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Hammock pad thickness

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  • Dennis Rowell
    I just recently went backpacking in Mineral King using my Hennessy Ultralight Backpacker hammock. The temperature was about 35 degrees at the coldest, with a
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 5, 2005
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      I just recently went backpacking in Mineral King using my Hennessy
      Ultralight Backpacker hammock. The temperature was about 35 degrees
      at
      the coldest, with a slight breeze. I was using a 3/8" blue foam pad
      under me, a Western Mountaineering Highlite sleeping bag (rated at 35
      degrees), and wearing a fleece vest and pants. I was warm on top but
      almost froze my back - how thick of a pad do I need at 35 degrees? I
      know that underquilts are probably the warmest, but I want to keep my
      gear ultralight. Thanks,

      Dennis
    • Sandy Kramer
      My son-in-law is a police sergeant and will be going to Ms on Friday...mainly to act as security for the rescue folk. Would you please that a Miami-Dade
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 5, 2005
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        My son-in-law is a police sergeant and will be going to Ms on Friday...mainly to act as security for the rescue folk. Would you please that a Miami-Dade County Fire Rescue truck was hijacked in New Orleans and the thugs stole all their equipment?????

        Anyway, my daughter called today to see if i could put together some camping gear for him. He thought he would be taking his green-and-white but apparently they might be bussing them......lightweight gear to the rescue.

        having seen and read the "testimonials" about HHs from military personnel in afghanistan (?) and Iraq, I'm going to lend him my Byer's Hammock (willl I ever get it back I wonder? Had better see if they have any more at $20!!

        I'll be putting stuff together with him and hope I won't be kissing them goodbye....hell, I KNOW they probably won't come back..... tis all for a good and very worthy cause.

        i seem to think that somewhere I bought some bath "baby wipes" but will someone please help me find some sort of cleaning wipes since they are not likely to have access to running water for showers.

        but he ain't getting my Slinglight chair!!!

        sandy in miami







        Sandy Kramer

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      • J J
        ... See the table on this page: http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm If you re going to stack pads, the SPE is a great way to keep them on top of each
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 5, 2005
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          --- Dennis Rowell <rowelldennis@...> wrote:
          > how thick of a pad do I need at 35 degrees?

          See the table on this page:
          http://www.speerhammocks.com/Products/SPE.htm

          If you're going to stack pads, the SPE is a great way to keep them on
          top of each other.

          Jeff




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        • RevT
          From Ed Speer s Web site. http://www.speerhammocks.com/Tips/Tips%20on%20hammock%20camping.htm#Staying Switch to 1 thick sleep pad when temperatures drop below
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 5, 2005
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            From Ed Speer's Web site.
            http://www.speerhammocks.com/Tips/Tips%20on%20hammock%20camping.htm#Staying
            Switch to 1" thick sleep pad when temperatures drop below about 40 degF

            Also from his book
            30-40 deg F with 25 deg rated bag use a 1 in pad

            Here is the table in his book.
            http://www.hammockcamping.com/Free%20Reports/SpeerSleepPads.htm

            Brian

            On 9/5/05, Dennis Rowell <rowelldennis@...> wrote:
            > I just recently went backpacking in Mineral King using my Hennessy
            > Ultralight Backpacker hammock. The temperature was about 35 degrees
            > at
            > the coldest, with a slight breeze. I was using a 3/8" blue foam pad
            > under me, a Western Mountaineering Highlite sleeping bag (rated at 35
            > degrees), and wearing a fleece vest and pants. I was warm on top but
            > almost froze my back - how thick of a pad do I need at 35 degrees? I
            > know that underquilts are probably the warmest, but I want to keep my
            > gear ultralight. Thanks,
            >
            > Dennis
          • J J
            Just normal old baby wipes work fine...these were godsends in the desert. Walmart and some grocery stores also sell lemon-scented anti-bacterial wipes in a
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 5, 2005
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              Just normal old baby wipes work fine...these were godsends in the
              desert. Walmart and some grocery stores also sell lemon-scented
              anti-bacterial wipes in a plastic "can" that work pretty well, but
              they're more expensive.

              Hand sanitizer is awesome, too. It stings a bit at first, but can take
              care of the funk in "those places" when you have no other options.
              Pumps work good for back in the tent, and small bottles are great to
              carry in your pocket. Keeping clean hands in an environment like that
              can make a HUGE difference in staying healthy. I'm surprised they're
              not all wearing medical facemasks, actually...all that junk in the
              water is about to start floating in the air.

              Jeff




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            • Sandy Kramer
              thanks.. i was thinking...since there aren t likely to be any/many trees around....is it worth giving him the hammock? (bearing in mind that I was supposed
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                thanks..

                i was thinking...since there aren't likely to be any/many trees around....is it "worth" giving him the hammock? (bearing in mind that I was supposed to go kayak camping this weekend and it was going to be my first time using it? But I may have to cancel out of that.)

                maybe i'll send him the HH URL for the pix of hammocks hanging from tanks etc. and let him decide (ease the guilt that way!)

                i have a box with some face masks...


