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RE: {Spam?} [Hammock Camping] Winter Snow Protection - Bug Net?

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  • Ed Speer
    Jonas, I ve found that my condensed breath on my bugnet can freeze and may even fall back into the hammock as snow-generally not a serious problem. However,
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 27, 2006
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      Jonas, I've found that my condensed breath on my bugnet can freeze and may
      even fall back into the hammock as snow-generally not a serious problem.
      However, the frozen condensation can re-melt as temps rise after sunup and
      drip annoyingly back into the hammock. Since a bugnet can cause this
      problem, I've also been leery of more vapor-proof fabrics as well...Ed



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      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of jonas4321
      Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 7:27 PM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: {Spam?} [Hammock Camping] Winter Snow Protection - Bug Net?



      Has anyone tried using their noseeum bug net in the winter to help
      keep wind-driven snow off of you and your hammock? I am not suggesting
      doing away with the tarp, but to augment it.

      I had the chance this past weekend to test that theory, but since I
      have a bugnet "tube" and I didn't notice I forgot to put it on until
      after the hammock was hung, and by then I was too durn lazy to untie
      it to add it.

      I am also wondering if moisture from your breath would collect and
      freeze on the inside of the noseeum mesh, too.

      Thoughts? Experiences? Wild baseless theories?

      If this would work, it would save me making a bivy.

      thx







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    • Dave Womble
      I ve had the same experience with bugnets on hammocks where condensation collected, and if it was cold enough it was frozen. I ve also had experiences where
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 27, 2006
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        I've had the same experience with bugnets on hammocks where
        condensation collected, and if it was cold enough it was frozen. I've
        also had experiences where the bugnet came in handy as it significantly
        reduced the effects of pesky cold winds. We all know that conditions
        are not always the same when we camp outdoors, but sometimes we seem to
        forget that and expect out gear or setups to just appropriate handle
        whatever conditions we are in. Something as simple as the wind blowing
        or not can drastically affect the performance or suitability of
        particular gear or a particular setup, particularly in terms of
        condensation issues or the wind robbing you of your warmth. On gear
        that has the flexibility to adjust for conditions, sometimes we set it
        up correctly and in the middle of the night the conditions change...
        whether we make adjustments in the middle of the night often comes down
        to how much trouble it is to make adjustments and whether we fell that
        it is worth the trouble or not.

        Usually the things effecting condensation not are black or white, but
        rather different shades of grey. In those cases it is not as critical
        what you do. However, that is not always the case and it is helpful to
        have some understanding of how various gear or setups can be adjusted
        (or not) to better accommodate different conditions.

        Youngblood


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
        >
        > Jonas, I've found that my condensed breath on my bugnet can freeze
        and may
        > even fall back into the hammock as snow-generally not a serious
        problem.
        > However, the frozen condensation can re-melt as temps rise after
        sunup and
        > drip annoyingly back into the hammock. Since a bugnet can cause this
        > problem, I've also been leery of more vapor-proof fabrics as well...Ed
        >
        >
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