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Re: Hammock Camping New! Improved! the Quarter Weight Hammock

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  • Rick
    Optimist or pessamist? I prefer to note that: Original 4 quarter hammock weighed 1.5 pounds. I cut the weight of the hammock by 50 cent. Which is one reason I
    Message 1 of 15 , May 1 9:52 AM
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      Optimist or pessamist?

      I prefer to note that:
      Original 4 quarter hammock weighed 1.5 pounds.
      I cut the weight of the hammock by 50 cent.
      Which is one reason I now call it the quarter weight hammock.

      Rick <><

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
      > Does that mean you now have a 50 cent hammock? LOL
      > Thunder boomers today are shutting down my computer. Be back up
      > later..Ed
      >
      >
      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping>
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Rick [mailto:geoflyfisher@y...]
      > Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 11:24 AM
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Hammock Camping New! Improved! the Quarter Weight Hammock
      >
      >
      >
      > A couple changes I made overnight: It does not work for me to make
      > button holes to put the quarters in... they keep coming out when I
      > throw the net over the hammock and back... You have no idea how
      many
      > quarters you can loose this way.
      >
      > It is also unnecessary to have quarters at the ends as weights..
      Just
      > two weights about 2.5 feet from each end... For this I took a
      > quarter and slipped it down the hem and just sewed it permanently
      in
      > place. Then I did the same for a second quarter 2.5 feet from the
      > other end.
      >
      > So now I guess it is not a 4 quarter hammock, but a "quarter weight
      > hammock" - does that sound nice to the ear of you ultralight
      > hikers?? Clever i'd say ;)
      >
      > Rick <><
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <geoflyfisher@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > Goals:
      > >
      > > - more comfortable way to use pad as insulation
      > > - readily available material
      > > - no ridge cord
      > > - inexpensive
      > >
      > > Materials:
      > >
      > > 10 yards of 1" poly webbing
      > > 6 2/3 yards 48" polyester cloth (soft to the touch, ??
      doubleknit)
      > > (about 1.5 oz/yard)
      > > 3 1/3 yards of 48" polyester chiffon (wedding veil material)
      > >
      > > Instructions:
      > >
      > > - Lay the chiffon out and scribe/cut one edge so that it is a
      foot
      > > less wide at the ends than in the middle of the long edge. Make
      > the
      > > cut a curve, a segment of a large circle, like the side of a
      kayak
      > > seen from above.
      > > - Cut the polyester hammock material into two pieces 3 1/3 yards
      > long
      > > - Cut the poly webbing into two equal lengths (15 feet)
      > > - singe the long edge cut of the chiffon and the ends of all
      > pieces
      > > (a propane torch is the easy way to do this)
      > > - make a sandwich with chiffon between two layers of polyester
      and
      > > sew a long edge of the two polyester layers and the cut edge of
      the
      > > chifon with a half inch seam allowance.
      > > - At the end of the seam, there will be extra chiffon left over
      > > (about 3-4 inches). Cut a strip from the end of the chiffon that
      > > width and then re-singe the edge.
      > > - turn the outside layers of the sandwitch back and stitch 2.5
      feet
      > > of each end of the long edge of those two layers, forming a
      pocket
      > of
      > > hammock material with a layer of chiffon coming out of the
      opposite
      > > edge of the "hammock to be"
      > > - make a Speer type overhand knot in both layers of the hammock
      > > material, at each end. Incorporate no more of the chiffon in the
      > > knot than is necessary along the one edge.
      > > - sew 4 button holes an inch from the free edge of the chiffon.
      > This
      > > edge of the chiffon is still serged, like it came from the
      store.
      > > Make the holes big enough to fit a quarter through the hole
      > > - Sew a 1.5 inch hem with the button holes centered on one side
      of
      > > the hem. Put a quarter through each button hole and sew across
      the
      > > hem on each side of the quarter to make a small pocket, holding
      the
      > > quarter. (The quarters are weights for the bug net made of
      > chiffon,
      > > they can be replaced with small smooth stones, but remember not
      to
      > > put the stones into a telephone to call home.)
      > > - wrap the last 6 inches of a poly web around the hammock
      material
      > > near the overhand knot. Switch to a zig-zag stitch, 2mm wide and
      > 1mm
      > > in length and tripple sew across both thickneses of the strap
      about
      > a
      > > half inch from the hammock material. Repeat the zig zag stitch 2
      > > inches further out.
      > >
      > > You are left with a hammock with a double bottom layer and a bug
      > net
      > > which hangs closed without velcro. Your Target blue pad will fit
      > > very nicely into the pocket of hammock material and you can add
      > other
      > > flat clothing if you like. The hammock is hung with Ed Speer's 4
      > > wrap knot and if tensioned with about 5 pounds of force pulls the
      > > chord of the circle segment which is the cut edge of the chiffon
      so
      > > the bug net is tight over the hammock.
      > >
      > > My cost for the prototype:
      > >
      > > Webbing 10 yards at 0.79 (ouch!) $7.90
      > > hammock material 6.6 yards at 1.97 13.00
      > > chiffon 3.3 yards at 2.97 9.80
      > > 500 yards of polyester thread .50
      > > Total $31.20
      > >
      > > Total time to build: about an hour
      > >
      > > I slept in the prototype (minus the quarters) last night with my
      > > quilt. It was comfortable and warm with the outside air
      > temperature
      > > about 50. It sure was nice not needing to worry with the pad all
      > the
      > > time. I usually turn over 5-8 times in a night and it was much
      > > easier to do so without any trouble. When I got up in the
      middle
      > of
      > > the night to pee, it sure was handy not to have to open the
      velcro
      > > and then work to close it again.
      > >
      > > Let me express my indebtness to Ed Speer in this design. He
      wrote
      > > the book that got me sewing hammocks. This design retains his
      poly
      > > webbing support straps, and his overhand knot. New features
      > include
      > > a double bottom (partly in debt to Ray Garlington and partly to
      the
      > > Crazy Creek hammock); a self closing bug net for which I got the
      > > germinal idea when looking at a Crazy Creek hammock; a weight
      > closing
      > > system, modified to quarters from the water bottle system that
      > > Chad "the one" was using on the AT in Hot Springs, and a bug net
      > > suspension system of my own invention.
      > >
      > > Now, go out and reproduce (hammocks)!
      > >
      > > Rick <><
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
      >
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      >
      >
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    • Debra Weisenstein
      Why not just leave open pockets for the weights? A swiss army knife could provide a nice weight in one. Any maybe a headlamp for the other, since you want
      Message 2 of 15 , May 1 10:33 AM
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        Why not just leave open pockets for the weights? A swiss army knife
        could provide a nice weight in one. Any maybe a headlamp for the
        other, since you want that handy at night anyway.

