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Winnemucca Lake trip report

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  • jwj32542
    Sounds like the weather men got our forecasts mixed up! I think I got the Mt Mitchell weather! My Brunton ADC didn t arrive so I don t have good numbers, but
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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      Sounds like the weather men got our forecasts mixed up! I think I
      got the Mt Mitchell weather!

      My Brunton ADC didn't arrive so I don't have good numbers, but here
      are my guesses until I find better numbers (I'm sure it's online
      somewhere).

      The trip - Winnemucca Lake, CA, in the Sierras. Elevation 9000 ft,
      snow-shoe hike about 2 miles each way.

      Friday night - Low 15 F, winds sustained 15 mph, gusting to 30 mph.
      I used a homemade Speer, PeaPod, Exped Downmat 7, JRB NS top quilt,
      MacCat Standard. I was so warm that I had to occasionally vent the
      PeaPod down to my waist, even in the gusting wind!

      I slept in:
      Torso: Polyester long-sleeve T-shirt (like CoolMax or UnderArmour)
      Legs: Swim Trunks, silkweight poly thermals, fleece pants
      Feet: Liner socks, vapor barrier, heavy socks
      Head: Watch cap, Turtle Fur ear band, gaiter for my face

      Saturday - Absolutely beautiful sunrise...took pictures right from
      the hammock. Very windy and steady snow all day...high of probably
      25 F. We mostly hung around camp and tried to keep our feet thawed,
      but took a few short walks. Winnemucca Lake was frozen over and
      beautiful.

      Sat night to Sunday - worst storm I've experienced in the woods.

      On Friday morning, Sunday's forecast said ~23F, 40% chance precip,
      1" snow possible, winds 1 mph. Yes, ONE MILE PER HOUR. By the time
      the second group hiked in Saturday afternoon, the forecast had
      changed to 2-3 feet of snow. It hit Saturday night, though.

      It got dark about 6pm, so I restaked the MacCat and went to bed
      wearing the same things as Friday. I was warm, but the wind was
      blowing snow onto my PeaPod from underneath, and also kept changing
      directions and blowing snow in from both ends...not good in these
      temps and gusts. If I stayed here, I would be wet soon. After 45
      min or so, I decided to bail and went into a friend's GoLite Hex 3
      (floorless 4 season tarp-tent). That was 7pm Saturday.

      I put the JRB quilt inside the PeaPod, on top of the Exped, and cut
      my garbage bag pack liner for a ground cloth. At around midnight,
      the wind was blowing the snow into the tent. He had piled snow
      around the edges as a windblock...throughout the course of the
      night, the wind blew away the windblocks and started pulling at the
      stakes. (The snow stakes had be set for a day by this point, so
      they were stuck in there pretty good.) At this point, the wind was
      gusting like mad...I don't even know how to estimate it, but I'm
      guessing 40-60 mph.

      So we spend the night fending off snow (the PeaPod was covered but
      kept its loft most of the night) and trying to hold up the tent. at
      about 2am, we heard a few avalanch cannons. At about 4 am, we
      started packing up so we could fix the tent. We didn't want to
      bother the stakes without having everything packed in case we lost
      it all. I had my warm clothes on and almost all of my stuff packed,
      and Patrick was just getting his stuff on and packed...when the tent
      blew away! POOF...just like that we were exposed! It was so cold
      it took my breath away, and I dove to catch the flying gear...when I
      realized that my gloves were laying on the ground waiting to blow
      away! Big mistake. I grabbed them and put them on before they were
      lost, though, and then laid on Patrick's stuff while he put on his
      boots and finished packing up. Luckily his Hex was also tied to a
      tree so we recovered it, but didn't even try to search for his 11
      snow stakes.

      So the two of us went to another tent...Rob had been laying against
      his tent wall to keep it from blowing away, so the three of us
      crammed into a 1.5 man tent and waited for the sun to come up. More
      avalanches. At sunrise, about 6:30 am, the four of us in Friday's
      carpool started packing up to leave. When I had gone to Patrick's
      tent the night before, I left my hammock and MacCat, so now I was
      curious if it would still be there.

