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Winter Hammock fabrics

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  • Ed Speer
    Jeff, your mention of GoreTex for a cold weather replacement for the bugnet is quite possible. It certainly would protect from blowing snow. But, perhaps
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 26, 2006
      Jeff, your mention of GoreTex for a cold weather replacement for the bugnet
      is quite possible. It certainly would protect from blowing snow. But,
      perhaps some other fabric might also work--I've never been satisfied with
      the actual in-the-field function of GoreTex; although I've never tried it on
      my hammock. My experience has been inside condensation indistinguishable
      from the use of full vapor-barrier fabrics. Of course, I know that others
      report better success with GoreTex. In any event, we have at least one List
      member who made a GoreTex bivy hammock and has successfully used it a lot in
      cold temps-maybe Deb W will respond with her experience..Ed



      Moderator, Hammock Camping List
      Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

      Editor, Hammock Camping News

      Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



      _____

      From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of jwj32542
      Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 3:34 PM
      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: {Spam?} [Hammock Camping] Re: Pictures of Winter Setup with
      Warmlite DAM



      Good info that. You should be good for some cold temps. Actually,
      with 4" of loft I don't think you'd need the bottom CCF pad until
      well below zero. Worth trying, anyway. Your side pads make nice
      sit pads on the snow, I bet.

      Snow blowing under the tarp is a unique difficulty for hammockers.
      The tarp doesn't quite cut it. (Actually, most of the tents on the
      Winnemucca trip ended up with spindrift inside...even a true 4
      season tent had problems b/c of a design flaw.)

      I bought an ID Salathe bivy (~60% off at the REI member sale) as
      backup for my next snow trip, but I'm still concerned. First, with
      the 3" thick pad inside the bivy there isn't really enough room for
      the bag to loft if I'm on my side. Could be done if I laid on my
      back, but not as comfortable. Also, the snow blowing in could pile
      up inside the hammock and around the bivy. Still safe since it's
      100% waterproof, I guess, but you can't just shake it off of you
      like a bivy on the ground. Adds about 2 lbs to the setup, too. :(

      I guess the answer is a fully waterproof hammock sock or travel
      pod. I have a few designs puttering around, but I haven't really
      picked a fabric that I'd trust to be fully waterproof, breathable,
      and durable enough to withstand strong winds. Might have to bite
      the bullet and get some GoreTex.

      Ed, how about using your bugnet pattern on some GoreTex and treating
      the body with DWR? The velcro should be strong enough to withstand
      some winds. Sell it as an option in addition to the bugnet and
      it'll be versatile for all seasons.

      Jeff






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    • jwj32542
      ... the bugnet ... But, ... satisfied with ... I agree. I d like to use MP but I can t find a source for a big enough material that doesn t require a bulk
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 26, 2006
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
        >
        > Jeff, your mention of GoreTex for a cold weather replacement for
        the bugnet
        > is quite possible. It certainly would protect from blowing snow.
        But,
        > perhaps some other fabric might also work--I've never been
        satisfied with
        > the actual in-the-field function of GoreTex;

        I agree. I'd like to use MP but I can't find a source for a big
        enough material that doesn't require a bulk order. I'd also be a
        bit concerned about it whipping around in strong winds, but it would
        probably be good enough for most conditions. Certainly worth an
        extra layer of protection, IMO. Maybe even make it double as a
        poncho.

        My biggest concern is venting breath. I like DebW's design because
        it allows that. I think I'd like to have something up on a
        ridgeline, or held up like a bugnet, in case I'm in there for a
        while. That might make the condensation worse, though.

        Anyway - just a thought. I think it would be a useful product, and
        it would fit like a module on your current line.

        Jeff
      • Debra Weisenstein
        I ve only slept in the Goretex bivy a few nights. Condensation was extensive on at least one of those nights. A travelpod or hammock sock of breathable
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 26, 2006
          I've only slept in the Goretex bivy a few nights. Condensation was
          extensive on at least one of those nights. A travelpod or hammock sock
          of breathable material would be just as effective and less prone to
          condensation. It could be made large enough to go over a ridgeline if
          you preferred.