        Deb

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <geoflyfisher@y...> wrote:
        > Optimist or pessamist?
        >
        > I prefer to note that:
        > Original 4 quarter hammock weighed 1.5 pounds.
        > I cut the weight of the hammock by 50 cent.
        > Which is one reason I now call it the quarter weight hammock.
        >
        > Rick <><
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
        > > Does that mean you now have a 50 cent hammock? LOL
        > > Thunder boomers today are shutting down my computer. Be back up
        > > later..Ed
        > >
        > >
        > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping>
        > > -----Original Message-----
        > > From: Rick [mailto:geoflyfisher@y...]
        > > Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2003 11:24 AM
        > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Hammock Camping New! Improved! the Quarter Weight Hammock
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > A couple changes

        I made overnight: It does not work for me to make
        > > button holes to put the quarters in... they keep coming out when I
        > > throw the net over the hammock and back... You have no idea how
        > many
        > > quarters you can loose this way.
        > >
        > > It is also unnecessary to have quarters at the ends as weights..
        > Just
        > > two weights about 2.5 feet from each end... For this I took a
        > > quarter and slipped it down the hem and just sewed it permanently
        > in
        > > place. Then I did the same for a second quarter 2.5 feet from the
        > > other end.
        > >
        > > So now I guess it is not a 4 quarter hammock, but a "quarter weight
        > > hammock" - does that sound nice to the ear of you ultralight
        > > hikers?? Clever i'd say ;)
        > >
        > > Rick <><
        > >
        > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <geoflyfisher@y...>
        > > wrote:
        > > > Goals:
        > > >
        > > > - more comfortable way to use pad as insulation
        > > > - readily available material
        > > > - no ridge cord
        > > > - inexpensive
        > > >
        > > > Materials:
        > > >
        > > > 10 yards of 1" poly webbing
        > > > 6 2/3 yards 48" polyester cloth (soft to the touch, ??
        > doubleknit)
        > > > (about 1.5 oz/yard)
        > > > 3 1/3 yards of 48" polyester chiffon (wedding veil material)
        > > >
        > > > Instructions:
        > > >
        > > > - Lay the chiffon out and scribe/cut one edge so that it is a
        > foot
        > > > less wide at the ends than in the middle of the long edge. Make
        > > the
        > > > cut a curve, a segment of a large circle, like the side of a
        > kayak
        > > > seen from above.
        > > > - Cut the polyester hammock material into two pieces 3 1/3 yards
        > > long
        > > > - Cut the poly webbing into two equal lengths (15 feet)
        > > > - singe the long edge cut of the chiffon and the ends of all
        > > pieces
        > > > (a propane torch is the easy way to do this)
        > > > - make a sandwich with chiffon between two layers of polyester
        > and
        > > > sew a long edge of the two polyester layers and the cut edge of
        > the
        > > > chifon with a half inch seam allowance.
        > > > - At the end of the seam, there will be extra chiffon left over
        > > > (about 3-4 inches). Cut a strip from the end of the chiffon that
        > > > width and then re-singe the edge.
        > > > - turn the outside layers of the sandwitch back and stitch 2.5
        > feet
        > > > of each end of the long edge of those two layers, forming a
        > pocket
        > > of
        > > > hammock material with a layer of chiffon coming out of the
        > opposite
        > > > edge of the "hammock to be"
        > > > - make a Speer type overhand knot in both layers of the hammock
        > > > material, at each end. Incorporate no more of the chiffon in the
        > > > knot than is necessary along the one edge.
        > > > - sew 4 button holes an inch from the free edge of the chiffon.
        > > This
        > > > edge of the chiffon is still serged, like it came from the
        > store.
        > > > Make the holes big enough to fit a quarter through the hole
        > > > - Sew a 1.5 inch hem with the button holes centered on one side
        > of
        > > > the hem. Put a quarter through each button hole and sew across
        > the
        > > > hem on each side of the quarter to make a small pocket, holding
        > the
        > > > quarter. (The quarters are weights for the bug net made of
        > > chiffon,
        > > > they can be replaced with small smooth stones, but remember not
        > to