      Praise for the MacCat!! It was flapping in the gusts because one of
      the two ridgeline tie-outs broke, and 3 of 4 corner tie-outs were
      broke. It was hanging by one ridgeline tie-out, one JRB tarp
      tensioning line on a corner, and a mini-carabiner attaching the
      other ridgeline to the hammock support. It bent that carabiner.
      After gusting like that all night, I found absolutely no signs of
      wear on the tarp.

      So we started hiking out at 8am. Two miles in 4.5 hours...and there
      were some pretty scary times. Even with snowshoes, we were still
      post-holing up to our thighs. Saw a couple of small avalanches near
      us, and twice we had to cross avalanche-prone slopes...a little
      nerve-wracking for a Georgia boy like me! 2-3 feet my butt. At
      least the wind was at our backs for most of the hike out.

      Patrick's GPS saved us...in that weather, map and compass would have
      been extremely difficult because we couldn't see any terrain
      referents, and the trail wasn't marked. And of course we couldn't
      see how we had come in because of the new snow. We knew where the
      road was so we could have made it out, but it would have been much
      more difficult because of the terrain in the High Sierras. As it
      was, if the trail were a mile longer we would have had to hole up
      for the day.

      We finally got to the trailhead about 12:30...and had to dig the car
      out. We were all soaked completely through and exhausted. We
      couldn't feel our feet and I could barely move my fingers because I
      lost a mitten shell when the tent blew away. There were times when
      we weren't sure how we would make it out Sunday. If Patrick and I
      had waited another 15 minutes to start packing up before the tent
      blew away, this would be a very different story...very close call.

      Good trip, though - nothing like breaking in a snow-camping newbie
      with an unexpected Sierra blizzard! We were prepared for it as a
      group, but the deep snow that wouldn't support our snow shoes gave
      us big problems...at times, we could only take one step and rest,
      one step and rest, etc.

      Learned several good lessons about my gear and about snow camping -
      I'll post them with pics on my page soon. Might even include some
      videos of the perfectly horizontal snow.

      Most important lesson: Hammocking in cold temps is easy. Being
      prepared for a Sierra-style snowstorm in a hammock is not. Have a
      bail-out plan that won't blow away.

      Jeff
    • Ed Speer
      WOW Jeff, sounds like quite an experience all right! Glad to hear your skills and common sense saved your butt-sometimes all the gear we carry just isn t up
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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        WOW Jeff, sounds like quite an experience all right! Glad to hear your
        skills and common sense saved your butt-sometimes all the gear we carry just
        isn't up to the task. I can only imagine just how brutal it must have
        been--you make it sound like way too much fun! I think I'd stay home at
        least for the rest of the holidays..Ed



        Moderator, Hammock Camping List
        Author, Hammock Camping, The Complete Guide

        Editor, Hammock Camping News

        Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc



        _____

        From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of jwj32542
        Sent: Monday, December 19, 2005 5:25 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Winnemucca Lake trip report



        Sounds like the weather men got our forecasts mixed up! I think I
        got the Mt Mitchell weather!

        My Brunton ADC didn't arrive so I don't have good numbers, but here
        are my guesses until I find better numbers (I'm sure it's online
        somewhere).

        The trip - Winnemucca Lake, CA, in the Sierras. Elevation 9000 ft,
        snow-shoe hike about 2 miles each way.

        Friday night - Low 15 F, winds sustained 15 mph, gusting to 30 mph.
        I used a homemade Speer, PeaPod, Exped Downmat 7, JRB NS top quilt,
        MacCat Standard. I was so warm that I had to occasionally vent the
        PeaPod down to my waist, even in the gusting wind!

        I slept in:
        Torso: Polyester long-sleeve T-shirt (like CoolMax or UnderArmour)
        Legs: Swim Trunks, silkweight poly thermals, fleece pants
        Feet: Liner socks, vapor barrier, heavy socks
        Head: Watch cap, Turtle Fur ear band, gaiter for my face

        Saturday - Absolutely beautiful sunrise...took pictures right from
        the hammock. Very windy and steady snow all day...high of probably
        25 F. We mostly hung around camp and tried to keep our feet thawed,
        but took a few short walks. Winnemucca Lake was frozen over and
        beautiful.

