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Re: [Hammock Camping] top entry test

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  • Dick Matthews
    Risk, Thank you for sharing your experience and knowledge. I appreciate it. ... Yes, it was pitched on a ridge line with a great view, but no shelter. The
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 4, 2005
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      Risk,

      Thank you for sharing your experience and knowledge. I appreciate it.



      Rick wrote:

      >Hi Dick,
      >
      >A couple comments from about 1000 miles of hammock camping on the AT,
      >using top entry hammocks of my own construction:
      >
      >Dick Matthews wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >>Help:
      >>
      >>I exited the hammock in a stiff wind and the hammock became a
      >>spinnaker. My pillow and quilt stayed in the hammock, but I was
      >>concerned. Is this a problem? Is there an easy solution?
      >>
      >>
      >
      >First, it is best to hang a hammock where there is not a stiff wind.
      >This is much more important for heat conservation than worrying about
      >something being blown away. However, for windy/cool weather use, I
      >always use my travel pod. It contains everything in the hammock. Ed's
      >Peapod is similar in completely enclosing the hammock and bag.
      >
      >
      >
      Yes, it was pitched on a ridge line with a great view, but no shelter.
      The overnight low was only 47.5 and the kit I was using had taken me
      comfortably to 28 in the HH. I know better but the view was great and
      the wind only lasted from about 4:00am to 6:00am.


      >>
      >>The stuff sack that came with the MacCat is an excellent bag to keep
      >>your coat handy. It has a loop that can be used to attach it to the
      >>hammock line with a micro-carabiner. It is obvious that this gear is
      >>designed by someone that uses the gear.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >A coat is also an excellent under leg warmer. The only time it is
      >necessary to use it is when a coat is necessary during the day and when
      >I search about for a place to put the coat. My insulation does not
      >extend to the end of my legs, and the coat works wonderfully on cold
      >winter nights to keep my calves warm from below.
      >
      >
      >
      I missed the mesh pockets on the HH ridge line - I will use the ridge

      >>line with mesh pockets and little hooks that I use with my tarp.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >I run a line under my tarp from one tree attachment to the other. This
      >makes a great place to hang glasses. A stuff sack for the hammock or
      >the fly can be hung there to keep small articles in. However, I mainly
      >keep a small collapsable bucket on the ground below my hammock when it
      >is not raining. I keep book, light, glasses, and anything I think I
      >might want in the night right there, and right at hand. With a top
      >entry hammock, my goodies do not need to be inside the hammock.
      >
      >
      >
      Conclusion:

      >>The top entry does have benefits, but I need more experience before I am
      >>willing to rely on it in a remote area.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >I trust the top entry hammock. And for most things that could go wrong,
      >it is much easier for me to fix this hammock in the field than a
      >commercial one.
      >
      >
      >
      I trust the gear, I do not trust my skill - yet.



      >Risk
      >
      >
      >



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