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IT LIVES!!! FrankenPod

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  • Rat
    Up until now my cold weather gear has consisted of varying degrees of pads. The coldest I have ever been in my Hammock is 25 degrees on a hunt last year. While
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 17, 2005
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      Up until now my cold weather gear has consisted of varying degrees of
      pads. The coldest I have ever been in my Hammock is 25 degrees on a
      hunt last year. While I was warm, I was not as comfortable as I am
      used to when sleeping in just the hammock.

      I have been watching and reading what everyone has been doing with
      their set-ups concerning cold weather. And, I finally made a decision.

      I really like the idea of a modular system like Ray garlington has
      built. I also thought that the "Pea Pod" type insulator would make me
      feel more like I was sleeping directly on the hammock. Plus it would
      allow the use of more insulation between the hammcok and the Pea Pod
      if it is needed. I plan on building a "Bag of Feathers" out of an old
      down Military bag I have just for this. But first the FrankenPod...

      I scavenged an old Coleman sleeping bag from the shed (~30-40 deg).
      Zipped it around my hammcok and marked it while my wife was lying in
      the hammock. Then, I cut it all up and re-sewed it. I can't really
      express how ugly it is in words, your just gonna hafta look at the
      pictures in my folder. I built this as a prototype to base future
      builds on. It will get a little use here at the house, but the real
      test will be when I go out in Nov. on the Annual Granger Hog Hunt. It
      is usually pretty cold by that time, so we will see.

      I just want to say thanks to everyone who post their homebrew stuff
      and maintain web-sites. Without ya'll I would never have attempted
      this.
    • Coy
      I can see a cord on the blue part that ends up under your head. ho do you keep that part spread out as wide as your head under you? I ended up cutting the
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 17, 2005
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        I can see a cord on the blue part that ends up under your head. ho do you keep that part
        spread out as wide as your head under you? I ended up cutting the hood part off of 2
        bags i fixed to slide over my hammock.

        Coy Boy

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rat" <hogn8r2004@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Up until now my cold weather gear has consisted of varying degrees of
        > pads. The coldest I have ever been in my Hammock is 25 degrees on a
        > hunt last year. While I was warm, I was not as comfortable as I am
        > used to when sleeping in just the hammock.
        >
        > I have been watching and reading what everyone has been doing with
        > their set-ups concerning cold weather. And, I finally made a decision.
        >
        > I really like the idea of a modular system like Ray garlington has
        > built. I also thought that the "Pea Pod" type insulator would make me
        > feel more like I was sleeping directly on the hammock. Plus it would
        > allow the use of more insulation between the hammcok and the Pea Pod
        > if it is needed. I plan on building a "Bag of Feathers" out of an old
        > down Military bag I have just for this. But first the FrankenPod...
        >
        > I scavenged an old Coleman sleeping bag from the shed (~30-40 deg).
        > Zipped it around my hammcok and marked it while my wife was lying in
        > the hammock. Then, I cut it all up and re-sewed it. I can't really
        > express how ugly it is in words, your just gonna hafta look at the
        > pictures in my folder. I built this as a prototype to base future
        > builds on. It will get a little use here at the house, but the real
        > test will be when I go out in Nov. on the Annual Granger Hog Hunt. It
        > is usually pretty cold by that time, so we will see.
        >
        > I just want to say thanks to everyone who post their homebrew stuff
        > and maintain web-sites. Without ya'll I would never have attempted
        > this.
        >
      • J.D. Hoessle
        ... L_O_V_E it... ....! Just in time for Halloween too! Thanks! Got me laughing first thing this AM. Happy Trails, J.D.
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 18, 2005
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rat" <hogn8r2004@y...> wrote:
          > But first the FrankenPod...

          L_O_V_E it...<g>....!

          Just in time for Halloween too!

          Thanks! Got me laughing first thing this AM.

          Happy Trails,

          J.D.
        • Rat
          ... What I did was this. I sewed three webbing loops to the hood at the small end. One in the middle and one on each end. I ran a piece of 550 cord through
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 18, 2005
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
            What I did was this. I sewed three webbing loops to the hood at the
            small end. One in the middle and one on each end. I ran a piece of
            550 cord through them and ran that through the loop on the
            suspension lines where it wraps aroound my whipped ends. I secure
            the cord to my ridgeline with a taught-line hitch. The FrankenPod is
            pushed to the foot end, I get in, pull the pod over me, then I slide
            the taught-line hitch down towards my feet and it brings the hood up
            tight to the hammock bottom.

            Rigged this way I can easily ventilate the pod by slipping the
            taught-line hitch back towards my head (letting air between the pod
            and the hammock bottom) or, if it gets colder, I will be able to
            stuff some more insulation between the pod and the hammock and be
            able to adjust the compression while I am in the hammock by myself.

            I will post some close-up pictures 2morrow.

            >
            > I can see a cord on the blue part that ends up under your head. ho
            do you keep that part
            > spread out as wide as your head under you? I ended up cutting the
            hood part off of 2
            > bags i fixed to slide over my hammock.
            >
            > Coy Boy
          • Rat
            Hey Coy, I posted the pictures of the hood rigging in the FrankenPod File in my album. You can easily see how it is done. Just don t say anything about my
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 20, 2005
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              Hey Coy, I posted the pictures of the hood rigging in the FrankenPod
              File in my album. You can easily see how it is done. Just don't say
              anything about my sewing :)!

              Rat
            • Coy
              now that is slick. The sewing is horendious but hey, the photos with writting looks good: ) The Darnell tent, was that in Iraq? Coy Boy
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 20, 2005
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                now that is slick. The sewing is horendious but hey, the photos with writting looks good:')


                The Darnell tent, was that in Iraq?

                Coy Boy


                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Rat" <hogn8r2004@y...> wrote:
                >
                > Hey Coy, I posted the pictures of the hood rigging in the FrankenPod
                > File in my album. You can easily see how it is done. Just don't say
                > anything about my sewing :)!
                >
                > Rat
                >
              • Rat
                Yep, the Darnell tents were what we used for tent city 2.3 (Third phase of tent city 2) in April of 04. That tent is invoiced for $10,000.00 EACH! However, it
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 21, 2005
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                  Yep, the Darnell tents were what we used for tent city 2.3 (Third
                  phase of tent city 2) in April of '04. That tent is invoiced for
                  $10,000.00 EACH! However, it really is a great set up, especially for
                  the military, it is expandable via modular sections, and can be fitted
                  for several different uses (kitchen, mess hall, shower yada, yada) but
                  they all use the same frame and interchangable pieces. Pretty cool, as
                  long as you have a five ton truck to haul it with! :)

                  > now that is slick. The sewing is horendious but hey, the photos
                  with writting looks good:')
                  >
                  >
                  > The Darnell tent, was that in Iraq?
                  >
                  > Coy Boy
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