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Re: Hammock Material ??

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  • Bill in Houston
    ... pricy! ... was ... be
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 9, 2006
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I just made a double-bottom (ZHammock design) hammock using 1.1oz
      > ripstop that has a DWR finish, and the double-bottom design is great
      > for my *ahem* 225 lbs (gotta do something about that <grin>), so the
      > fabric weight issue can be overcome with a different design.
      >
      > I agree with the others that using silnylon for a hammock would make
      > it uncomfortable, as the fabric needs to breathe. It's also pretty
      pricy!
      >
      > J
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "archidaveture"
      > <archidaveture@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I am considering making my own hammock tent with bug screen and I
      was
      > > wondering if the 1.1 oz Silicone Impregnated Ripstop Nylon would
      be
      > > durable enough to suppport my 6'3" 200lbs frame.
      > >
      >
    • Bill in Houston
      ... pricy! ... was ... be
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 9, 2006
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I just made a double-bottom (ZHammock design) hammock using 1.1oz
        > ripstop that has a DWR finish, and the double-bottom design is great
        > for my *ahem* 225 lbs (gotta do something about that <grin>), so the
        > fabric weight issue can be overcome with a different design.
        >
        > I agree with the others that using silnylon for a hammock would make
        > it uncomfortable, as the fabric needs to breathe. It's also pretty
        pricy!
        >
        > J
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "archidaveture"
        > <archidaveture@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I am considering making my own hammock tent with bug screen and I
        was
        > > wondering if the 1.1 oz Silicone Impregnated Ripstop Nylon would
        be
        > > durable enough to suppport my 6'3" 200lbs frame.
        > >
        >
      • Bill in Houston
        Sorry for the blank post. I think a double layer 1.1 oz is really good... Bill in Houston ... pricy!
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 9, 2006
          Sorry for the blank post.

          I think a double layer 1.1 oz is really good...

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I just made a double-bottom (ZHammock design) hammock using 1.1oz
          > ripstop that has a DWR finish, and the double-bottom design is great
          > for my *ahem* 225 lbs (gotta do something about that <grin>), so the
          > fabric weight issue can be overcome with a different design.
          >
          > I agree with the others that using silnylon for a hammock would make
          > it uncomfortable, as the fabric needs to breathe. It's also pretty
          pricy!
        • gregg
          I made a single thickness silnylon speer style hammock this past fall to see how much I could lighten things up. After about 5 or 6 nights, it is holding up
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 12, 2006
            I made a single thickness silnylon speer style hammock this past fall to
            see how much I could lighten things up. After about 5 or 6 nights, it is
            holding up fine. (I am 195#). My idea was to use it in cooler weather as
            the silnylon would stop air from blowing through (I think Ed says in his
            book that he would treat the hammock bottom for cooler weather, then
            wash it out for warm weather use). I don't really sweat in it, as I have
            only used it in cooler weather, plus I am laying on pads anyway, so I am
            not in direct contact with the fabric.
            Gregg





            > Date: Thu, 09 Feb 2006 18:11:16 -0000
            > From: "jonas4321" <jonas4321@...>
            >Subject: Re: Hammock Material ??
            >
            >I just made a double-bottom (ZHammock design) hammock using 1.1oz
            >ripstop that has a DWR finish, and the double-bottom design is great
            >for my *ahem* 225 lbs (gotta do something about that <grin>), so the
            >fabric weight issue can be overcome with a different design.
            >
            >I agree with the others that using silnylon for a hammock would make
            >it uncomfortable, as the fabric needs to breathe. It's also pretty pricy!
            >
            >J
            >
            >--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "archidaveture"
            ><archidaveture@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >>I am considering making my own hammock tent with bug screen and I was
            >>wondering if the 1.1 oz Silicone Impregnated Ripstop Nylon would be
            >>durable enough to suppport my 6'3" 200lbs frame.
            >>
            >>
            >>



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • tim garner
            gregg wrote: I made a single thickness silnylon speer style hammock this past fall to see how much I could lighten things up.
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 12, 2006
              gregg <gspoerin@...> wrote: I made a single thickness silnylon speer style hammock this past fall to
              see how much I could lighten things up. After about 5 or 6 nights, it is
              holding up fine. (I am 195#). My idea was to use it in cooler weather as
              the silnylon would stop air from blowing through (I think Ed says in his
              book that he would treat the hammock bottom for cooler weather, then
              wash it out for warm weather use). I don't really sweat in it, as I have
              only used it in cooler weather, plus I am laying on pads anyway, so I am
              not in direct contact with the fabric.
              Gregg


              let us know gregg, how the silnylon hammock does as we move into warmer weather. i`ve wondered if a waterproof fabric mite do OK in cold weather, as long as it didn`t begin to close-in on top, trapping to much moister. i`d be courious to know at what temps you begin to feel clamy. thanks...tim


              .
              .

