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Using a poncho as a rain fly

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  • bezirk
    I tried searching the old posts for information on using a poncho as a rain fly on a HH Exporer Ultralite, but I gave up and decided to ask. GoLite has a
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 3, 2006
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      I tried searching the old posts for information on using a poncho as a rain fly on a HH
      Exporer Ultralite, but I gave up and decided to ask.

      GoLite has a 104x58 poncho. The long diagonal is only an inch or so shorter than the
      stock fly, based on my high school geometry, it seems like it would provide a little more
      coverage than the original asymetric rain, I'm curious if anyone has actually used one in
      the field.

      One other question, has anyone tried installing their snake skins between the hooks and
      the hammock? It seems like that would make setup easier in the rain.

      Since this is my first post I guess I should introduce myself a bit. I've been backpacking
      since I was in scouts (as the oldest Tenderfoot in the history of my troop) and bought my
      hammock 2 years ago. I live in Virginia and disappear into Shenandoah NP as often as my
      wife and grad school allow me the time.

      Other than my first night (August '03) when I 'froze' with a felt bag and no pad. I've
      enjoyed every night in my hammock. I used a thermarest after that, though I tried a
      closed cell foam pad last weekend and slept just fine with lows in the high 30's.

      As you might have guessed, the poncho and the foam pad are part of a drive to lower my
      base weight. The foam pad saves a pound as does an alcohol stove. I've got reasonably
      light sleeping bags and a fairly light pack. My best shot a losing the next pound and a half
      (without spending a fortune) is to swap the fly, a pack cover, and a windbreaker for a
      poncho.
    • jwj32542
      ... windbreaker for a ... It can be done with a big enough poncho. Ridgeline length is a big deal, though - the ends of the hammock are the only places I ve
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 3, 2006
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bezirk" <bezirk@y...> wrote:
        > My best shot a losing the next pound and a half
        > (without spending a fortune) is to swap the fly, a pack cover, and a
        windbreaker for a
        > poncho.

        It can be done with a big enough poncho. Ridgeline length is a big
        deal, though - the ends of the hammock are the only places I've
        experienced windblown rain wetting the hammock.

        I put snakeskins right at the end of the hammock, under the tarp, as
        you suggest. It works fine for me, but I tie to the tree instead of
        using the HH clips. I don't see why it wouldn't work with the clips,
        though.

        Jeff
      • David Wills
        ... a rain fly on a HH ... shorter than the ... provide a little more ... actually used one in ... I used a 96x72 poncho (6x8 blue tarp with a slit and
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 4, 2006
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bezirk" <bezirk@y...> wrote:
          >
          > I tried searching the old posts for information on using a poncho as
          a rain fly on a HH
          > Exporer Ultralite, but I gave up and decided to ask.
          >
          > GoLite has a 104x58 poncho. The long diagonal is only an inch or so
          shorter than the
          > stock fly, based on my high school geometry, it seems like it would
          provide a little more
          > coverage than the original asymetric rain, I'm curious if anyone has
          actually used one in
          > the field.

          I used a 96x72 poncho (6x8 blue tarp with a slit and makeshift hood,
          ugliest piece of gear ever imagined)for a few drizzly night in my
          backyard in the diagonal formation, and it didn't let any verticle
          drizzle in, although I forgot to make drip lines on the hammock
          supports, so it came in from the ropes. Blowing rain could be a
          problem if you have a down bag. You may want to check Mountain Laurel
          Designs poncho under super tarps. It is a little bit wider than the
          GoLite and could be that extra bit of protection you would want. You
          can also custom order from them, making it a 9.5' or 10' long poncho.
          One other advantage is that you could say you have a product from the
          crazy people that sponsor the even crazier people from Team MLD, and
          make 2.25 oz packs, 11oz down bags, and 5.5 oz tarps. *Disclaimer*-
          No affiliation, just a big fan. Trailquest.net has a 63x116" poncho
          that includes seamsealing for $95. Hard to beat the $45 from GoLite
          though. - David with no trailname
        • Dick Matthews
          The Campmor Ultralite Extension Poncho/Tarp has been a very good replacement fly for the hammock, but a rain jacket to wear around camp is needed. Once the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 4, 2006
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            The Campmor Ultralite Extension Poncho/Tarp has been a very good
            replacement fly for the hammock, but a rain jacket to wear around camp
            is needed. Once the poncho was set too flat when it rained and the
            poncho turned into a funnel. Two ways to prevent this problem. One is to
            pitch the side with the hood with a steep slope. The other is to throw a
            clove hitch around the hood and elevate it by guying to an overhead
            branch. It is easier to keep the hood tightly closed if a cord lock is
            added to the hood drawcord. Two 12.5” TripTease cords are used for the
            fly guylines.