        Sat night to Sunday - worst storm I've experienced in the woods.

        On Friday morning, Sunday's forecast said ~23F, 40% chance precip,
        1" snow possible, winds 1 mph. Yes, ONE MILE PER HOUR. By the time
        the second group hiked in Saturday afternoon, the forecast had
        changed to 2-3 feet of snow. It hit Saturday night, though.

        It got dark about 6pm, so I restaked the MacCat and went to bed
        wearing the same things as Friday. I was warm, but the wind was
        blowing snow onto my PeaPod from underneath, and also kept changing
        directions and blowing snow in from both ends...not good in these
        temps and gusts. If I stayed here, I would be wet soon. After 45
        min or so, I decided to bail and went into a friend's GoLite Hex 3
        (floorless 4 season tarp-tent). That was 7pm Saturday.

        I put the JRB quilt inside the PeaPod, on top of the Exped, and cut
        my garbage bag pack liner for a ground cloth. At around midnight,
        the wind was blowing the snow into the tent. He had piled snow
        around the edges as a windblock...throughout the course of the
        night, the wind blew away the windblocks and started pulling at the
        stakes. (The snow stakes had be set for a day by this point, so
        they were stuck in there pretty good.) At this point, the wind was
        gusting like mad...I don't even know how to estimate it, but I'm
        guessing 40-60 mph.

        So we spend the night fending off snow (the PeaPod was covered but
        kept its loft most of the night) and trying to hold up the tent. at
        about 2am, we heard a few avalanch cannons. At about 4 am, we
        started packing up so we could fix the tent. We didn't want to
        bother the stakes without having everything packed in case we lost
        it all. I had my warm clothes on and almost all of my stuff packed,
        and Patrick was just getting his stuff on and packed...when the tent
        blew away! POOF...just like that we were exposed! It was so cold
        it took my breath away, and I dove to catch the flying gear...when I
        realized that my gloves were laying on the ground waiting to blow
        away! Big mistake. I grabbed them and put them on before they were
        lost, though, and then laid on Patrick's stuff while he put on his
        boots and finished packing up. Luckily his Hex was also tied to a
        tree so we recovered it, but didn't even try to search for his 11
        snow stakes.

        So the two of us went to another tent...Rob had been laying against
        his tent wall to keep it from blowing away, so the three of us
        crammed into a 1.5 man tent and waited for the sun to come up. More
        avalanches. At sunrise, about 6:30 am, the four of us in Friday's
        carpool started packing up to leave. When I had gone to Patrick's
        tent the night before, I left my hammock and MacCat, so now I was
        curious if it would still be there.

        Praise for the MacCat!! It was flapping in the gusts because one of
        the two ridgeline tie-outs broke, and 3 of 4 corner tie-outs were
        broke. It was hanging by one ridgeline tie-out, one JRB tarp
        tensioning line on a corner, and a mini-carabiner attaching the
        other ridgeline to the hammock support. It bent that carabiner.
        After gusting like that all night, I found absolutely no signs of
        wear on the tarp.

        So we started hiking out at 8am. Two miles in 4.5 hours...and there
        were some pretty scary times. Even with snowshoes, we were still
        post-holing up to our thighs. Saw a couple of small avalanches near
        us, and twice we had to cross avalanche-prone slopes...a little
        nerve-wracking for a Georgia boy like me! 2-3 feet my butt. At
        least the wind was at our backs for most of the hike out.

        Patrick's GPS saved us...in that weather, map and compass would have
        been extremely difficult because we couldn't see any terrain
        referents, and the trail wasn't marked. And of course we couldn't
        see how we had come in because of the new snow. We knew where the
        road was so we could have made it out, but it would have been much
        more difficult because of the terrain in the High Sierras. As it
        was, if the trail were a mile longer we would have had to hole up
        for the day.

