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Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping dry

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  • seuss910
    Could the straps have been weakened chemically rather than physically? I m thinking specifically about the thin bead of silicone that you applied around the
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 4, 2006
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      Could the straps have been weakened chemically rather than
      physically? I'm thinking specifically about the thin bead of silicone
      that you applied around the disk. Silicone itself is inert but I
      think there's some kind of evaporating solvent mixed in the tubes to
      keep it workable. It's just a thought I'm grabbing at because I
      really don't like the idea of stitching weakening the webbing that
      much.

      -s

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
      >
      > Michael and Jeff,
      >
      > I was worried about my lumbar fusion but it seems to have hurt my
      > pride more than my back. It knocked the wind out of me but at
      least
      > the dog was the only witness! The straps were fairly new as I got
      > them from Ed at the last SEHHA Hangout. I don't believe UV rot was
      to
      > blame. I actually heard the fibers tearing but by the time I
      realized
      > what was happening it was too late. The seam was still intact on
      the
      > cross piece of webbing. The strap pulled apart right at the
      > stitching. For what it's worth, the other side looks ok even under
      > the magnifying glass. I stitch my end loops the same as you do and
      > they appear to be ok. I think I'm going to go back to my rope setup
      > which should solve my water problem also.
      >
      > Brian
      > T-BACK
      >
    • Michael B. Carter
      I haven t had one break yet (I m using rubber disks and silicone w/o stitching anything), but this is an interesting idea. I may test this by putting some
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 4, 2006
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        I haven't had one break yet (I'm using rubber disks and silicone w/o
        stitching anything), but this is an interesting idea. I may test this by
        putting some silicone on a strap w/o stitches and adding weight until it
        breaks (if it does), to see where it breaks. I have some extra webbing
        here to try it with. I'm not sure that the silicone is even necessary with
        the rubber disks, I just haven't tested w/o it yet. It is raining here
        today though :o)

        Michael

        At 05:38 PM 2/4/06 +0000, you wrote:
        >Could the straps have been weakened chemically rather than
        >physically? I'm thinking specifically about the thin bead of silicone
        >that you applied around the disk. Silicone itself is inert but I
        >think there's some kind of evaporating solvent mixed in the tubes to
        >keep it workable. It's just a thought I'm grabbing at because I
        >really don't like the idea of stitching weakening the webbing that
        >much.
        >
        >-s
        >
        >--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
        > >
        > > Michael and Jeff,
        > >
        > > I was worried about my lumbar fusion but it seems to have hurt my
        > > pride more than my back. It knocked the wind out of me but at
        >least
        > > the dog was the only witness! The straps were fairly new as I got
        > > them from Ed at the last SEHHA Hangout. I don't believe UV rot was
        >to
        > > blame. I actually heard the fibers tearing but by the time I
        >realized
        > > what was happening it was too late. The seam was still intact on
        >the
        > > cross piece of webbing. The strap pulled apart right at the
        > > stitching. For what it's worth, the other side looks ok even under
        > > the magnifying glass. I stitch my end loops the same as you do and
        > > they appear to be ok. I think I'm going to go back to my rope setup
        > > which should solve my water problem also.
        > >
        > > Brian
        > > T-BACK
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
        ... From: seuss910 Date: Saturday, February 4, 2006 12:39 pm Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping dry To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 4, 2006
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: seuss910 <wrv77@...>
          Date: Saturday, February 4, 2006 12:39 pm
          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping dry
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

          > Could the straps have been weakened chemically rather than
          > physically? I'm thinking specifically about the thin bead of
          > silicone
          > that you applied around the disk.

          Maybe. I did spray waterproofer on the support strap and the
          waterstop strap. I did not use a bead of silicone near the
          stitching. It seems that it tore apart right at the stitch as if it
          were perforated like paper. I wish I knew why one side failed and the
          other seems ok. The straps were used to the point that they would try
          to roll up instead of hanging flat, which is why I was having the
          water problems to begin with.
          Anyone else have their straps roll up with use?

          Brian
          T-BACK
        • jwj32542
          ... Yes. I use underquilts so that might make a difference, though.
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 4, 2006
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
            > Anyone else have their straps roll up with use?