            The Campmor is also 104" X 58" which in theory is a 119 diagonal. The
            GoLite has center tie loops on the short side which allows the poncho to
            be pitched in an A-frame. The GoLite is heavier.

            I prefer to have the snakeskins outside the fly in rain to keep the
            hammock line as dry as possible. First hang the hammock while still
            inside the snakeskin sheath. Then hang the poncho with a couple of 6'
            lines secured near the tree huggers. Pull the snakes skins and weight
            the hammock. Then retension the hammock knots, disconnect the poncho and
            move the snake skins outside the hooks then attach the poncho to the hooks.

            The poncho provides adequate coverage when it is attached to the hooks
            on the hammock line AND sites are chosen carefully. I like to hang the
            hammock near the shore of lakes. Wind blows across the lake then upward
            when it gets to the lake bank. It can seem like the rain is blowing up
            under the fly. I have replaced standard O-ring on the Hennessy pull out
            with a minicarabiner. In extreme weather I attach the poncho corner
            directly to the pull out. It spoils your view, but you stay dry.

            Dick Matthews
            Colorado

            bezirk wrote:

            >I tried searching the old posts for information on using a poncho as a rain fly on a HH
            >Exporer Ultralite, but I gave up and decided to ask.
            >
            >GoLite has a 104x58 poncho. The long diagonal is only an inch or so shorter than the
            >stock fly, based on my high school geometry, it seems like it would provide a little more
            >coverage than the original asymetric rain, I'm curious if anyone has actually used one in
            >the field.
            >
            >One other question, has anyone tried installing their snake skins between the hooks and
            >the hammock? It seems like that would make setup easier in the rain.
            >
            >Since this is my first post I guess I should introduce myself a bit. I've been backpacking
            >since I was in scouts (as the oldest Tenderfoot in the history of my troop) and bought my
            >hammock 2 years ago. I live in Virginia and disappear into Shenandoah NP as often as my
            >wife and grad school allow me the time.
            >
            >Other than my first night (August '03) when I 'froze' with a felt bag and no pad. I've
            >enjoyed every night in my hammock. I used a thermarest after that, though I tried a
            >closed cell foam pad last weekend and slept just fine with lows in the high 30's.
            >
            >As you might have guessed, the poncho and the foam pad are part of a drive to lower my
            >base weight. The foam pad saves a pound as does an alcohol stove. I've got reasonably
            >light sleeping bags and a fairly light pack. My best shot a losing the next pound and a half
            >(without spending a fortune) is to swap the fly, a pack cover, and a windbreaker for a
            >poncho.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • bezirk
            I ve been out in the rain a few times without ever getting wet in the hammock. The ridgeline is the only place I am certain a poncho would be a good
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 4, 2006
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              I've been out in the rain a few times without ever getting wet in the hammock. The
              ridgeline is the only place I am certain a poncho would be a good replacement. The HH fly
              is 120 inches at the ridge line and the poncho is 119 inches.

              > It can be done with a big enough poncho. Ridgeline length is a big
              > deal, though - the ends of the hammock are the only places I've
              > experienced windblown rain wetting the hammock.
              >
              >
              > Jeff
              >
            • bezirk
              That would to the trick and then some. Its probably out my budget at the moment. Although if I was about to embark on a thur hike it would be worth the money.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 4, 2006
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                That would to the trick and then some. Its probably out my budget at the moment.
                Although if I was about to embark on a thur hike it would be worth the money.

                Thanks

                dz

                > No affiliation, just a big fan. Trailquest.net has a 63x116" poncho
                > that includes seamsealing for $95. Hard to beat the $45 from GoLite
                > though. - David with no trailname
                >
              • bezirk
                ... I saw this one too. I was leaning towards the only because it was green. How does the coverage compare on the sides? Your point is the taken about the
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 4, 2006
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Dick Matthews <dick@c...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > The Campmor Ultralite Extension Poncho/Tarp has been a very good
                  > replacement fly for the hammock, but a rain jacket to wear around camp
                  > is needed.

                  I saw this one too. I was leaning towards the only because it was green. How does the
                  coverage compare on the sides? Your point is the taken about the rain jacket. I only see
                  swapping the poncho for the HH fly, the pack cover, and the windbreaker on short trips
                  when there isn't rain in the forecast. If I'm out longer I'll probably have a shell along as an
                  extra layer.

                  Thanks for the advice.

                  dz
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