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Re: [Hammock Camping] Silk Hammocks-wood stoves

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  • zippydooda
    Would it be practical to use the inflater for your DAM as a bellows for the stove, and save the weight of the battery? Bill in Houston
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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      Would it be practical to use the inflater for your DAM as a bellows
      for the stove, and save the weight of the battery?

      Bill in Houston


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Bill Fornshell
      <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
      > My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new
      > design with some different materials and the new stove
      > should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight does not
      > count the battery for the small fan I use. I also use
      > the battery for my LED.
      >
      > My wood stove's like my new alcohol stoves are
      > designed to use modern combustion theory and
      > techniques.
      >
      > Bill in Texas
      >
      > --- dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@a...> wrote:
      >
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray
      > > Garlington"
      > > <rgarling@y...> wrote:
      > >
    • quiltpatti
      Hi wood burners, My dual fuel stove is pretty light and gets the job done. It s similar to Rick s coffee can wood stove but uses a 10 oz chix can with 9 air
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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        Hi wood burners,
        My dual fuel stove is pretty light and gets the job done. It's
        similar to Rick's coffee can wood stove but uses a 10 oz chix can
        with 9 air holes around the bottom. It contains the wood fire under
        and holds my water pot. I use my platypus drinking tube for a
        bellows. The can and coat hanger wires weigh 1.8 oz. A small pleated
        piece of heavy foil(1gm) holds an esbit tab closer to the pan and I
        put the short ends of the wires in the rim holes so there is a small
        air gap at top(won't burn without)and pan is close enough to esbit.
        Wood fire for supper and esbit for breakfast or in the rain. A 5 oz
        chicken can or 6oz COS salmon can stove weighs 1.1 oz and is just
        the right size for a 26oz beer can pot. Cans do rust and on a long
        hike might need to be replaced periodically.
        Patti


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...>
        wrote:
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Garlington"
        > <rgarling@y...> wrote:
        > > > I am going back to the small wood stove I made a few
        > > > years ago and see if I can up-grade the basic design
        > > > idea.
        > > be sure to take a look at Rick's web page about his wood
        stoves.
        > He
        > > had some really good ideas. I shouldn't admit this, but I have
        > > purchased a JetBoil.
        >
        > I've caught the woodstove bug as well. It turns out that there's
        a
        > small army of people out in the world working on how to make
        cheap,
        > efficient wood/biomass-fueled stoves, mostly for the third-world
        > poor. Huge amounts of info on the net too--lots of calculations
        > already worked out, plans, etcetera. The trick for backpackers is
        > getting the weight down while retaining the efficiency. (If I
        come
        > up with anything I'll put it online.) Anyone have any
        > recommendations as to which stove list/forum is the best?
        >
        > Doug Frost
      • Sandy Kramer
        about 6 years ago i arrived in oregon with the screw-on (propane butane) stove but the KOA didn t carry them and i had to drive around portland til i finally
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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          about 6 years ago i arrived in oregon with the screw-on (propane butane) stove but the KOA didn't carry them and i had to drive around portland til i finally found an outfitters.

          so i jumped when sportsmansguide had an alcohol and a wood-burning stove at really cheap prices. but, true to most of their stuff, lightweight is not a feature.

          the alcohol is a cute little cup with a lid - the legs twist out - and it comes in a "leather" bag/

          the wood one is really neat since it folds flat like a narrow paperback and also has a bag... i believe both have "loops" so you can hang onto belt or pack.

          but i haven't had to use them...and am concerned about availability of denatured alcohol...I will take them on my next fly 'n camp trip, where weight is not an issue.

          i tried a brief google but couldn't find them...i'm going kayak camping next weekend so i'll take them along to try them out.

          Bill Fornshell <bfornshell@...> wrote:
          My old wood stove weighs 6.5oz. I am working on a new
          design with some different materials and the new stove
          should weigh a little less. The 6.5oz weight does not
          count the battery for the small fan I use. I also use
          the battery for my LED.

          My wood stove's like my new alcohol stoves are
          designed to use modern combustion theory and
          techniques.

          Bill in Texas



          Sandy Kramer
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        • zippydooda
          HEET in the yellow bottle from an auto parts store or WalMart. Bill in Houston
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 2, 2005
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            HEET in the yellow bottle from an auto parts store or WalMart.

            Bill in Houston

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Sandy Kramer <sandykayak@y...>
            wrote:
            >and am concerned about availability of denatured alcohol...
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