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Warm Hammock IV

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  • Rick
    Last night, my poor Diane came down with a cold and I abandoned her and went to my hammock to sleep about 2 AM. The house was down at about 62 degrees. I was
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 23, 2006
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      Last night, my poor Diane came down with a cold and I abandoned her and
      went to my hammock to sleep about 2 AM.

      The house was down at about 62 degrees. I was in WarmHammockIII and
      using my FrogSac as a quilt. I noticed that I got a little chilly on my
      underside. Whoa! I am about to take a week long hike in PA in a
      couple weeks and need to loan one of my other WarmHammocks to a friend
      who will be hiking with me.

      I started to think about that, as I sometimes do in the middle of the
      night. I reached around and the pad of insulation in the Warm Hammock
      was up against me, but the 3/4 inch thick polarguard was compressed to
      about 1/4 inch thick. It was being pulled by the quilting stitches
      holding it from side to side.

      By 530 it was clear that I was losing too much heat through the bottom
      of the hammock to be able to be comfortable in April on the AT.

      That is when WarmHammockIV was born.

      I opened a side seam in the pouch hanging under the hammock about 4
      inches so I could get my hand inside the pouch. I removed the quilt
      tackings that hold the pad of polarguard in place and then slipped the
      insulation out of the small hole.

      Next I began vacuuming the down out of my initial 800 fill down
      WarmHammock as I slowly pulled the tubes of down open. I had filled
      that unworkable version with 4 ounces of good down. I got almost all of
      it out of the prototype and into the sack hanging under my WarmHammock.

      How I do this: I take one of the 14 inch tubes from my shop vac and
      tape a piece of no-see-um cloth over the end of the tube. I then hold
      the suction of the vacuum against the bug netting, sucking down through
      the open end of the 14 inch piece. The down is stopped by the no-see-um
      and slowly plugs up the tube. When suction has diminished a lot, I put
      the open end of the 14 inch tube into the small slit in the side of the
      bag under my hammock and blow like a blow gun against the no-see-um.
      The down is expelled at great force from the tube into the bag under the
      hammock. This is SO MUCH easier than trying to move down with my hand.
      Believe me, I've tried other ways.

      Well, after a good hour of labor, I had rescued the 4 ounces of down and
      sewn up the slit through which I had introduced the down.

      I sewed three small quilting loops in the bottom of the hammock, pulling
      the bottom of the bag up against the hammock. Then I took a little nap.

      It was nice and warm. When I was laying there in the stretched hammock,
      I discovered that the bottom of the bag is only an inch or two away from
      the bottom of the hammock. Down can fill up spaces like that very
      easily, so I cut the quilting loops and tried the hammock again. Even
      better!

      The secret to making this work, like with all my WarmHammocks is to sew
      darts into the patch that is sewn to the bottom of the hammock. These
      darts allow the bag to pouch out and not be stretched against the
      hammock when my weight is in the hammock. It is also important to sew
      the bottom patch on with a zigzag stitch so that the stitching does not
      act as a tearing zipper in the fragile nylon fabric.

      I don't remember who wrote the piece a year ago about a "bag o feathers"
      approach to the WarmHammock, but this result is just about the same as
      the one he/she advocated.

      I weighed my WarmHammockIV, with polypro tube ropes, and with its stuff
      sack, it weighs 17 oz. This makes my back feel good. Like all down
      products, it is best stored open (not compressed) and it is important to
      keep this dry for warmth.

      As some testing proceeds, I will keep the list up to date on how it does.

      Rick
    • jwj32542
      How well does it insulate up the sides, like on your shoulders?
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 23, 2006
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        How well does it insulate up the sides, like on your shoulders?
      • Rick
        ... That is the $64 question. It seems like I can just fluff the down up into the shoulder areas (I had it set up in the sun and could see the down moving
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 23, 2006
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          jwj32542 wrote:
          > How well does it insulate up the sides, like on your shoulders?
          >
          >
          That is the $64 question. It seems like I can just fluff the down up
          into the shoulder areas (I had it set up in the sun and could see the
          down moving around by its shadows.)


          It's going down to 29 F tonight here. I will know more by this time
          tomorrow.

          Oh, and Coy, I need to know the answer to Jeff's question before I put
          it up on the site.

          Rick
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