            Yes. I use underquilts so that might make a difference, though.
          • dlfrost_1
            ... Most likely the needle was cutting/damaging the webbing treads as it sewed the stitch. Then with each use the damaged area weakens until you re suddenly
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 4, 2006
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
              > It seems that it tore apart right at the stitch as if it
              > were perforated like paper.

              Most likely the needle was cutting/damaging the webbing treads as it
              sewed the stitch. Then with each use the damaged area weakens until
              you're suddenly demoted to groundling status.

              Doug Frost
            • Rick
              Brian, You did not use a cutting (leather) needle when sewing that tag on did you? Rick
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                Brian,

                You did not use a cutting (leather) needle when sewing that tag on did you?

                Rick

                > Brian,
                >
                > I hope you didn't get hurt too badly when your hammock failed.
              • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
                ... Rick, I used my sewing machine. I m too lazy to hand stitch anything short of leather if there is electricity nearby. Brian T-BACK
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                  > Brian,
                  >
                  > You did not use a cutting (leather) needle when sewing that tag on
                  > did you?
                  >
                  > Rick

                  Rick,

                  I used my sewing machine. I'm too lazy to hand stitch anything short
                  of leather if there is electricity nearby.

                  Brian
                  T-BACK
                • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
                  ... Doug, I thought at first the needle on the machine might have had a burr on the tip. I looked at it through a magnifying glass but found nothing out of
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                    >
                    > Most likely the needle was cutting/damaging the webbing treads as
                    > it
                    > sewed the stitch. Then with each use the damaged area weakens
                    > until
                    > you're suddenly demoted to groundling status.
                    >
                    > Doug Frost

                    Doug,

                    I thought at first the needle on the machine might have had a burr on
                    the tip. I looked at it through a magnifying glass but found nothing
                    out of the ordinary. The two waterstops were sewn just seconds apart
                    and the other one does not appear to have any damaged fibers.

                    BRIAN
                    T-BACK
                  • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
                    ... Jeff, I m not sure I follow you on how that could roll the straps. I use a peapod but never considered that could cause the rolling. Brian T-BACK
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
                      > > Anyone else have their straps roll up with use?
                      >
                      > Yes. I use underquilts so that might make a difference, though.

                      Jeff,

                      I'm not sure I follow you on how that could roll the straps. I use a
                      peapod but never considered that could cause the rolling.

                      Brian
                      T-BACK
                    • jwj32542
                      ... a ... JRB s underquilts are connected by tightening a shockcord hitch around the hammock support, which necessarily folds the webbing in half, at least.
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, opnheartscrub@... wrote:
                        > I'm not sure I follow you on how that could roll the straps. I use
                        a
                        > peapod but never considered that could cause the rolling.

                        JRB's underquilts are connected by tightening a shockcord hitch around
                        the hammock support, which necessarily folds the webbing in half, at
                        least. Depending on how much I tighten it, that hitch can squeeze the
                        webbing even further.

                        Patrick's KAQ uses a prussik, which has the same effect. A PeaPod is
                        supported by the end of the hammock and doesn't really squeeze the
                        webbing with its weight.

                        However, I don't use underquilts every time, so I'm not sure if the
                        webbing folds are a matter of memory from when I DO use underquilts,
                        or if it's caused just by the kind of loading a hammock subjects it to.

                        Jeff
                      • Rick
                        I understand your use of the machine. But right now, MY sewing machine is set up with a cutting needle, as the last project I had was in sewing some
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 5, 2006
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                          I understand your use of the machine. But right now, MY sewing machine
                          is set up with a cutting needle, as the last project I had was in sewing
                          some naugahide.

                          As I read the thread, I too wondered about the reaction of the solvent
                          in the silicone sealer reacting with the strap.

                          I have done a lot of sewing of straps and never had a failure. It seems
                          it would have to be something else.

                          Rick

                          opnheartscrub@... wrote:
                          >>Brian,
                          >>
                          >>You did not use a cutting (leather) needle when sewing that tag on
                          >>did you?
                          >>
                          >>Rick
                          >
                          >
                          > Rick,
                          >
                          > I used my sewing machine. I'm too lazy to hand stitch anything short
                          > of leather if there is electricity nearby.
                          >
                          > Brian
                          > T-BACK
                          >
                        • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
                          ... I would have to agree with you, I just wish I could figure out what happened. I have sewn new straps in the same manner and used them four nights in a row
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 7, 2006
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                            > I have done a lot of sewing of straps and never had a failure. It
                            > seems
                            > it would have to be something else.
                            >
                            > Rick

                            I would have to agree with you, I just wish I could figure out what
                            happened. I have sewn new straps in the same manner and used them
                            four nights in a row and have had no problems. The solvent does not
                            seem to have weakened them. Maybe there was a defect in the strap
                            itself since one failed while the other shows no sign of stress.
                            Thanks everyone for your input. Hopefully this fall will be my last.

