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Re: Condensation

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  • Coy
    I forgot to add. Putting a fleece layer between the body and reflectic or other pad for that matter seems to reduce the condensation or allows it to evaporate
    Message 1 of 10 , May 3, 2003
      I forgot to add. Putting a fleece layer between the body and
      reflectic or other pad for that matter seems to reduce the
      condensation or allows it to evaporate better or a combination of
      both. This can be a flece blanket or fleece clothes. Much like
      cloth seats are cooler than plastic like seats in a car. I know,
      more weight, but in the winter that is a given anyway. Much of last
      winters reaserch team The Ohio gang and Mr Garlington mostly found
      some fairly light solutions but there is more work to be done. Your
      Serria experiances will add knowledge to the mix. We await your
      findings.

      Coy Boy

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
      > Todd
      >
      > Good question. I'm not the scientist on board so I may get
      > corrected. But perhaps what is happening is similar to a glass of
      > ice tea in the summer. The tea is cold inside the glass and the
      > condensation forms outside the glass Dah. Ok not earthbraking
      news.
      > Consider the air on a cold night under the hammock (and pad) the
      > cold tea inside the glass. Now our body on the other side is the
      > warm air outside the glass. Condensation is drawn to the warm
      side.
      >
      > On the ground Our bodies slowly warm the ground under the pad so
      > less condensation builds up on top. Less differance in temps on
      > both sides of the pad I'm guessing is the short answer.
      >
      > Coy Boy
      >
      > -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "upricon" <thomchick@s...>
      > wrote:
      > > Why do pads condensate inside a hammock but not on the ground.
      Is
      > it
      > > because of the reflectix
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bronco372003"
      <hlusk@p...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Hello to everyone, I really enjoy this forum. Great info. I
      > sleep
      > > > in a HH and I made a new sleeping pad last week and tried it
      out
      > > the
      > > > other night. I used a 3/8" closed cell pad 27" x 72" , I made
      > > wings
      > > > from my shoulders to my waist Overall width was 34"(I am broad
      > in
      > > > the shoulders) and I attached a piece or 5/16" Reflectix from
      my
      > > > shoulders to my butt. The temp was about 29 degs F. and
      > snowing. I
      > > > was quite warm all night but in the morning I had some
      > > condensation.
      > > >
    • jlevans7
      Good afternoon, I currently use a couple of overlaping blue, closed cell foam pads as insulation for my HH. I use this during the spring and fall. I notice
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 9, 2004
        Good afternoon,
        I currently use a couple of overlaping blue, closed cell foam pads as
        insulation for my HH. I use this during the spring and fall. I
        notice there is usually some condensation on the pads resulting in
        dampness on the bottom of my sleeping bag in the mornings. Any
        thoughts on prevention of this condensation?

        Jackie
      • Dave Womble
        Jackie, My opinion is that your closed cell foam pads act as a vapor barrier. Since you are most likely staying in pretty much one position all night, it
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 9, 2004
          Jackie,

          My opinion is that your closed cell foam pads act as a vapor
          barrier. Since you are most likely staying in pretty much one
          position all night, it doesn't give your insensible perspiration a
          chance to evaporate like it does when you toss & turn when sleeping
          on the ground. My advice is to try controlling your perspiration.
          One way is to incorporate some wicking fabric against the pads
          (sleeve or wrap). Another way is to try sleeping in different
          positions during the night (back & side). Another way is to wear
          vapor barrier clothing (rain gear). Another approach is to use a
          closed cell foam pad with open cells for the top pad (Zrest,
          Ridgerest, egg crate) and hope the condensation that collects in the
          open cells doesn't wet your bag.

          I suspect that there are many other possible solutions, this web site
          http://chattanooga.net/~cdp/hammock/hammock.htm describes a homemade
          hammock that has sewn-in breathable synthetic insulation in addition
          to a closed cell foam pad (that was in a sleeve). He was still
          getting condensation so he cut many tiny holes in the closed cell
          foam to make it breathable. I don't know if the tiny hole approach
          would work with stacked pads, but it is an idea worth knowing about.

          Youngblood

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jlevans7"
          <jackiethehiker@b...> wrote:
          > Good afternoon,
          > I currently use a couple of overlaping blue, closed cell foam pads
          as
          > insulation for my HH. I use this during the spring and fall. I
          > notice there is usually some condensation on the pads resulting in
          > dampness on the bottom of my sleeping bag in the mornings. Any
          > thoughts on prevention of this condensation?
          >
          > Jackie
        • Risk
          ... Hi Jackie, The closed cell pad is a vapor barrier, so what ever is between me and it will get a little moist. What I do is wear clothing that easily wicks
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 9, 2004
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jlevans7"
            <jackiethehiker@b...> wrote:
            > Good afternoon,
            > I currently use a couple of overlaping blue, closed cell foam pads as
            > insulation for my HH. I use this during the spring and fall. I
            > notice there is usually some condensation on the pads resulting in
            > dampness on the bottom of my sleeping bag in the mornings. Any
            > thoughts on prevention of this condensation?
            >
            > Jackie

            Hi Jackie,

            The closed cell pad is a vapor barrier, so what ever is between me and
            it will get a little moist. What I do is wear clothing that easily
            wicks the moisture and does not feel very wet. I use a coolmax tee
            and nylon shorts. If necessary, I wear a thin fleece pullover and
            pants (or polypropyline long johns).

            I open the bag except for the last couple feet, to use it like a
            quilt, or (better) use a quilt I built. This puts me against the pad
            so the bag's insulation is all doing the job I want it to do. It
            keeps me warm instead of getting wet from my perspiration.

            Perhaps some of these ideas will allow you to experiment on your own
            and find a solution that works well for you.

            Rick
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