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Re: Hammock Camping Re: tree-saver webbing straps......

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  • Matt Pulsts
    true. there is stretch involved in the nylon webbing. I wouldnt worry too much about it. Also, there are spectra slings which work extremely well. I just
    Message 1 of 14 , May 1 12:37 PM
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      true. there is  stretch involved in the nylon webbing. I wouldnt worry too much about it.  Also, there are "spectra" slings which work extremely well.  I just happened to be cleaning my gear closet right before I read this and saw my collection of slings.  Brain fart about not differentiating amongst them.  
       
      Just an idea if you cant find poly...
       
       
      ----- Original tueMessage -----
      From: Rick
      Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 10:54
      Subject: Hammock Camping Re: tree-saver webbing straps......

      Matt,

      Only problem there,  if I remember this stuff from my climbing days,
      is that the climbing webb gear stuff is almost always nylon, not
      poly.  Unfortunately, the nylon stretches too much for hammocks. 

      Rick

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Matthew Pulsts"
      <mvpulsts@e...> wrote:
      > You might also try locating you local outfitter that deals in
      climbing gear.
      > They will sell webbing of all sorts.  The nice thing about the
      climbing
      > shop's webbing is that it HAS to have been tested and weight
      bearing specs
      > HAVE to be available.
      >

      >
      > Just a thought.
      >

      >
      > Matt
      >

      >

      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Rick [mailto:geoflyfisher@y...]
      > Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 8:56 AM
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Hammock Camping Re: tree-saver webbing straps......
      >

      >
      > I really appreciate it when someone calls me an enthusiastic
      > youngster.  You made my day!!!
      >
      > It would be wonderful to have specs on the webbing.  Unfortunately,
      > it is almost never available.  Ed and I have had this conversation
      > and it usually comes back to the fact that the manufacturer does
      not
      > want to be responsible for guarantees of breaking strength.  They
      > certainly do NOT want anyone putting their body weight on that
      > strap.  So getting a clear answer seems impossible.
      >
      > I agree with your assessment, yet have gone through a life of WAY
      > overengineering things just because I did not know strength... and
      of
      > gradual backing down on the material until a breakage did occur. 
      >
      > Maybe we should find an easy way to test straps??  Say you want to
      > say the strap is safe for 600 pound pull.  So you test it to 900 or
      > 1200 pounds 5-10 times to see it that destroys it???  Let me see,
      > what around here weighs that much?????  Half my car???  Maybe a big
      > fish??  You have any ideas?
      >
      > Rick
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble"
      <dpwomble@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <geoflyfisher@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Christina,
      > > >
      > > > I bought some 1 inch poly webbing at the local Dayton WalMart
      > > > yesterday.  Look in the fabric department near the ribbons and
      > > > stuff.  It seems to have been strong enough for hammock straps,
      > > which
      > > > would make it ok for tree huggers too.  Cost is $.79 per yard.
      > > >
      > > > Rick
      > > >
      > >
      > > Rick,
      > >
      > > Be careful how you determine if the webbing is strong enough.  If
      > you
      > > use it once and it didn't break, that doesn't necessarily imply
      > that
      > > it is strong enough to use 100 times, all that means is it didn't
      > > break the last time you used it.  I think the best way is to pay
      > > attention to manufacturer's specifications, or barring that, go
      > with
      > > something that is obviously an over-kill for the application or
      > > stress it once by several orders of magnitude greater than your
      > > application in a way that a failure will not result in an injury
      > (and
      > > then, maybe not use that particular piece of material again). 
      > >
      > > I know that Ed Speer has had both good and bad experience with
      > > different webbing and has recommendations in his book about what
      > > tensile strengths he recommends.  As a hammock user I would
      suggest
      > a
      > > little caution in recommending weight bearing material for use in
      a
      > > hammock.  
      > >
      > > Sorry to act like a wet blanket, I really appreciate your
      > enthusiasm
      > > and willingness to share your ideas, but being an older guy with
      an
      > > analytical background, I felt like I needed to put that out there.
      > >
      > > Youngblood
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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