          DebW


          -- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <ed@s...> wrote:
          >
          > Jeff, your mention of GoreTex for a cold weather replacement for the
          bugnet
          > is quite possible. It certainly would protect from blowing snow. But,
          > perhaps some other fabric might also work--I've never been satisfied
          with
          > the actual in-the-field function of GoreTex; although I've never tried it
          on
          > my hammock. My experience has been inside condensation
          indistinguishable
          > from the use of full vapor-barrier fabrics. Of course, I know that others
          > report better success with GoreTex. In any event, we have at least one
          List
          > member who made a GoreTex bivy hammock and has successfully
          used it a lot in
          > cold temps-maybe Deb W will respond with her experience..Ed
          >
          >
        • karens62@aol.com
          You could always use Seuss s method where he replaced the bugnet with a nylon cover and a little window of bug netting so he can still see out. Seuss, you
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 26, 2006
            You could always use Seuss's method where he replaced the bugnet with a nylon cover and a little window of bug netting so he can still see out. Seuss, you can probably describe it better - stop lurking and chime in :)

            Karen

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Ed Speer <ed@...>
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, 26 Jan 2006 15:57:02 -0500
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] Winter Hammock fabrics


            Jeff, your mention of GoreTex for a cold weather replacement for the bugnet
            is quite possible. It certainly would protect from blowing snow. But,
            perhaps some other fabric might also work--I've never been satisfied with
            the actual in-the-field function of GoreTex; although I've never tried it on
            my hammock. My experience has been inside condensation indistinguishable
            from the use of full vapor-barrier fabrics. Of course, I know that others
            report better success with GoreTex. In any event, we have at least one List
            member who made a GoreTex bivy hammock and has successfully used it a lot in
            cold temps-maybe Deb W will respond with her experience..Ed



            Moderator, Hammock Camping List
            Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

            Editor, Hammock Camping News

            Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



            _____

            From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
            On Behalf Of jwj32542
            Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 3:34 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: {Spam?} [Hammock Camping] Re: Pictures of Winter Setup with
            Warmlite DAM



            Good info that. You should be good for some cold temps. Actually,
            with 4" of loft I don't think you'd need the bottom CCF pad until
            well below zero. Worth trying, anyway. Your side pads make nice
            sit pads on the snow, I bet.

            Snow blowing under the tarp is a unique difficulty for hammockers.
            The tarp doesn't quite cut it. (Actually, most of the tents on the
            Winnemucca trip ended up with spindrift inside...even a true 4
            season tent had problems b/c of a design flaw.)

            I bought an ID Salathe bivy (~60% off at the REI member sale) as
            backup for my next snow trip, but I'm still concerned. First, with
            the 3" thick pad inside the bivy there isn't really enough room for
            the bag to loft if I'm on my side. Could be done if I laid on my
            back, but not as comfortable. Also, the snow blowing in could pile
            up inside the hammock and around the bivy. Still safe since it's
            100% waterproof, I guess, but you can't just shake it off of you
            like a bivy on the ground. Adds about 2 lbs to the setup, too. :(

            I guess the answer is a fully waterproof hammock sock or travel
            pod. I have a few designs puttering around, but I haven't really
            picked a fabric that I'd trust to be fully waterproof, breathable,
            and durable enough to withstand strong winds. Might have to bite
            the bullet and get some GoreTex.

            Ed, how about using your bugnet pattern on some GoreTex and treating
            the body with DWR? The velcro should be strong enough to withstand
            some winds. Sell it as an option in addition to the bugnet and
            it'll be versatile for all seasons.

            Jeff






            _____

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            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping> " on the web.

            * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            <mailto:hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>

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            <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.