        We finally got to the trailhead about 12:30...and had to dig the car
        out. We were all soaked completely through and exhausted. We
        couldn't feel our feet and I could barely move my fingers because I
        lost a mitten shell when the tent blew away. There were times when
        we weren't sure how we would make it out Sunday. If Patrick and I
        had waited another 15 minutes to start packing up before the tent
        blew away, this would be a very different story...very close call.

        Good trip, though - nothing like breaking in a snow-camping newbie
        with an unexpected Sierra blizzard! We were prepared for it as a
        group, but the deep snow that wouldn't support our snow shoes gave
        us big problems...at times, we could only take one step and rest,
        one step and rest, etc.

        Learned several good lessons about my gear and about snow camping -
        I'll post them with pics on my page soon. Might even include some
        videos of the perfectly horizontal snow.

        Most important lesson: Hammocking in cold temps is easy. Being
        prepared for a Sierra-style snowstorm in a hammock is not. Have a
        bail-out plan that won't blow away.

        Jeff






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      • Rick
        Glad you are OK Jeff. It was 0F here last night with no wind. Beautiful night, and I spent it indoors. If I had been aware of the forecast, I might have
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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          Glad you are OK Jeff.

          It was 0F here last night with no wind. Beautiful night, and I
          spent it indoors. If I had been aware of the forecast, I might
          have stayed outside in the hammock, with the snow moon as pretty
          as it is right now.

          Rick

          jwj32542 wrote:
          > Sounds like the weather men got our forecasts mixed up! I think I
          > got the Mt Mitchell weather!
          >
          > My Brunton ADC didn't arrive so I don't have good numbers, but here
          > are my guesses until I find better numbers (I'm sure it's online
          > somewhere).
          >
          > The trip - Winnemucca Lake, CA, in the Sierras. Elevation 9000 ft,
          > snow-shoe hike about 2 miles each way.
          >
          > Friday night - Low 15 F, winds sustained 15 mph, gusting to 30 mph.
          > I used a homemade Speer, PeaPod, Exped Downmat 7, JRB NS top quilt,
          > MacCat Standard. I was so warm that I had to occasionally vent the
          > PeaPod down to my waist, even in the gusting wind!
          >
        • Dave Womble
          Jeff, Damn... that makes Ed s torn hammock story seem like nothing. Glad you are able to tell your story. How much gear did the mountain claim on that trip,
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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            Jeff,

            Damn... that makes Ed's torn hammock story seem like nothing. Glad you
            are able to tell your story. How much gear did the mountain claim on
            that trip, yours as well as your buddies? Most important question: Is
            your wife putting you on restrictions? <grin>

            All kidding and such aside, both you and Ed were fortunate that ya'll
            were carrying insulation that would insulate you on the ground on those
            trips and especially fortunate that it was DAMs, since it is not
            something that either one of you normally carry(?). I think both of
            you took them somewhat for 'insurance purposes' on a winter hammock
            trip and it turned out to be insurance well spent. I've done the same
            before with my Stephenson's DAM and was glad I had it because of a
            winter storm with high winds... since I was hiking with tenters a
            shelter was mighty inviting, particularly with the DAM. Take that for
            what it is worth however, because that is for extreme winter hammock
            camping. Most folks are going to stay out of the woods when those
            conditions are forecast or get out of the woods when those conditions
            develop or go to a lower more protected area to wait in out.

            Dave
          • J.D. Hoessle
            ... Awesome report - Thanks! Looking forward to your pics. Glad that you are OK! All things considered, I think I prefer to just read about it - not
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@y...> wrote:
              > The trip - Winnemucca Lake, CA, in the Sierras. Elevation 9000 ft,
              > snow-shoe hike about 2 miles each way.

              Awesome report - Thanks! Looking forward to your pics.

              Glad that you are OK!

              All things considered, I think I prefer to just "read" about it - not
              experinece it....<g>....!

              Happy Trails,

              J.D.
            • jwj32542
              I looked up the wind chill: 15 F at 30 mph is -5 F, and 25 F with 60 mph is 3 F. Patrick (the guy with the Hex) said the winds were 100 mph on nearby Mt
              Message 6 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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                I looked up the wind chill: 15 F at 30 mph is -5 F, and 25 F with 60
                mph is 3 F. Patrick (the guy with the Hex) said the winds were 100
                mph on nearby Mt Diablo, and we were more exposed than that location
                so he thinks it might even be a bit higher for us. That puts
                Saturday night at -1 F with wind chill. I asked what the other
                folks on the trip think the wind speed was...waiting for replies.
                Amazing. One other tent collapsed Saturday night, and it was BGT
                test, too.

