, you have
        experience with the HH...  Now you have the hope of trying out a
        speer (or CC) hammock. 

        Don't be afraid of Ed's kit.  If you can sew a hem, you can sew the
        hammock.  You will save half the bucks by doing it yourself and will
        enjoying knowing you can make modifications. 

        Rick



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      • Shane Steinkamp
        ... Well, that educates me then... I haven t actually been in a Speer, and I was going off what I d seen in the pictures. Thanks! Shane
        Message 3 of 11 , May 9, 2003
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          > Just getting back from a business trip. Shane's response is very
          > complete. I'd quibble, however about not being able to sleep on
          > a diagonal... My experience is that both work about the same
          > that way, each allows sleeping on my side.

          Well, that educates me then... I haven't actually been in a Speer, and I
          was going off what I'd seen in the pictures.

          Thanks!

          Shane
        • Shane Steinkamp
          ... I m terribly sorry that we have led you to this erroneous conclusion, Chester. You do NOT need two hammocks. You need far more than that. Six at least.
          Message 4 of 11 , May 9, 2003
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            > Dave, thanks for the input. Your response, and Shane's, has
            > confirmed my suspicions. I need two hammocks!

            I'm terribly sorry that we have led you to this erroneous conclusion,
            Chester. You do NOT need two hammocks. You need far more than that. Six
            at least. Eight or ten is about right...

            ;)

            Shane
          • Gregg Spoering
            Rick- Could you elaborate a bit about what you are talking about below about pulling up the edges and inch or so ? In his book, Ed says to pull the last 2
            Message 5 of 11 , May 10, 2003
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              Rick-
              Could you elaborate a bit about what you are talking about below about
              "pulling up the edges and inch or so"? In his book, Ed says to "pull the
              last 2 folds 2 inches longer than the previous folds" before tying the
              overhand knot. I thought that possibly if the opposing ends
              (diagonal)were only pulled 1", while the other diagonal was pulled the
              standard 2", it might make diagonal sleeping a bit easier.
              Hope you can figure out what I mean here.
              Best
              Gregg

              From: "Rick" <geoflyfisher@...>

              Rick said:
              Hi Chet,
              >snip<
              Yep... covered above. It does seem to matter which material you
              use. Ripstop makes a better pocket for the feet than something more
              stretchy like double knit polyester. Also, pulling up the edges an
              inch or so before making the overhand knot adds to the feeling of a
              pocket for the shoulder and the feet while lying diagonally.
            • Rick
              ... about ... to pull the ... the ... Hmmm... When I read Ed s book I put in my brain that he wanted to pull up the last fold, not the last 2 folds... Oh
              Message 6 of 11 , May 10, 2003
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                Gregg Spoering wrote:
                > Rick-
                > Could you elaborate a bit about what you are talking about below
                about
                > "pulling up the edges and inch or so"? In his book, Ed says
                to "pull the
                > last 2 folds 2 inches longer than the previous folds" before tying
                the
                > overhand knot.

                Hmmm...

                When I read Ed's book I put in my brain that he wanted to pull up the
                last fold, not the last 2 folds... Oh well. The first fold blends
                into the second fold anyway.

                I pulled up the last fold of both long edges at each end 2 inches on
                my first try at the Speer Hammock, and the effect was to make the
                long edges very tight. I experimented with not pulling them up at
                all and the edge is sort of flacid... I came to the conclusion that
                pulling up about an inch or maybe 3/4 of an inch was right for me.
                That way it is easier to sit in the hammock without feeling the cord-
                like edge cutting into the back of the thighs.

                But if you pull up the last fold or the the last two folds, this
                forms a pocket for the feet that balloons out a bit on each side of
                the midline. Sticking the feet into this little pocket on one side
                or the other is what helps in sleeping flat.

                Rick

                Gregg Spoering <gspoerin@s...> wrote:
                > Rick-
                > Could you elaborate a bit about what you are talking about below
                about
                > "pulling up the edges and inch or so"? In his book, Ed says
                to "pull the
                > last 2 folds 2 inches longer than the previous folds" before tying
                the
                > overhand knot. I thought that possibly if the opposing ends
                > (diagonal)were only pulled 1", while the other diagonal was pulled
                the
                > standard 2", it might make diagonal sleeping a bit easier.
                > Hope you can figure out what I mean here.
                > Best
                > Gregg
                >
                > From: "Rick" <geoflyfisher@y...>
                >
                > Rick said:
                > Hi Chet,
                > >snip<
                > Yep... covered above. It does seem to matter which material you
                > use. Ripstop makes a better pocket for the feet than something more
                > stretchy like double knit polyester. Also, pulling up the edges an
                > inch or so before making the overhand knot adds to the feeling of a
                > pocket for the shoulder and the feet while lying diagonally.
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