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Gauging effectiveness of cool weather modifications

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  • Jim & Marlis Greenway
    I wanted to get some feedback about my experience with trying to stay warm in my Hennessy Hammock last night. I camped near a stream back in the hills in north
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 27, 2003
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      I wanted to get some feedback about my experience with trying to stay warm
      in my Hennessy Hammock last night. I camped near a stream back in the hills
      in north central Georgia last night. My guess is that it got into the low
      fifties or high forties. I used the HH (one of the first ones that they sold
      commercially), a standard, blue closed cell foam pad from Walmart and an
      18-year old, well used down Marmot bag rated to 20 deg. (I think). I also
      slept in hiking socks, a t shirt and BDU pants. I've never been particularly
      sensitive to cold but I was unconfortably chilled until I added the blue
      foam pad to the bag and HH. After I included the pad, I was still cold any
      place I hung off the pad. I suppose my questions have to do with whether my
      being chilled was more a function of sleeping in a hammock in general or of
      my use of a down sleeping bag that's probably lost much of its former loft.
      Should I have expected to have been a little cool in a hammock regardless of
      the sleeping bag/mat? Or, am I becoming a wuss in my approaching middle
      age?

      Thanks,
      Jim Greenway
    • Amy
      ... Hammocks sleep cooler than the ground. It makes them great for tropical use. :) I use some kind of insulation other than a sleeping bag under me in all
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 27, 2003
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        On Sunday, April 27, 2003, at 12:41 PM, Jim & Marlis Greenway wrote:

        > I wanted to get some feedback about my experience with trying to stay
        > warm
        > in my Hennessy Hammock last night. I camped near a stream back in the
        > hills
        > in north central Georgia last night. My guess is that it got into the
        > low
        > fifties or high forties. I used the HH (one of the first ones that they
        > sold
        > commercially), a standard, blue closed cell foam pad from Walmart and an
        > 18-year old, well used down Marmot bag rated to 20 deg. (I think). I
        > also
        > slept in hiking socks, a t shirt and BDU pants. I've never been
        > particularly
        > sensitive to cold but I was unconfortably chilled until I added the blue
        > foam pad to the bag and HH. After I included the pad, I was still cold
        > any
        > place I hung off the pad. I suppose my questions have to do with
        > whether my
        > being chilled was more a function of sleeping in a hammock in general
        > or of
        > my use of a down sleeping bag that's probably lost much of its former
        > loft.
        > Should I have expected to have been a little cool in a hammock
        > regardless of
        > the sleeping bag/mat? Or, am I becoming a wuss in my approaching middle
        > age?

        Hammocks sleep cooler than the ground. It makes them great for tropical
        use. :)

        I use some kind of insulation other than a sleeping bag under me in all
        but
        hot weather. You don't have to sleep cold! Well, you do if you don't
        carry
        anything to put under you.

        There are a variety of ways to keep warm. Ed can fill you in. :) Also
        I just posted
        about insulation, though I haven't tried this particular combination out
        in
        the cold yet.

        -amy
      • Rick
        I ll take a stab at this and then read below to see what others have already written: Jim and Marlis, About your experience with trying to stay warm in your
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 28, 2003
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          I'll take a stab at this and then read below to see what others have
          already written:

          Jim and Marlis,

          About your experience with trying to stay warm
          in your Hennessy Hammock last night. You wrote "I camped near a
          stream back in the hills
          > in north central Georgia last night. My guess is that it got into
          the low
          > fifties or high forties. I used the HH (one of the first ones that
          they sold
          > commercially)\

          (Great hammock... it will end up working and will keep you warm if
          you learn a few tricks.)

          , a standard, blue closed cell foam pad from Walmart

          From your answer below, you might do better with the Kmart blue pad
          because it is much wider... 27 inches wide.

          and an
          > 18-year old, well used down Marmot bag rated to 20 deg. (I think).
          I also
          > slept in hiking socks, a t shirt and BDU pants. I've never been
          particularly
          > sensitive to cold but I was unconfortably chilled until I added the
          blue
          > foam pad to the bag and HH. After I included the pad, I was still
          cold any
          > place I hung off the pad.

          I have not found any sleeping bag which is comfortable in an
          uninsulated hammock below 65 degrees. The sleeping bag gets really
          thin and you will get cold on your back and your hips.


          I suppose my questions have to do with whether my
          > being chilled was more a function of sleeping in a hammock in
          general or of
          > my use of a down sleeping bag that's probably lost much of its
          former loft.


          I think you will find your bag works great in the hammock; but would
          suggest you open all but about a foot down near the end, making it
          into a quilt with a box you can put your feet into. The pad will
          keep your bottom and back warm. The quilt works for the top. You
          are right, anyplace you are not protected by the pad will get cold,
          so get a pad wide enough to always be on the pad.

          > Should I have expected to have been a little cool in a hammock
          regardless of
          > the sleeping bag/mat? Or, am I becoming a wuss in my approaching
          middle
          > age?

          I do not think that wanting to be comfortable is being a wuss. You
          have all the ingredients (maybe minus a wide enough pad) to be very
          comfortable anyplace anywhere. I have used the setup described here
          and stayed warm down to about 30 degrees. Any lower and you will
          need more insulation... either a second shell under you filled with
          some insulation a la Garlington/Taco shell insulator, or a second
          thicker pad. With both, I have been rather toasty at 5 degrees with
          some wind.


          Rick<><
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