                Tim, I ordered the ADC Wind from eBay. When it didn't show up for
                several days, I called and the guy said it shipped on 5 Dec, but I
                still don't have it! Grrr. He had about 3000 comments with 99+%
                positive, so I trust that it'll come...sure would have been nice on
                this trip!

                Dave, you're right - I'm glad I had the DAM for insurance on this
                trip, and it sure helped out a lot when I bailed. I was able to
                sleep comfortably for a few hours with it - I would have been
                sitting up for those hours if I didn't have it. In those winds, I
                don't think I could have used an underquilt by itself without some
                sort of completely enclosed layer like a TravelPod or PeaPod. Like
                you said - this trip required insulation beyond what most people
                choose to go out in.

                Ed, it WAS way too much fun, in the "This sucks, but tomorrow I'll
                think it was cool" sort of way. Hitting a trip like that really
                increases confidence in outdoor skills, and I'm glad I had
                experienced people with me to teach me. I have a break from school,
                and we're taking a trip for the kids (might stay at a campground),
                then I think I'm gonna yo-yo the 32 mile Skyline to Sea Trail near
                Santa Cruz that runs from the coastal ridge to the shore. Temps
                will be 40 F to 70 F, so the only thing I'll have to deal with is
                the rain. Can't wait!

                Jeff
              • Steve Joiner
                Jeff: as one Georgia boy (I m actually an Alabama boy relocated to the big city in GA) to another, quoting a local radio talk show host, ...just damn! Sounds
                Message 7 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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                  Jeff:

                  as one Georgia boy (I'm actually an Alabama boy relocated to the big city in
                  GA) to another, quoting a local radio talk show host, "...just damn!"
                  Sounds like a fun trip that will be more fun now that you're finished and
                  out safe!

                  Steve
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  [mailto:hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of jwj32542
                  Sent: Monday, December 19, 2005 5:25 AM
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Winnemucca Lake trip report


                  Sounds like the weather men got our forecasts mixed up! I think I
                  got the Mt Mitchell weather!

                  My Brunton ADC didn't arrive so I don't have good numbers, but here
                  are my guesses until I find better numbers (I'm sure it's online
                  somewhere).

                  The trip - Winnemucca Lake, CA, in the Sierras. Elevation 9000 ft,
                  snow-shoe hike about 2 miles each way.

                  Friday night - Low 15 F, winds sustained 15 mph, gusting to 30 mph.
                  I used a homemade Speer, PeaPod, Exped Downmat 7, JRB NS top quilt,
                  MacCat Standard. I was so warm that I had to occasionally vent the
                  PeaPod down to my waist, even in the gusting wind!

                  I slept in:
                  Torso: Polyester long-sleeve T-shirt (like CoolMax or UnderArmour)
                  Legs: Swim Trunks, silkweight poly thermals, fleece pants
                  Feet: Liner socks, vapor barrier, heavy socks
                  Head: Watch cap, Turtle Fur ear band, gaiter for my face

                  Saturday - Absolutely beautiful sunrise...took pictures right from
                  the hammock. Very windy and steady snow all day...high of probably
                  25 F. We mostly hung around camp and tried to keep our feet thawed,
                  but took a few short walks. Winnemucca Lake was frozen over and
                  beautiful.

                  Sat night to Sunday - worst storm I've experienced in the woods.

                  On Friday morning, Sunday's forecast said ~23F, 40% chance precip,
                  1" snow possible, winds 1 mph. Yes, ONE MILE PER HOUR. By the time
                  the second group hiked in Saturday afternoon, the forecast had
                  changed to 2-3 feet of snow. It hit Saturday night, though.

