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Pictures of Winter Setup with Warmlite DAM

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  • jonas4321
    I just uploaded some pics of last weekend s trip to the Adirondacks. I bought a Stephensons Warmlite Down-Filled Air Mattress and made a sleeve / cover with
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 26, 2006
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      I just uploaded some pics of last weekend's trip to the Adirondacks. I
      bought a Stephensons Warmlite Down-Filled Air Mattress and made a
      sleeve / cover with wings, something like a Speer SPE. The sleeve has
      6 "wings", four are 11" high and the two at the foot are 7" high. The
      blue WalMart pad I cut up for the wings is 20" wide and 3/8" thick.
      Inside the sleeve (I hate to steal terms like SPE, so I won't- my
      home-brew sleeve isn't as sophisticated as the Speer device) is my
      Warmlite DAM, and under that is a 1/4" Target CCF pad cut to shape, as
      the DAM is mummy-shaped. The CCF pad is intended to give a little
      extra insulation. The sleeve I made is sewn to exactly fit these two
      devices, and has no stretchy characteristics like the Speer SPE. The
      sleeve is made out of some nylon supplex I had lying around.

      I spent two nights, one at around 32*F, the next somewhere between 10
      and 15*F. I was warm and comfortable both nights with different
      clothes and bag configurations, but one thing is for sure- if I use
      the DAM, I am sleeping on my back with wads of clothes beneath my
      knees. I am normally a side sleeper, but with the 4" thick DAM, riding
      up high on my side is a trick, and I end up leaning forward or
      backward into the CCF wings, which don't offer as much insulation as
      the DAM.

      I had some snow blowing around my tarp and settling on me, so I'll be
      adding a DWR bivy someday. The winds were quite gusty coming off a
      lake about 200 yards away. It's the first time I have felt trees that
      size move, and they jolted me quite frequently.

      The nylon supplex has advantages and disadvantages. It's heavy (2.5
      oz/yd or so), but it's not slippery and stays put against the ripstop
      nylon of my hammock. The wings stayed in the side sleeves both nights
      and only shifted a few inches (I sized them for a tight fit). The
      supplex is wonderful to sleep on, it feels like cotton.

      I hope to make one more night next weekend with this configuration,
      and this time it will be backpacking (this was just outside a cabin).
      It will be interesting to see how all this stuff packs.

      Jonas
    • Coy
      Janas Thats a pretty wide setup you have there. what size DAM did you say you ordered. Also, what size is your tarp. it looks like a 12 x 12 hung
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 26, 2006
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        Janas

        Thats a pretty wide setup you have there. what size DAM did you say
        you ordered. Also, what size is your tarp. it looks like a 12' x 12'
        hung diagonaly? and what do you use the ossol (forget exact name in
        the minute it took to type the above) knot for. I know ever since I
        used Daves (Youngblood) I am looking into getting one. FWIW I really
        did not need any extra insulation on the sides but the low was only 41
        so it was not really a good test. However in the unlikely event you
        had a major DAM break (pun intended) your side pads (rearanges to
        strtigic spots) could make a freezing night into a survivable one.