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            • Dave Womble
              Tim, I don t think it is too different than a tent floor. It does enclose the sides some and that is great when it is windy and your insulation is at its lower
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 12, 2006
                Tim,

                I don't think it is too different than a tent floor. It does enclose
                the sides some and that is great when it is windy and your insulation
                is at its lower limits. When it is windy you generally get enough
                air movement to help with any light perspiration you might have,
                especially if you have some wicking fabric to help out and have good
                breathability on the top side. But like most good insulation
                schemes, there are conditions where it works great, conditions where
                it does okay and conditions where it can be a problem and you just
                have to handle it as best you can. The problem condition for that
                situp will be when you have too much insulation, it is very humid and
                there is no wind... this contrasts with a very breathable system
                which works best in those conditions (but can be a problem when you
                have marginal insulation when it is windy and wet). Most of the time
                you will likely be in conditions where it does okay and it will not
                make much difference whether you use the very windproof/waterproof
                approach or the very breathable approach for the hammock. What you
                don't want to do with either approach is to get your insulating layer
                wet to the point that it no longer acts as an efficient insulator,
                especially when you really need the insulation.

                Dave


                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...>
                wrote:
                >
                >
                > let us know gregg, how the silnylon hammock does as we move into
                warmer weather. i`ve wondered if a waterproof fabric mite do OK in
                cold weather, as long as it didn`t begin to close-in on top, trapping
                to much moister. i`d be courious to know at what temps you begin
                to feel clamy. thanks...tim
                >
              • tim garner
                thanks dave. i guess i would need to give more thought to not overheating & alowing for the ventilation needed. i have give thought to making a narrow
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 12, 2006
                  thanks dave. i guess i would need to give more thought to not overheating & alowing for the ventilation needed. i have give thought to making a narrow hammock (like some i`ve already made) but w/ a waterproof bottom. the hammock is just wide enough that it`s low sides still cradle you & give a reasonable feeling of security. but then at the top seam, an additional 8" of breathable material down each side gives additional protection from wind, falling out, etc. that`s how the eagles nest double is made so wide, except the main bottom scetion is beathable as well. the thought w/ the narrow waterproof bottom is that if a person is going to be laying on a pad anyway, it`s not likely to add much of a problem holding body moister. at the same time it will give added protection against blowing rain & splashing. ...tim

                  Dave Womble <dpwomble@...> wrote: Tim,

                  I don't think it is too different than a tent floor. It does enclose
                  the sides some and that is great when it is windy and your insulation
                  is at its lower limits. When it is windy you generally get enough
                  air movement to help with any light perspiration you might have,
                  especially if you have some wicking fabric to help out and have good
                  breathability on the top side. But like most good insulation
                  schemes, there are conditions where it works great, conditions where
                  it does okay and conditions where it can be a problem and you just
                  have to handle it as best you can. The problem condition for that
                  situp will be when you have too much insulation, it is very humid and
                  there is no wind... this contrasts with a very breathable system
                  which works best in those conditions (but can be a problem when you
                  have marginal insulation when it is windy and wet). Most of the time
                  you will likely be in conditions where it does okay and it will not
                  make much difference whether you use the very windproof/waterproof
                  approach or the very breathable approach for the hammock. What you
                  don't want to do with either approach is to get your insulating layer
                  wet to the point that it no longer acts as an efficient insulator,
                  especially when you really need the insulation.

                  Dave


                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, tim garner <slowhike@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > let us know gregg, how the silnylon hammock does as we move into
                  warmer weather. i`ve wondered if a waterproof fabric mite do OK in
                  cold weather, as long as it didn`t begin to close-in on top, trapping
                  to much moister. i`d be courious to know at what temps you begin
                  to feel clamy. thanks...tim
                  >







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                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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                  ---------------------------------





                  tim garner


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                • gregg
                  ... No problem, I ll report as things get warmer- The hammock is made so the sides aren t too high, so I don t think I ll ever get condensation from a closed
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 13, 2006
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2006 16:05:50 -0800 (PST)
                    > From: tim garner <slowhike@...>
                    >Subject: Re: Re: Hammock Material ??
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >gregg <gspoerin@...> wrote: I made a single thickness silnylon speer style hammock this past fall to
                    >see how much I could lighten things up. After about 5 or 6 nights, it is
                    >holding up fine. (I am 195#). My idea was to use it in cooler weather as
                    >the silnylon would stop air from blowing through (I think Ed says in his
                    >book that he would treat the hammock bottom for cooler weather, then
                    >wash it out for warm weather use). I don't really sweat in it, as I have
                    >only used it in cooler weather, plus I am laying on pads anyway, so I am
                    >not in direct contact with the fabric.
                    >Gregg
                    >
                    >
                    > let us know gregg, how the silnylon hammock does as we move into warmer weather. i`ve wondered if a waterproof fabric mite do OK in cold weather, as long as it didn`t begin to close-in on top, trapping to much moister. i`d be courious to know at what temps you begin to feel clamy. thanks...tim
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    No problem, I'll report as things get warmer- The hammock is made so the
                    sides aren't too high, so I don't think I'll ever get condensation from
                    a closed in top-
                    Gregg
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