                  It got dark about 6pm, so I restaked the MacCat and went to bed
                  wearing the same things as Friday. I was warm, but the wind was
                  blowing snow onto my PeaPod from underneath, and also kept changing
                  directions and blowing snow in from both ends...not good in these
                  temps and gusts. If I stayed here, I would be wet soon. After 45
                  min or so, I decided to bail and went into a friend's GoLite Hex 3
                  (floorless 4 season tarp-tent). That was 7pm Saturday.

                  I put the JRB quilt inside the PeaPod, on top of the Exped, and cut
                  my garbage bag pack liner for a ground cloth. At around midnight,
                  the wind was blowing the snow into the tent. He had piled snow
                  around the edges as a windblock...throughout the course of the
                  night, the wind blew away the windblocks and started pulling at the
                  stakes. (The snow stakes had be set for a day by this point, so
                  they were stuck in there pretty good.) At this point, the wind was
                  gusting like mad...I don't even know how to estimate it, but I'm
                  guessing 40-60 mph.

                  So we spend the night fending off snow (the PeaPod was covered but
                  kept its loft most of the night) and trying to hold up the tent. at
                  about 2am, we heard a few avalanch cannons. At about 4 am, we
                  started packing up so we could fix the tent. We didn't want to
                  bother the stakes without having everything packed in case we lost
                  it all. I had my warm clothes on and almost all of my stuff packed,
                  and Patrick was just getting his stuff on and packed...when the tent
                  blew away! POOF...just like that we were exposed! It was so cold
                  it took my breath away, and I dove to catch the flying gear...when I
                  realized that my gloves were laying on the ground waiting to blow
                  away! Big mistake. I grabbed them and put them on before they were
                  lost, though, and then laid on Patrick's stuff while he put on his
                  boots and finished packing up. Luckily his Hex was also tied to a
                  tree so we recovered it, but didn't even try to search for his 11
                  snow stakes.

                  So the two of us went to another tent...Rob had been laying against
                  his tent wall to keep it from blowing away, so the three of us
                  crammed into a 1.5 man tent and waited for the sun to come up. More
                  avalanches. At sunrise, about 6:30 am, the four of us in Friday's
                  carpool started packing up to leave. When I had gone to Patrick's
                  tent the night before, I left my hammock and MacCat, so now I was
                  curious if it would still be there.

                  Praise for the MacCat!! It was flapping in the gusts because one of
                  the two ridgeline tie-outs broke, and 3 of 4 corner tie-outs were
                  broke. It was hanging by one ridgeline tie-out, one JRB tarp
                  tensioning line on a corner, and a mini-carabiner attaching the
                  other ridgeline to the hammock support. It bent that carabiner.
                  After gusting like that all night, I found absolutely no signs of
                  wear on the tarp.

                  So we started hiking out at 8am. Two miles in 4.5 hours...and there
                  were some pretty scary times. Even with snowshoes, we were still
                  post-holing up to our thighs. Saw a couple of small avalanches near
                  us, and twice we had to cross avalanche-prone slopes...a little
                  nerve-wracking for a Georgia boy like me! 2-3 feet my butt. At
                  least the wind was at our backs for most of the hike out.

                  Patrick's GPS saved us...in that weather, map and compass would have
                  been extremely difficult because we couldn't see any terrain
                  referents, and the trail wasn't marked. And of course we couldn't
                  see how we had come in because of the new snow. We knew where the
                  road was so we could have made it out, but it would have been much
                  more difficult because of the terrain in the High Sierras. As it
                  was, if the trail were a mile longer we would have had to hole up
                  for the day.

                  We finally got to the trailhead about 12:30...and had to dig the car
                  out. We were all soaked completely through and exhausted. We
                  couldn't feel our feet and I could barely move my fingers because I
                  lost a mitten shell when the tent blew away. There were times when
                  we weren't sure how we would make it out Sunday. If Patrick and I
                  had waited another 15 minutes to start packing up before the tent
                  blew away, this would be a very different story...very close call.

                  Good trip, though - nothing like breaking in a snow-camping newbie
                  with an unexpected Sierra blizzard! We were prepared for it as a
                  group, but the deep snow that wouldn't support our snow shoes gave
                  us big problems...at times, we could only take one step and rest,
                  one step and rest, etc.