        Thanks
        Coy Boy


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@j...> wrote:
        >
        > I just uploaded some pics of last weekend's trip to the Adirondacks. I
        > bought a Stephensons Warmlite Down-Filled Air Mattress and made a
        > sleeve / cover with wings, something like a Speer SPE. The sleeve has
        > 6 "wings", four are 11" high and the two at the foot are 7" high. The
        > blue WalMart pad I cut up for the wings is 20" wide and 3/8" thick.
        > Inside the sleeve (I hate to steal terms like SPE, so I won't- my
        > home-brew sleeve isn't as sophisticated as the Speer device) is my
        > Warmlite DAM, and under that is a 1/4" Target CCF pad cut to shape, as
        > the DAM is mummy-shaped. The CCF pad is intended to give a little
        > extra insulation. The sleeve I made is sewn to exactly fit these two
        > devices, and has no stretchy characteristics like the Speer SPE. The
        > sleeve is made out of some nylon supplex I had lying around.
        >
        > I spent two nights, one at around 32*F, the next somewhere between 10
        > and 15*F. I was warm and comfortable both nights with different
        > clothes and bag configurations, but one thing is for sure- if I use
        > the DAM, I am sleeping on my back with wads of clothes beneath my
        > knees. I am normally a side sleeper, but with the 4" thick DAM, riding
        > up high on my side is a trick, and I end up leaning forward or
        > backward into the CCF wings, which don't offer as much insulation as
        > the DAM.
        >
        > I had some snow blowing around my tarp and settling on me, so I'll be
        > adding a DWR bivy someday. The winds were quite gusty coming off a
        > lake about 200 yards away. It's the first time I have felt trees that
        > size move, and they jolted me quite frequently.
        >
        > The nylon supplex has advantages and disadvantages. It's heavy (2.5
        > oz/yd or so), but it's not slippery and stays put against the ripstop
        > nylon of my hammock. The wings stayed in the side sleeves both nights
        > and only shifted a few inches (I sized them for a tight fit). The
        > supplex is wonderful to sleep on, it feels like cotton.
        >
        > I hope to make one more night next weekend with this configuration,
        > and this time it will be backpacking (this was just outside a cabin).
        > It will be interesting to see how all this stuff packs.
        >
        > Jonas
        >
      • jwj32542
        Good info that. You should be good for some cold temps. Actually, with 4 of loft I don t think you d need the bottom CCF pad until well below zero. Worth
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 26, 2006
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          Good info that. You should be good for some cold temps. Actually,
          with 4" of loft I don't think you'd need the bottom CCF pad until
          well below zero. Worth trying, anyway. Your side pads make nice
          sit pads on the snow, I bet.

          Snow blowing under the tarp is a unique difficulty for hammockers.
          The tarp doesn't quite cut it. (Actually, most of the tents on the
          Winnemucca trip ended up with spindrift inside...even a true 4
          season tent had problems b/c of a design flaw.)

          I bought an ID Salathe bivy (~60% off at the REI member sale) as
          backup for my next snow trip, but I'm still concerned. First, with
          the 3" thick pad inside the bivy there isn't really enough room for
          the bag to loft if I'm on my side. Could be done if I laid on my
          back, but not as comfortable. Also, the snow blowing in could pile
          up inside the hammock and around the bivy. Still safe since it's
          100% waterproof, I guess, but you can't just shake it off of you
          like a bivy on the ground. Adds about 2 lbs to the setup, too. :(

          I guess the answer is a fully waterproof hammock sock or travel
          pod. I have a few designs puttering around, but I haven't really
          picked a fabric that I'd trust to be fully waterproof, breathable,
          and durable enough to withstand strong winds. Might have to bite
          the bullet and get some GoreTex.

          Ed, how about using your bugnet pattern on some GoreTex and treating
          the body with DWR? The velcro should be strong enough to withstand
          some winds. Sell it as an option in addition to the bugnet and
          it'll be versatile for all seasons.

          Jeff
        • Coy
          It took awhile but I found your DAM size. It looks/feels rugged, and it is incredibly light for its size (I got their 70 girth model, their largest). It
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 26, 2006
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            It took awhile but I found your DAM size.

            "It looks/feels rugged, and it is incredibly light for its size (I got
            their 70" 'girth' model, their largest). It measures (inflated) 80"
            long, 27" wide at the shoulders, 9" wide at the head, and 18" wide at
            the foot (it's mummy shaped). They claim it weighs 24 oz. with the
            stuff/pump sack."

            Thats the size Dave has.

            you can still answer my other questions.