        > > > put the stones into a telephone to call home.)
        > > > - wrap the last 6 inches of a poly web around the hammock
        > material
        > > > near the overhand knot. Switch to a zig-zag stitch, 2mm wide and
        > > 1mm
        > > > in length and tripple sew across both thickneses of the strap
        > about
        > > a
        > > > half inch from the hammock material. Repeat the zig zag stitch 2
        > > > inches further out.
        > > >
        > > > You are left with a hammock with a double bottom layer and a bug
        > > net
        > > > which hangs closed without velcro. Your Target blue pad will fit
        > > > very nicely into the pocket of hammock material and you can add
        > > other
        > > > flat clothing if you like. The hammock is hung with Ed Speer's 4
        > > > wrap knot and if tensioned with about 5 pounds of force pulls the
        > > > chord of the circle segment which is the cut edge of the chiffon
        > so
        > > > the bug net is tight over the hammock.
        > > >
        > > > My cost for the prototype:
        > > >
        > > > Webbing 10 yards at 0.79 (ouch!) $7.90
        > > > hammock material 6.6 yards at 1.97 13.00
        > > > chiffon 3.3 yards at 2.97 9.80
        > > > 500 yards of polyester thread .50
        > > > Total $31.20
        > > >
        > > > Total time to build: about an hour
        > > >
        > > > I slept in the prototype (minus the quarters) last night with my
        > > > quilt. It was comfortable and warm with the outside air
        > > temperature
        > > > about 50. It sure was nice not needing to worry with the pad all
        > > the
        > > > time. I usually turn over 5-8 times in a night and it was much
        > > > easier to do so without any trouble. When I got up in the
        > middle
        > > of
        > > > the night to pee, it sure was handy not to have to open the
        > velcro
        > > > and then work to close it again.
        > > >
        > > > Let me express my indebtness to Ed Speer in this design. He
        > wrote
        > > > the book that got me sewing hammocks. This design retains his
        > poly
        > > > webbing support straps, and his overhand knot. New features
        > > include
        > > > a double bottom (partly in debt to Ray Garlington and partly to
        > the
        > > > Crazy Creek hammock); a self closing bug net for which I got the
        > > > germinal idea when looking at a Crazy Creek hammock; a weight
        > > closing
        > > > system, modified to quarters from the water bottle system that
        > > > Chad "the one" was using on the AT in Hot Springs, and a bug net
        > > > suspension system of my own invention.
        > > >
        > > > Now, go out and reproduce (hammocks)!
        > > >
        > > > Rick <><
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        > >
        > >
        > <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=251812.3170658.4537139.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=17
        > 05
        > > 065843:HM/A=1564416/R=0/*http://www.netflix.com/Default?
        > mqso=60164797&pa
        > > rtid=3170658>
        > >
        > > <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
        > M=251812.3170658.4537139.1261774/D=egrou
        > > pmail/S=:HM/A=1564416/rand=592629266>
        > >
        > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
        > > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .
      • Per-Arne Asp
        Good thinking Debra, multiple use... //p-a
        Message 3 of 15 , May 1 10:48 AM
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          Good thinking Debra, multiple use...

          //p-a

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
          <dweisens@a...> wrote:
          > Why not just leave open pockets for the weights? A swiss army knife
          > could provide a nice weight in one. Any maybe a headlamp for the
          > other, since you want that handy at night anyway.
          >
          > Deb
        • Rick
          ... Having a pocket there is a good idea, to keep glasses, etc. But the two quarters seem to have enough weight to keep it closed in a little breeze, and
          Message 4 of 15 , May 2 7:04 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            "Debra Weisenstein" wrote:
            > Why not just leave open pockets for the weights?

            Having a pocket there is a good idea, to keep glasses, etc. But the
            two quarters seem to have enough weight to keep it closed in a little
            breeze, and their total weight is 10 grams... Nice thing since I
            closed them in is that they do not go flying through the woods when I
            open the net in the middle of the night.

            Rick <><
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