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the ongoing saga of wet-weather testing...err..camping

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  • BRIAN
    Hey guys, I,m glad to hear that everyone had a great time on Springer. I was thinking of you all on New Years Eve. I ended up getting some time off after all
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 4, 2006
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      Hey guys,

      I,m glad to hear that everyone had a great time on Springer. I was
      thinking of you all on New Years Eve. I ended up getting some time
      off after all but not in time to make it to Georgia. Instead I made
      it to the Suwannee River for a canoe trip. I had a great time but on
      the second night my hammock and peapod got soaking wet. This happened
      during a extremely heavy thunderstorm that lasted several hours. I
      tried everything I could think of to stop the water from traveling
      down the hammock straps but nothing worked. This was about 10pm and
      made for a long, chilli, wet night. The temperature was forcast to
      drop the next night and the sky was overcast the entire next day. I
      was forced to make the difficult choice of ending my trip early. My
      point is that I have lost confidence in the ability of my strap system
      to keep me dry and am considering going back to a tree hugger and rope
      setup. Marta did you ever solve your wet weather problem? I tried
      Dave's idea of using synthetic socks but they didn't work so well. Any
      other ideas? Anyone...anyone...Bueller...8^).
    • dchinell
      Brian: I had a similar experience in Algonquin park. The straps got wet through during the first few minutes of downpour. I d failed to attach drip strings
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 5, 2006
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        Brian:

        I had a similar experience in Algonquin park. The straps got wet
        through during the first few minutes of downpour. I'd failed to
        attach drip strings when I set up, and it seemed that nothing I
        added later worked.

        This was despite the fact that I used separate straps for the tree
        ropes, and the ends of these were under the tarp, where the hammock
        ropes were tied to them. So the joint between tree and hammock
        straps was somewhat protected.

        IF it ever happened again, I'd get out of the hammock and try to tie
        it up to the ridgeline, just to keep it from getting soaked. Then
        I'd lower the tarp and plan to spend the night on the ground.

        As it was, I bagged up my sleeping stuff to keep it dry, put on my
        poncho, and sat up all night. Sometimes I sat in the hammock,
        sometimes I sat on logs outside. After a while it didn't much matter
        as everything everywhere got wet.

        On the plus side, a wolf stuck his head under my tarp, took one look
        at me, and took off running. I would have done the same, had I not
        been paralized with terror.

        My idea for improving my rig is to put a metal ring or carabiner
        between the tree strap and the hammock strap. This should prevent
        wetting-through by capilliary action, provide a natural drip point,
        and an anchor point for drip strings.

        Also, though I hate to say anything bad about Mosquito Hammocks, the
        tarp for the Jungle Hammock is not waterproof, but only water
        resistant. The hammock body, however, IS waterproof. Seems exactly
        backwards, but manufacturer, Tom Claytor, says that's the way his
        customers wanted it.

        So I'm also going to have to invest in a silnylon tarp to replace
        the stock tarp -- if I ever take that model into a rainy forecast
        again.

        Bear
      • Bill in Houston
        One of the hammocks I have seen uses a drip ring , which is just a ring that the rope passes through, loops around, and passes through again. I think I will
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 5, 2006
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          One of the hammocks I have seen uses a "drip ring", which is just a
          ring that the rope passes through, loops around, and passes through
          again. I think I will try that with a pvc fitting or something else
          lightweight.

          Bill in Houston

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dchinell" <david.chinell@g...>
          wrote:
          <snip>
          > My idea for improving my rig is to put a metal ring or carabiner
          > between the tree strap and the hammock strap. This should prevent
          > wetting-through by capilliary action, provide a natural drip point,
          > and an anchor point for drip strings.
        • Rosaleen Sullivan
          Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 14:54:10 -0000 From: dchinell Subject: Re: the ongoing saga of wet-weather
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 5, 2006
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            Date: Thu, 05 Jan 2006 14:54:10 -0000
            From: "dchinell" <david.chinell@...<mailto:david.chinell@...>>
            Subject: Re: the ongoing saga of wet-weather testing...err..camping

            Bear-

            May I make two suggestions?

            If you decide that you want a metal ring of some sort that you can use as an easy connector, check into the links used to connect lengths of chain. They look sort of "D" shaped and have a threaded sleeve that screws open or closed. If my observations are correct, you should be able to find smaller and lighter (maybe cheaper) screw-fastening links rated to a safe load than carabiners with the same ratings. Better yet, these can be found in most hardware or home centers, making them easier to "reach out and touch" than quality carabiners are Florida. I don't remember seeing a lot of stores like EMS or REI (or the former Galyans) when I used to visit my parents in your area. (At least Y'All have a lot of Big Lots and Dollar Stores.)

            Next, check out the Atsko Water-Guard tests at BGT. I'm one of the testers. If you prefer not to purchase a silnylon tarp right now, consider washing and treating your nylon fly with Water-Guard according to Atsko's directions. I am so impressed with the stuff that I ordered a couple more cans and a half gallon of the Sport-Wash. You might only find the aerosol spray can of Water-Guard for synthetics at the Atsko web site right now. I've found the silicone version at WalMart and the trigger spray variety on-line. Unless your tarp already has some silicone in or on it, I think you want the fluoropolymer product #1357.

            Cheers!

            Rosaleen



            Brian:

            I had a similar experience in Algonquin park. The straps got wet
            through during the first few minutes of downpour. I'd failed to
            attach drip strings when I set up, and it seemed that nothing I
            added later worked.

            (snip)

            My idea for improving my rig is to put a metal ring or carabiner
            between the tree strap and the hammock strap. This should prevent
            wetting-through by capilliary action, provide a natural drip point,
            and an anchor point for drip strings.

            Also, though I hate to say anything bad about Mosquito Hammocks, the
            tarp for the Jungle Hammock is not waterproof, but only water
            resistant. The hammock body, however, IS waterproof. Seems exactly
            backwards, but manufacturer, Tom Claytor, says that's the way his
            customers wanted it.

            So I'm also going to have to invest in a silnylon tarp to replace
            the stock tarp -- if I ever take that model into a rainy forecast
            again.

            Bear

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • dlfrost_1
            ... No, you can t get em lighter. Carabiners are made of high-strength aluminum alloy while snap-links and their kin are steel. For any two of equal rating
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 6, 2006
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rosaleen Sullivan"
              <rosaleen43@m...> wrote:
              > If you decide that you want a metal ring of some sort that you can
              > use as an easy connector, check into the links used to connect
              > lengths of chain. They look sort of "D" shaped and have a threaded
              > sleeve that screws open or closed. If my observations are correct,
              > you should be able to find smaller and lighter (maybe cheaper)
              > screw-fastening links rated to a safe load than carabiners with
              > the same ratings.

              No, you can't get 'em lighter. Carabiners are made of high-strength
              aluminum alloy while snap-links and their kin are steel. For any two
              of equal rating the 'biner will be lighter. And the 'biner will be
              more trustworthy because it's designed to hold climbers. They do
              cost more (around $15-20 each) however. Their larger size actually
              makes them easier to use, particularly with webbing. (You can tie
              off with gloved hands in wintertime, for example.) If the gate side
              faces the ground they can work well as drip guards too.

              Doug Frost
            • Dave Womble
              This is what I used when I experimented with webbing and water: http://tinyurl.com/akrrv . The steepness of the hammock s sag angle as well as the orientation
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 7, 2006
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                This is what I used when I experimented with webbing and water:
                http://tinyurl.com/akrrv . The steepness of the hammock's sag angle as
                well as the orientation (whether the webbing rested such that the ring
                was up & down versus side-to-side) limited its effectiveness.

                Youngblood
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