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Paraline

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  • archidaveture
    I want to lighten my hammock a bit. I have 1 poly straps looped at each end of the fabric (typical homemade hammock) I am considering using Paraline
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 7, 2006
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      I want to lighten my hammock a bit. I have 1" poly straps looped at
      each end of the fabric (typical homemade hammock) I am considering
      using Paraline (parachute cord) to replace the straps from bed
      material to the tree. My local Army-Navy store carries 1/8" diameter
      Paraline, rated at 600 pounds. The hammock would loose about 4-5 feet
      of the poly strapping, I would still use the ploy strap around the
      tree trunk as seperate loops. By doing this the loss of weight would
      probably be minimal, but measurable. I think it would also help in
      making the hammock pack smaller.

      Any down side to this? Other than a few tangles.....

      Thank all

      David
    • jwj32542
      ... Hrm...not if you don t mind being dropped on your butt every now and then. The breaking strength for most paracord is 550 lbs, which is probably sufficient
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 7, 2006
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "archidaveture"
        <archidaveture@...> wrote:
        >
        > I am considering using Paraline (parachute cord) to replace the
        > straps from bed material to the tree.
        >
        > Any down side to this? Other than a few tangles.....

        Hrm...not if you don't mind being dropped on your butt every now and
        then.

        The breaking strength for most paracord is 550 lbs, which is
        probably sufficient except that knots really reduce that amount.
        Mine failed at the knot and dropped me to the ground.

        And the earlier comment about the stretch is correct. Paracord is
        designed to absorb opening shock so it's pretty elastic...polypro
        straps are good because they doesn't stretch much.

        If you find some really light nylon-sheathed Spectra line and tree
        huggers you might be able to cut off .5-1oz, maybe (just a guess).
        I like the convenience of the straps, though...that's what I usually
        carry.

        Youngblood, how much do your ropes weigh?

        Jeff
      • Dave Womble
        ... . ... Jeff, I don t have the numbers with me but I think the 3/8 ropes where about 5 to 6 oz per 25 feet and the 1/4 ropes were about half that amount.
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 7, 2006
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@...> wrote:
          .
          >
          > Youngblood, how much do your ropes weigh?
          >
          > Jeff
          >

          Jeff,

          I don't have the numbers with me but I think the 3/8" ropes where
          about 5 to 6 oz per 25 feet and the 1/4" ropes were about half that
          amount. I currently use the 3/8" ropes because of a couple of reasons-
          - combination of SWL rating, visible degradation over time and less
          likely to mark tree bark. (For the most part I reconsidered what the
          SWL meant and figured I should just use it instead of creating my own
          number. Being a technical person, I would have felt like a dumb arse
          if I broke a rope and hurt myself by exceeding the SWL determined by
          folks that should know more about such things, especially over 2 or 3
          ounces.)

          Dave
        • jwj32542
          ... Sounds very similar to both the webbing and Spectra/huggers setups I have. I could get a bit lighter on the Spectra, but I bought what the kitesurfing
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 7, 2006
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...>
            wrote:

            > I don't have the numbers with me but I think the 3/8" ropes where
            > about 5 to 6 oz per 25 feet

            Sounds very similar to both the webbing and Spectra/huggers setups I
            have. I could get a bit lighter on the Spectra, but I bought what the
            kitesurfing shop had and it's way stronger than I need...about twice
            the size of what's on the HH BP ULA. But even so, I don't think it
            would save more than an ounce.

            Don't blame you for not falling on your arse over 2 ounces! Though it
            would make a good story...something like that bear that took Seuss'
            thumb and threw Coy out of his hammock.
          • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
            ... tangles..... David, That cord is attached to parachutes by being sewed to the canopy. Any knots that are tied reduce the strength of the cord. If you are
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 8, 2006
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              > I want to lighten my hammock a bit. I have 1" poly straps looped at
              > each end of the fabric (typical homemade hammock) I am considering
              > using Paraline (parachute cord) to replace the straps from bed
              > material to the tree. > Any down side to this? Other than a few
              tangles.....


              David,

              That cord is attached to parachutes by being sewed to the canopy. Any
              knots that are tied reduce the strength of the cord. If you are
              lighter than I am this might work for you. I would try to hang close
              to the ground though. Also keep a close eye out for any abrasion from
              tree bark. You won't know if it will work for you unless you try it.
              Good luck with your testing.

              Brian
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