                  Learned several good lessons about my gear and about snow camping -
                  I'll post them with pics on my page soon. Might even include some
                  videos of the perfectly horizontal snow.

                  Most important lesson: Hammocking in cold temps is easy. Being
                  prepared for a Sierra-style snowstorm in a hammock is not. Have a
                  bail-out plan that won't blow away.

                  Jeff





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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Coy
                  I was thinking Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! means wow!!! Coy Boy PS or this Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious can be split up in a number of ways, we
                  Message 8 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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                    I was thinking Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious! means wow!!!

                    Coy Boy
                    PS or this

                    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious can be split up in a number of
                    ways, we chose
                    this: "Super", "Cali", "Fragilistic", "Expialidocious".

                    Super...
                    - Higher than another in rank, station, or authority: a superior
                    officer.
                    - Of a higher nature or kind.
                    - Of great value or excellence; extraordinary.
                    - Greater in number or amount than another: an army defeated by
                    superior numbers of enemy troops.
                    - Affecting an attitude of disdain or conceit; haughty and
                    supercilious.
                    - Above being affected or influenced; indifferent or immune: "Trust
                    magnates were superior to law" (Gustavus Myers).
                    - Located higher than another; upper.

                    Analysis so far: Super meaning Superior, ie: Superior Officer.

                    Cali... This could mean 1 of 3 things...
                    - A city of western Colombia on the Cali River southwest of Bogotá.
                    It was founded in 1536. Population: 1,369,331.
                    - (Hindoo Myth.) The tenth avatar or incarnation of the god Vishnu.
                    [Written also Kali.]
                    - Abbreviation for California

                    Analysis so far: A Californian Superior Officer.

                    Fragilistic:
                    I still haven't worked this one out entirly, but we were thinking
                    its to do with multiplayer games or more feasably to do with
                    killing, deriving from the word "Frag"
                    - A fragmentation grenade.
                    - To wound or kill (a fellow soldier) by throwing a grenade or
                    similar explosive at the victim: "He got fragged. Blown away"
                    (Bobbie Ann Mason).
                    - [from Vietnam-era U.S. military slang via the games Doom and
                    Quake] 1. To kill another player's avatar in a multiuser game. "I
                    hold the office Quake record with 40 frags." 2. To completely ruin
                    something. "Forget that power supply, the lightning strike fragged
                    it.

                    Analysis so far: A Californian Superior Officer killed or wounded.

                    Expialidocious:
                    The hardest one yet, still little understanding of what this word
                    means, or even what it could derive from.

                    Dictionary.com returned the following for "expialidocious":

                    Did you mean exploits?
                    Suggestions:
                    exploits
                    explodes

                    Keeping with the theme of "Fragilistic" I realised
                    that "Expialidocious" must have something to do with "explodes".

                    Final Summary

                    Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious actually means: A Californian
                    Superior Officer exploded by a fragmentation grenade.


                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Joiner" <joiners@b...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Jeff:
                    >
                    > as one Georgia boy (I'm actually an Alabama boy relocated to the
                    big city in
                    > GA) to another, quoting a local radio talk show host, "...just
                    damn!"
                    > Sounds like a fun trip that will be more fun now that you're
                    finished and
                    > out safe!
                    >
                    > Steve
                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • jack_tier
                    ... Jeff, WOW! Some adventure...Sure glad that you are all right...Can t wait for the pictures. Jack
                    Message 9 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jwj32542" <jwj32542@y...>
                      wrote:
                      >

                      >
                      > > Most important lesson: Hammocking in cold temps is easy. Being
                      > prepared for a Sierra-style snowstorm in a hammock is not. Have a
                      > bail-out plan that won't blow away.
                      >
                      > Jeff
                      >


                      Jeff,

                      WOW! Some adventure...Sure glad that you are all right...Can't wait
                      for the pictures.

                      Jack
                    • jwj32542
                      ... Hey! I didn t have any grenades in my pack...too dern heavy! And I m only living in California...I m NOT a Californian!
                      Message 10 of 16 , Dec 19, 2005
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                        > Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious actually means: A Californian
                        > Superior Officer exploded by a fragmentation grenade.