                J J <jwj32542@...> wrote:
                Just normal old baby wipes work fine...these were godsends in the
                desert. Walmart and some grocery stores also sell lemon-scented
                anti-bacterial wipes in a plastic "can" that work pretty well, but
                they're more expensive.

                Hand sanitizer is awesome, too. It stings a bit at first, but can take
                care of the funk in "those places" when you have no other options.
                Pumps work good for back in the tent, and small bottles are great to
                carry in your pocket. Keeping clean hands in an environment like that
                can make a HUGE difference in staying healthy. I'm surprised they're
                not all wearing medical facemasks, actually...all that junk in the
                water is about to start floating in the air.

                Jeff




                ______________________________________________________
                Click here to donate to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort.
                http://store.yahoo.com/redcross-donate3/


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              • zippydooda
                ... thick Thicker than 3/8 , apparently ;-) I made it all night down to 35 with a 3/4 inch pad. I think I am a cold sleeper. I was wearing a bunch of
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Rowell"
                  <rowelldennis@y...> wrote:
                  > ...35 degrees... 3/8" blue foam pad...almost froze my back - how
                  thick

                  Thicker than 3/8", apparently ;-)

                  I made it all night down to 35 with a 3/4 inch pad. I think I am a
                  cold sleeper. I was wearing a bunch of clothes. Every now and then a
                  part of my body would touch the hammock where the pad wasn't, and I
                  would get a cold spot. I'd recommend the SPE or something that
                  accomplishes the same thing, and a 1" pad would probably be nice.

                  Bill in Houston
                • Dave Womble
                  ... then a ... Thin closed cell foam (ccf) pads only slightly alter the comfort of a hammock as they still bend and flex enough to follow the contours of your
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "zippydooda" <zippydooda@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Rowell"
                    > <rowelldennis@y...> wrote:
                    > > ...35 degrees... 3/8" blue foam pad...almost froze my back - how
                    > thick
                    >
                    > Thicker than 3/8", apparently ;-)
                    >
                    > I made it all night down to 35 with a 3/4 inch pad. I think I am a
                    > cold sleeper. I was wearing a bunch of clothes. Every now and
                    then a
                    > part of my body would touch the hammock where the pad wasn't, and I
                    > would get a cold spot. I'd recommend the SPE or something that
                    > accomplishes the same thing, and a 1" pad would probably be nice.
                    >
                    > Bill in Houston

                    Thin closed cell foam (ccf) pads only slightly alter the comfort of a
                    hammock as they still bend and flex enough to follow the contours of
                    your body. When you stack them or use thick solid ccf pads they are
                    more rigid and don't flex as well. Over a half inch is where I draw
                    the line but this is an individual preference/tolerane type of
                    thing. For me it can cause a sore tush on those long 14+ hour winter
                    nights that starts after 10 continuous hours on them. This is where
                    certain models of Them-a-Rest pads like the RidgeRest work well for
                    me. The regular RidgeRest at 5/8" thick is very flexible and has
                    indentations that adds cushioning, I use a 3/4 length one on top of
                    another 3/8" ccf pad in my SPE for 20 degree weather unless I want to
                    use a self inflating pad. At some point as temperatures drop, weight
                    vs pack bulk vs comfort starts making the self inflating open cell
                    foam pads look more attractive. I haven't noticed any discomfort
                    problems with the self inflating pads. I haven't been in a position
                    to chose whether or not to incorporate self inflating pads since I
                    have been in the position of field testing an array of pads with the
                    SPE.

                    Youngblood
                  • quiltpatti
                    ... around....is it worth giving him the hammock? (bearing in mind that I was supposed to go kayak camping this weekend and it was going to be my first time
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Sandy Kramer
                      <sandykayak@y...> wrote:
                      > thanks..
                      >
                      > i was thinking...since there aren't likely to be any/many trees
                      around....is it "worth" giving him the hammock? (bearing in mind
                      that I was supposed to go kayak camping this weekend and it was
                      going to be my first time using it? But I may have to cancel out
                      of that.)

                      Hi Sandy,
                      I have 2 Byer Hammocks & am heavy, though not over the wgt limit, &
                      after a few nights use, I have had the ropes shift on the hammocks
                      so one edge hangs low and I had to hang on for dear life to avoid
                      getting dumped. So, if your s-i-l is a big guy this could be your
                      excuse to keep your hammock.

                      > maybe i'll send him the HH URL for the pix of hammocks hanging
                      from tanks etc. and let him decide (ease the guilt that way!)

                      Good idea, he could probably make it work between vehicles, or
                      vehicle and tree or post. HH would work, has bug net and fly, but
                      expensive, & you need it by Fri, right.

                      http://www.thetravelhammock.com/
                      Click on the ultralight hammock tab. At only $20, the price(&wgt) is
                      right and they ship fast, but no net or fly. This one does hold me.