            _____



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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • seuss910
            Uh...yeah. For cold weather camping I replace the noseeum netting with with a piece of uncoated 3/4 oz. ripstop with the same diamond shape and velcro on the
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 26, 2006
              Uh...yeah. For cold weather camping I replace the noseeum netting
              with with a piece of uncoated 3/4 oz. ripstop with the same diamond
              shape and velcro on the sides. I've sewn a little bugnet window
              (triangular, about 4"x8") roughly over where my head is for
              ventilation, but the fabric is so porous I don't know that it's
              necessary. It's never really been out in the blowing and drifting
              snow so I don't know how well it would protect against spindrift.
              With the sides of the hammock spread apart with a 3-4 foot stick and
              the "hardtop" over a ridgeline, it's like a cozy little tent under
              the fly with temps a good 15 degrees warmer (at least) than outside.
              Nice and cozy for reading a chapter or two before sack time and I've
              never had any issues with condensation come morning.

              Can I go back to lurking now? I've really got nothing evil to say
              about Jeff.

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, karens62@a... wrote:
              >
              > You could always use Seuss's method where he replaced the bugnet
              with a nylon cover and a little window of bug netting so he can still
              see out. Seuss, you can probably describe it better - stop lurking
              and chime in :)
              >
              > Karen
              >
            • tim garner
              if youv`e not got anything evil to say about jeff, you may as well go back to lurking:~) BTW... i forgot to tell this group that one of the high-lights for me
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 27, 2006
                if youv`e not got anything evil to say about jeff, you may as well go back to lurking:~) BTW... i forgot to tell this group that one of the high-lights for me at springer mt was to meet seuss & hear in person the story about how he used a slice of his own thumb to distract a bear that began to chase him & then seuss ran away from camp, in order not to lead the bear into camp & endanger the other hammockers! he suggested there could be a less dramatic version of the story, but i lkie that one. i hope yall appreciate what seuss did for his fellow hammockers! ...tim

                seuss910 <wrv77@...> wrote: Uh...yeah. For cold weather camping I replace the noseeum netting
                with with a piece of uncoated 3/4 oz. ripstop with the same diamond
                shape and velcro on the sides. I've sewn a little bugnet window
                (triangular, about 4"x8") roughly over where my head is for
                ventilation, but the fabric is so porous I don't know that it's
                necessary. It's never really been out in the blowing and drifting
                snow so I don't know how well it would protect against spindrift.
                With the sides of the hammock spread apart with a 3-4 foot stick and
                the "hardtop" over a ridgeline, it's like a cozy little tent under
                the fly with temps a good 15 degrees warmer (at least) than outside.
                Nice and cozy for reading a chapter or two before sack time and I've
                never had any issues with condensation come morning.

                Can I go back to lurking now? I've really got nothing evil to say
                about Jeff.

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, karens62@a... wrote:
                >
                > You could always use Seuss's method where he replaced the bugnet
                with a nylon cover and a little window of bug netting so he can still
                see out. Seuss, you can probably describe it better - stop lurking
                and chime in :)
                >
                > Karen
                >







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                tim garner


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              • J.D. Hoessle
                ... Now, that is cool! Somehow, I have missed seeing/hearing about this idea/concept before... ... ... And, it gets better! No condensation! Condensation,
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 27, 2006
                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "seuss910" <wrv77@y...> wrote:
                  > Uh...yeah. For cold weather camping I replace the noseeum netting
                  > with with a piece of uncoated 3/4 oz. ripstop with the same diamond
                  > shape and velcro on the sides. I've sewn a little bugnet window
                  > (triangular, about 4"x8") roughly over where my head is for
                  > ventilation, but the fabric is so porous I don't know that it's
                  > necessary.

                  Now, that is cool! Somehow, I have missed seeing/hearing about this
                  idea/concept before...
                  ...
                  > the "hardtop" over a ridgeline, it's like a cozy little tent under
                  > the fly with temps a good 15 degrees warmer (at least) than outside.
                  > Nice and cozy for reading a chapter or two before sack time and I've
                  > never had any issues with condensation come morning.
                  ...
                  And, it gets better! No condensation! Condensation, dew, wind-blown
                  rain/snow, some additonal warmth. The *only* draw back is the lack of
                  a full view; but, it's always dark when I crawl in and dark when I get
                  up and struggle to find coffee.

                  Are there pics...? I will go searching...

                  Thanks!

                  Happy Trails,

                  J.D.
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