                        Hey! I didn't have any grenades in my pack...too dern heavy! And I'm
                        only living in California...I'm NOT a Californian!
                      • David Wills
                        Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after reading that trip report? - David with no trailname
                        Message 11 of 16 , Dec 21, 2005
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                          Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after reading
                          that trip report? - David with no trailname
                        • J.D. Hoessle
                          ... ...hehehe! YES....!!! I m never going to post a trip report unless I have the National Geographic Film Crew following me... ...! Or, maybe the
                          Message 12 of 16 , Dec 21, 2005
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                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                            <little_daddy979@y...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after reading
                            > that trip report? - David with no trailname

                            ...hehehe! YES....!!! I'm never going to post a trip report unless I
                            have the National Geographic Film Crew following me...<g>...! Or,
                            maybe the "Stupid-Things-Videos" show....?

                            Happy Trails,

                            J.D.
                          • J.D. Hoessle
                            Message 13 of 16 , Dec 21, 2005
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                              <little_daddy979@y...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after reading
                              > that trip report? - David with no trailname
                            • J.D. Hoessle
                              ... ...hehehe! YES....!!! I m never going to post a trip report unless I have the National Geographic Film Crew following me... ...! Or, maybe the
                              Message 14 of 16 , Dec 21, 2005
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "J.D. Hoessle" <JD@H...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                                > <little_daddy979@y...> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after reading
                                > > that trip report? - David with no trailname

                                ...hehehe! YES....!!! I'm never going to post a trip report unless I
                                have the National Geographic Film Crew following me...<g>...! Or,
                                maybe the "Stupid-Things-Videos" show....?

                                Sorry about this double post. Comcast timed out on me.

                                Happy Trails,

                                J.D.
                              • Coy
                                Na, just wimpier. Like my trip report form last night. I set up at 4 PM (on the ground no less) It was 33 when I left the house and 29 when I returned an hour
                                Message 15 of 16 , Dec 21, 2005
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                                  Na, just wimpier. Like my trip report form last night. I set up at 4
                                  PM (on the ground no less) It was 33 when I left the house and 29 when
                                  I returned an hour later - I hiked the 1/4 mile back home for a warm
                                  super and to put the dogs in the basement. I went back out at 8:30 PM
                                  and it was already showing 26 F. It was 19 F when I returned home
                                  this morning (I was hopeing for colder). Of couse my over half full
                                  gatorade was froze solid this AM. It was nearly so at 3 AM the last
                                  time I took a sip. I slept a lot warmer than I did the other night.
                                  I had my balvalaca with the nose and face holes on to keep my face
                                  warm. I dont think that made that much differance but my neck actually
                                  stayed damp the first few hours last night. Instead of venting I just
                                  enjoyed the oven sensation for a while. After I had to get up to pee
                                  at 11 PM thewarm neck cured itself. I guess it was getting colder.
                                  Anyways my neck is sore this morning. I guess I am not used to
                                  sleeping flat without a piller. In a hammock I dont need a piller at
                                  all. Plus I tried to read a magazine last night but gave up after a
                                  little cause it was just not comfortable. I can read much easier in
                                  my hammock by scooting toward the head end till I'm through reading.

                                  Coy Boy

                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                                  <little_daddy979@y...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after
                                  reading
                                  > that trip report? - David with no trailname
                                  >
                                • jwj32542
                                  ... reading ... I hope not...it s not a contest. I m more interested in hearing how other folks deal with 20+F temps with mild winds because that s what most
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Dec 22, 2005
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                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Wills"
                                    <little_daddy979@y...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Does anybody else feel inadequate to try and post things after
                                    reading
                                    > that trip report?

                                    I hope not...it's not a contest. I'm more interested in hearing how
                                    other folks deal with 20+F temps with mild winds because that's what
                                    most of us are usually out in...so that's where new ideas have more
                                    utility. Post away! (I know you were probably joking, but I want to
                                    make sure everyone knows that their reports are still interesting...no
                                    need to hold back!)

                                    :)

                                    Jeff
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