                      Good luck working this one out.

                      I admire the generous men and women like your son-in-law who are
                      helping with the disaster relief.

                      Let us know about your kayak trip. I envy you. I have one kayak.
                      It's on Pine Island and I only get to use it once or twice a year
                      when I visit there from Indiana.

                      Patti
                    • jmgiv47
                      There are soooo many variables...not the least of which are how cold a sleeper the individual is and what the sleep system is composed of. I ve read complaints
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                        There are soooo many variables...not the least of which are how cold
                        a sleeper the individual is and what the sleep system is composed
                        of. I've read complaints of cold discomfort in temps that are
                        literally warmer than my house on some mornings when I've left the
                        windows open at night. I myself have been comfortable in the high
                        20s using the 1/4" pad that Oware sells (covered with a thin fleece
                        throw). And that was while wearing insulated clothing but using no
                        sleeping bag or top cover. Others have shivered at the thought. It
                        really is dependent upon the individual and it's not a competition...

                        The key, I think, is to experiment. If your backyard has trees
                        you're set. Spend some nights, or at least parts of nights in the
                        backyard in your hammock testing the gear. I'd recommend keeping it
                        as simple, light, and least bulky as possible while still being
                        comfortable in temps 5-10° colder than what you anticipate on the
                        trail.

                        FYI, while the Oware pad is bulky to pack, I think it's perfect for
                        a hammock. It's 60X40X1/4" and only weighs 7oz. The Campmor fleece
                        I clip to it, which adds extra insulation and helps fight
                        shoulder/back condensation, brings the total weight to 20oz. The
                        pad is 'sticky' and, given it's extra width, doesn't slide in the HH
                        very much. That extra width also cups around the sleeper's shoulders
                        giving extra insulation and wind block. For even colder temps, I've
                        cut down a piece of blue foam (20X40") which I can insert into the
                        sleeve formed by the Oware pad and fleece cover. For this extra 4oz
                        I figure the combination is good to the teens although I haven't
                        tested it at those temps. Overall, this mix'n'match pad combination
                        is good for temps from 70° to ~15 or 20° with weights ranging
                        from 7-25oz.

                        Experiment!

                        john


                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Rowell"
                        <rowelldennis@y...> wrote:
                        > I just recently went backpacking in Mineral King using my Hennessy
                        > Ultralight Backpacker hammock. The temperature was about 35 degrees
                        > at
                        > the coldest, with a slight breeze. I was using a 3/8" blue foam
                        pad
                        > under me, a Western Mountaineering Highlite sleeping bag (rated at
                        35
                        > degrees), and wearing a fleece vest and pants. I was warm on top
                        but
                        > almost froze my back - how thick of a pad do I need at 35 degrees?
                        I
                        > know that underquilts are probably the warmest, but I want to keep
                        my
                        > gear ultralight. Thanks,
                        >
                        > Dennis
                      • zippydooda
                        Youngblood knows more about this than I, so make sure you listen... Bill in Houston ...
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 6, 2005
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                          Youngblood knows more about this than I, so make sure you listen...

                          Bill in Houston

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
                          wrote:
                          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "zippydooda" <zippydooda@y...>
                          > wrote:
                          > > I made it all night down to 35 with a 3/4 inch pad.
                          <snip>
                          > Thin closed cell foam (ccf) pads only slightly alter the comfort of a
                          > hammock as they still bend and flex enough to follow the contours of
                          > your body.
                          > Youngblood
                        • chcoa
                          I had a simular experience Dennis. I used the 3/8 blue foam stuffed inside my Adventure Medical Bivy sack with a 40 SnugPak bag over me. It worked okay down
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 8, 2005
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                            I had a simular experience Dennis. I used the 3/8 blue foam stuffed
                            inside my Adventure Medical Bivy sack with a 40 SnugPak bag over me.
                            It worked okay down to 38 F but I was a little chilly off an on in the
                            early morning hours.

                            I'm thinking of going with something like Rick's overlap pad and using
                            a slightly thinner but wider torso pad under the blue foam next time
                            I'm in this temp. range.

                            I have also had good luck using the blue foam inconjunction with the
                            Hennessy Supershelter down to 27 F and that was without the Overcover.

                            Best of luck working out what is best for you.
                            jamie in az

                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Rowell"
                            <rowelldennis@y...> wrote:
                            > I just recently went backpacking in Mineral King using my Hennessy
                            > Ultralight Backpacker hammock. The temperature was about 35 degrees
                            > at
                            > the coldest, with a slight breeze. I was using a 3/8" blue foam pad
                            > under me, a Western Mountaineering Highlite sleeping bag (rated at 35
                            > degrees), and wearing a fleece vest and pants. I was warm on top but
                            > almost froze my back - how thick of a pad do I need at 35 degrees? I
                            > know that underquilts are probably the warmest, but I want to keep my
                            > gear ultralight. Thanks,
                            >
                            > Dennis
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