                            Brian
                            T-BACK
                          • David Wills
                            I don t quite understand the need to keep the hammock dry. I have been in a few rain storms in the past couple months with no drip lines at all, much less
                            Message 13 of 18 , Feb 8, 2006
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                              I don't quite understand the need to keep the hammock dry. I have
                              been in a few rain storms in the past couple months with no drip lines
                              at all, much less functional systems, and my hammock predictably gets
                              wet for about 2 feet on each end. It has never even been a nuisance
                              though. I didn't even know it was wet until I put it up, and this was
                              after an 8 hour pounding. I use synthetic insulation, but it doesn't
                              get wet. Has anyone actually had noticable problems with water coming
                              in from the hanging lines, or is it just something that seems like it
                              needs to be taken care of? I could see how waterproof fabrics could
                              be a problem wit hstanding water, but uncoated nylons and silks don't
                              seem like they would be a noticable problem.
                              -David with no trailname
                            • Coy
                              David, I believe the type hanging strap and angle it is hung are big contributers to the problem. If you look at the Hennessy it is easy to see it will have
                              Message 14 of 18 , Feb 8, 2006
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                                David, I believe the type hanging strap and angle it is hung are big
                                contributers to the problem. If you look at the Hennessy it is easy
                                to see it will have less of a problem with water migrating down the
                                lines than a hammock hung with a polypropalyne web strap and at a
                                greater sag angle. That said, I use my Speer like hammock a lot
                                more than my Hennessy, epecially in the winter. I like to look at
                                the stars without a bug net in the way and sit in my hammock without
                                a rope making me lean forward. So far I have not had any real
                                problems getting wet in the Speer but have noticed the ends getting
                                wet like you mention. More rain and I may have gotten wetter.

                                What type hammock are you using?

                                Coy Boy


                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                                <little_daddy979@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I don't quite understand the need to keep the hammock dry. I have
                                > been in a few rain storms in the past couple months with no drip
                                lines
                                > at all, much less functional systems, and my hammock predictably
                                gets
                                > wet for about 2 feet on each end. It has never even been a
                                nuisance
                                > though. I didn't even know it was wet until I put it up, and this
                                was
                                > after an 8 hour pounding. I use synthetic insulation, but it
                                doesn't
                                > get wet. Has anyone actually had noticable problems with water
                                coming
                                > in from the hanging lines, or is it just something that seems like
                                it
                                > needs to be taken care of? I could see how waterproof fabrics
                                could
                                > be a problem wit hstanding water, but uncoated nylons and silks
                                don't
                                > seem like they would be a noticable problem.
                                > -David with no trailname
                                >
                              • opnheartscrub@tampabay.rr.com
                                From: David Wills ... lines ... While I ve never had a water problem with my HH, I realized my homemade Speer-type hammock was
                                Message 15 of 18 , Feb 11, 2006
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                                  From: David Wills <little_daddy979@...>

                                  > I don't quite understand the need to keep the hammock dry. I have
                                  > been in a few rain storms in the past couple months with no drip
                                  lines
                                  > at all, much less functional systems, and my hammock predictably gets
                                  > wet for about 2 feet on each end. It has never even been a nuisance
                                  > though.

                                  While I've never had a water problem with my HH, I realized my
                                  homemade Speer-type hammock was funneling rainwater in when I woke up
                                  in the middle of the night with my butt soaking wet. The hammock was
                                  not holding water but it was letting track down to the lowest point
                                  before it leaked through the fabric. Unfortunately I was using my
                                  peapod as insulation and you can guess what happened, although it only
                                  seemed to get wet in a small area. I believe what you are describing
                                  is wetness from rain blown in under your tarp but my problem comes
                                  from the rolled straps acting as a gutter.

                                  Brian
                                  T-BACK
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