            Thanks
            Coy Boy


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Janas
            >
            > Thats a pretty wide setup you have there. what size DAM did you say
            > you ordered. Also, what size is your tarp. it looks like a 12' x 12'
            > hung diagonaly? and what do you use the ossol (forget exact name in
            > the minute it took to type the above) knot for. I know ever since I
            > used Daves (Youngblood) I am looking into getting one. FWIW I really
            > did not need any extra insulation on the sides but the low was only 41
            > so it was not really a good test. However in the unlikely event you
            > had a major DAM break (pun intended) your side pads (rearanges to
            > strtigic spots) could make a freezing night into a survivable one.
            >
            > Thanks
            > Coy Boy
            >
            >
            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jonas4321" <jonas4321@j...>
            wrote:
            > >
            > > I just uploaded some pics of last weekend's trip to the Adirondacks. I
            > > bought a Stephensons Warmlite Down-Filled Air Mattress and made a
            > > sleeve / cover with wings, something like a Speer SPE. The sleeve has
            > > 6 "wings", four are 11" high and the two at the foot are 7" high. The
            > > blue WalMart pad I cut up for the wings is 20" wide and 3/8" thick.
            > > Inside the sleeve (I hate to steal terms like SPE, so I won't- my
            > > home-brew sleeve isn't as sophisticated as the Speer device) is my
            > > Warmlite DAM, and under that is a 1/4" Target CCF pad cut to shape, as
            > > the DAM is mummy-shaped. The CCF pad is intended to give a little
            > > extra insulation. The sleeve I made is sewn to exactly fit these two
            > > devices, and has no stretchy characteristics like the Speer SPE. The
            > > sleeve is made out of some nylon supplex I had lying around.
            > >
            > > I spent two nights, one at around 32*F, the next somewhere between 10
            > > and 15*F. I was warm and comfortable both nights with different
            > > clothes and bag configurations, but one thing is for sure- if I use
            > > the DAM, I am sleeping on my back with wads of clothes beneath my
            > > knees. I am normally a side sleeper, but with the 4" thick DAM, riding
            > > up high on my side is a trick, and I end up leaning forward or
            > > backward into the CCF wings, which don't offer as much insulation as
            > > the DAM.
            > >
            > > I had some snow blowing around my tarp and settling on me, so I'll be
            > > adding a DWR bivy someday. The winds were quite gusty coming off a
            > > lake about 200 yards away. It's the first time I have felt trees that
            > > size move, and they jolted me quite frequently.
            > >
            > > The nylon supplex has advantages and disadvantages. It's heavy (2.5
            > > oz/yd or so), but it's not slippery and stays put against the ripstop
            > > nylon of my hammock. The wings stayed in the side sleeves both nights
            > > and only shifted a few inches (I sized them for a tight fit). The
            > > supplex is wonderful to sleep on, it feels like cotton.
            > >
            > > I hope to make one more night next weekend with this configuration,
            > > and this time it will be backpacking (this was just outside a cabin).
            > > It will be interesting to see how all this stuff packs.
            > >
            > > Jonas
            > >
            >
          • jonas4321
            ... The DAM, as you discovered, is their 70 model, 27 wide at the shoulders. The setup looks wider than I think it was while I was in it- in the pics I have
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 26, 2006
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:

              > Thats a pretty wide setup you have there. what size DAM did you say
              > you ordered. Also, what size is your tarp. it looks like a 12' x 12'
              > hung diagonaly? and what do you use the ossol (forget exact name in
              > the minute it took to type the above) knot for. I know ever since I
              > used Daves (Youngblood) I am looking into getting one. FWIW I really
              > did not need any extra insulation on the sides but the low was only 41
              > so it was not really a good test. However in the unlikely event you
              > had a major DAM break (pun intended) your side pads (rearanges to
              > strtigic spots) could make a freezing night into a survivable one.
              >

              The DAM, as you discovered, is their "70" model, 27" wide at the
              shoulders. The setup looks wider than I think it was while I was in
              it- in the pics I have my sleeping bag stuffed loosely into a
              compression sack in the hammock. The CCF pad inside my sleeve makes it
              look wider, too.

              Being kinda wide myself (225lbs, 5'9"), I appreciate whatever width I
              can get <grin>.

              The tarp is a 9' x 12' poly tarp from Wal Mart (still thinking about
              tarps, haven't made one yet - the DAM took me over a year to think
              about, maybe the tarp issue will be shorter?). It is in a diamond
              configuration, which is my preferred method.

              I actually took the tarp ridgeline off the tree and re-tied it to the
              caribiner that is on my tree hugger strap, so everything (two hammocks
              and a tarp) all connected at one point. I think I'll be doing that
              from now on whenever there's no chance of a driving rain.

              Yes, the pad segments make great sit-upons, that was part of my
              thinking. I'd even have a few for friends!

              I guess all the pads would make a good Plan B insulation underneath
              me. Hadn't thought about that... The 1/4" CCF pad inside the sleeve is
              also for ground protection if I am forced to go there, I want a little
              more puncture prevention for that expensive DAM!

              The ossel hitch was a nifty knot that someone else posted about- they
              attached their rope to their hammock using it. I looked all over the
              Web for that diagram, and since it was so hard to find, I posted it. I
              considered using it for a while, but went back to my favored slipped
              double sheet bend, now improved with "hammock huggers".

              Think that's all your questions... if not, let me know.

              Jonas
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